Deposit & First Rent Before Signing Contract

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    Deposit & First Rent Before Signing Contract

    Hey guys,

    I am new to the flat hunting hobby since I have been staying solely in student residence. So now is the moment for me to look for a flat and I did and it was successful.

    So, I have found this flat in Battersea, London which I liked and I met with the current tenants today. This apartment belongs to a block of flats operated by a single company. The lady currently living there has a contract with the company and she is paying the rent for the whole apartment. However, my contract will be with the company as well.

    In order to take the room out of the market I have to pay a deposit of 500 pounds and this is totally fine.

    The room will be available for me to move in on the 1st of October, however, since I am going to be away I will be there on the 15th. However, I will have to pay the whole October's rent and that is something I have agreed to.

    The problem is that this lady wants me to pay the rent on the first of the month and the contract will be signed as soon as I move in on the 15th.

    To sum up, I will have paid a deposit and a month's rent without any contract or any other proof that my money are going for renting purposes.

    Any advice guys? I am a bit desperate...

    #2
    Originally posted by gmavrom View Post
    Any advice guys?
    Tell the landlord that you are not handing over any money except against receiving a signed contract.

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      #3
      You will need to sign the contract in the next few days before you go it you want to secure the room and they'll have to full their finger out to get the paperwork sorted for you

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        #4
        Thank you both for your replies.

        So essentially what I have decided to do is to give the deposit in order to secure the place and then to ask for a written receipt of the deposit. Then I will tell them to have a contract prepared for me otherwise I will not pay the rent.

        Sounds good?

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by gmavrom View Post
          Thank you both for your replies.

          So essentially what I have decided to do is to give the deposit in order to secure the place and then to ask for a written receipt of the deposit. Then I will tell them to have a contract prepared for me otherwise I will not pay the rent.

          Sounds good?
          Not really. The thing is that a deposit needs to hooked up to a contract. If the terms on which it is paid are vague (as they are likely to be if you just get a receipt that says: "Received deposit of 500 pounds") it gives the landlord an excuse to retain it, even if the excuse does not amount to a valid reason, or deny there was any contract. Remember that when someone has your money you need to do all the running to get it back.

          You mention that there is a tenant in occupation. What it looks like is that the landlord, quite understandably and indeed sensibly, does not wish to commit himself to a new tenancy until he is sure the current one has come to an end. However, he cannot have it that you are committed without committing himself.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by gmavrom View Post
            So, I have found this flat in Battersea, London which I liked and I met with the current tenants today. This apartment belongs to a block of flats operated by a single company. The lady currently living there has a contract with the company and she is paying the rent for the whole apartment. However, my contract will be with the company as well.

            ....The room will be available for me to move in on the 1st of October...

            .....The problem is that this lady wants me to pay the rent on the first of the month and the contract will be signed as soon as I move in on the 15th.
            Who is 'the lady' - the current tenant? You seem to be saying that you are negotiating with her and not with the landlord company?

            Do you mean you are intending to rent a room in the lady's flat, or to rent the whole flat?

            If you mean a room only, with the lady's tenancy of the whole flat remaining in place, then the landlord company cannot grant you a tenancy of the room and be your landlord, as the lady already has a tenancy of the whole flat. Only the lady can let the room to you, and she'd be your [resident] landlord, and you'd be her lodger.

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