Ridiculous cooker situation

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    Ridiculous cooker situation

    The oven and grill part of the cooker in one of our tenanted properties broke.
    The Landlord was informed and we sent out our engineer to have a look. He was unable to repair it as the thermocoupling (whatever that is) had gone and as the cooker was a very cheap Argos model, he said it would be more economical to replace it.
    I passed on this to the Landlord, who was not happy as the cooker is 2 yrs old.
    Anyway, to cut a long story very short, our engineer had to write a report to Argos (£40) and now we have to wait 2 weeks for them to muse over it and get back to us.
    The report clearly states that it is just 'one of those things' and not a manufacturing fault or abuse by the tenants.The Landlord was informed of this.
    All in all, this has taken 3 weeks so far and the tenant has not been able to use the oven, which would not be so bad if she didn't have 4 kids!
    It is going to be at least another week before Argos get back to us and say that the Landlord needs to buy another oven.
    I feel so sorry for the tenant.
    The oven is part of the AST and I want to ask the Landlord for a rental reduction next month but she will say no as she has spent £40 on an engineers report and had to buy a new cooker.
    Is there anything we can do legally here?

    #2
    Does the tenancy agreement make the landlord responsible for repairs to appliances?

    (Don't forget it is the landlord that pays the agencys fees - not the tenant!)

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      #3
      Yes. The Landlord is responsible in this case.

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        #4
        Many agancies have a limit under which they don;t have to seek the landlords permission do do works (ie to save landlord being bothered every time a tap washer needs changing!). Does your agency agreement have such a clause, and is it worded to cover such situations?

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          #5
          In our Terms of Business, it is stated that we can use £200 for any emergencies, (such as burst pipes)if we are unable to contact the Landlord for any reason. It would not be used in this case.

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            #6
            Do you work for the landlord, or the tenant?
            Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

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              #7
              The Landlord of course but I am also human and these are very good tenants that any Landlord would love to keep happy! What a strange question to ask.

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                #8
                If you read your opening post as someone working on behalf of the tenant, it makes more sense, so not a strange question by any means.
                Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

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                  #9
                  I don't think it is a strange question - hence my comment in post #2.

                  The thing is, this is the landlords business (not your agencys) and it is up to him how he manages the landlord/tenant relationship. If he chooses to treat the tenants with a degree of disinterest and that causes the tenants to leave earlier than they would otherwise have done, that is the landlords choice and it is the landlord who has to deal with the consequences (or pay you to do so).

                  It may be that the terms and conditions of the agency agreement state that the landlord must comply with the tenancy agreement or face certain consequences, maybe you could even terminate the agreement with the landlord as his actions must have an impact on your business' reputation.

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                    #10
                    Hmmm. It may seem that, as my bias is towards the tenant in this situation and I have very good reason for this to be the case due to past history. This is not the norm, of course.
                    However, I have not really had any type of answer to this question, just more questions, so I can assume that no reader of this post knows the answer......as yet anyway!

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                      #11
                      Thanks Snorkerz. I guess that's the long and short of it. Much appreciated.

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                        #12
                        Your question was - "Is there anything we can do legally here?"

                        The answer is no.

                        The tenant could conceivably sue the landlord but the cost and potential consequences (eviction) may outweigh the minor benefits.

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