Prepayment meter problem

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    Prepayment meter problem

    Hi,

    I thought my days of whining were over, but I'm back again and hoping you can help.

    whilst renting my previous property I wanted to change a prepayment meter to a monthly utilities bill, the agency told me this would not be a problem. I rang up the company, and had to change the account into my name before they would discuss anything with me. It then came to light that the prepayment meter in the property was not their's. I rang the agents back and they told me the owner had had it installed to make sure he was never left short on the bills.

    They told me my details would be removed from the account and the owner would continue to pay the bills as normal from the money from the prepayment meter.

    I left the property after two months on the 11 December due to many ongoing isues. The agents agreed we could leave and I thoguht that was that.

    Yesterday, I received a call from the energy supplier for the property telling me there is an outstanding balance of £290 for the periods I was living in the flat. They obviously want payment.

    I have spoken to the agents who are now telling me to deal with the owners.

    I don't know what to do and am very worried about this affecting my credit rating in the future.

    What do you suggest??

    The agency also said my full deposit would be returned and are now telling me the owner refuses to give that back too.

    Is court the answer??
    Last edited by daniellepace19; 26-01-2007, 13:53 PM.

    #2
    If you have a written tenancy agreement, what does your contract say about who is responsible for the payment of utility bills?

    What reasons have been given for the deposit being witheld?

    Let the forum members know whether you signed an inventory detailing the condition of the property when you checked into the property and if it was reviewed and signed when you checked out.

    Comment


      #3
      We did not sign an inventory for the property and have been given no reason why it has been witheld.

      We did quite the premises before the contract bended but this was with the letting agents consent.

      At the handover of keys we were assured all was fine with the property and the deposit would be returned shortly...

      I contacted the agents a few weeks later and they said the landlord did not want to return our deposit.

      As far as the contract it states we are responsible for bills, but we paid for our utilies daily with a coinage meter I asked the agents to empty this so I had the money to pay an eventual bill but they said they did not pocess keys and that the landlord empties and pays the bills...

      Comment


        #4
        Prepayment Gas Meters

        Does anyone know where I could buy a prepayment gas meter from? I don't want a £coin meter it's gotta be token only. I have the electric versions so there must be gas out there but I cant find any anywhere..... please help!

        Comment


          #5
          Ring up your supplier and ask them to install one. I presume you weren't thinking of installing it yourself???

          Comment


            #6
            Who pays cost of replacing prepayment gas meter?

            One of our tenants experienced a problem with their heating and when we sent out the engineer he diagnosed a problem with the pre-payment meter. The gas suppliers have subsequently confirmed the problem and have replaced the meter. My question is: who is responsible for the original engineer's bill?: The landlord, the tenant, or maybe even the supplier? My feeling is that it's the landlord and that it's just one of those unexpected 'quirks of the job', but I thought I'd throw it into the air and see.

            Comment


              #7
              its a submeter I need coz there's only the main gas into the property and then it branches off to each flat

              Comment


                #8
                I would have thought that the supplier has liability here, from what you have said.
                Whether you pay for the engineer and then reclaim against the supplier or get the engineer to send the bill direct to the supplier is a question.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Question about responsibility for payment of a bill.

                  I think you misunderstood my question. Looking at it again I could have worded it somewhat better!

                  The suppliers are happy to replace the meter at no cost to anyone. The bill in question was from the original visiting engineer we called out when we thought there was a problem with the heating. He diagnosed the issue as being the meter and then left. He then submitted a bill for his time. My question is; who is responsible for that?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    The (defective) meter might have been:
                    a. damaged by T (so T should pay); or
                    b. simply worn-out by normal usage (so L should pay);
                    c. inherently defective and installed only recently (so supplier should replace free).
                    JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                    1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                    2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                    3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                    4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by greengriff View Post
                      I think you misunderstood my question. Looking at it again I could have worded it somewhat better!

                      The suppliers are happy to replace the meter at no cost to anyone. The bill in question was from the original visiting engineer we called out when we thought there was a problem with the heating. He diagnosed the issue as being the meter and then left. He then submitted a bill for his time. My question is; who is responsible for that?
                      I haven't misunderstood your question.

                      I think the supplier of the defective meter should pay for the engineer's visit to your home, since that is what caused you to call out the engineer.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        The landlord pays for the initial call out as part and parcel of operating a rental property. You could try recovery from the supplier but I doubt you'll find them very co-operative. Oh, and it would be down to you or the landlord to chase payment from them not the contractor, his contract is with you not the supplier, so asking him to bill them direct is a non starter.

                        If the tenant had damaged it the supplier would have told you about it; its a criminal offence to tamper with a gas meter.

                        Your engineer went out to investigate a suspected fault with the heating; there wasn't one. Finding out that the meter was at fault instead was a just by product of that call and probably a lot cheaper than a repair to the heating system.
                        My advice is not based on formal legal training but experience gained in 20+ years in the letting industry.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          A coin in the slot meter is a recipe for disaster. If the meter cuts out and someone puts money in without making sure all the outlets are turned off, then





                          BOOM
                          I offer no guarantee that anything I say is correct. wysiwyg

                          Comment


                            #14
                            You've all confirmed what I suspected. I can imagine getting money out of a utility supplier would be a difficult task :-)

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by jta View Post
                              A coin in the slot meter is a recipe for disaster. If the meter cuts out and someone puts money in without making sure all the outlets are turned off, then





                              BOOM
                              It'll be the only 'boom' this year; everthing else is going 'bust'.
                              JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                              1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                              2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                              3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                              4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

                              Comment

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