Unfair call out charges

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  • Unfair call out charges

    I recently moved into a new flat and couldn't figure out how to operate the oven. The landlord didn't leave any instructions to guide me on this matter so I called them up for advice. I was told by them to look online for 'internet instructions'. I had a look online but explained that it was difficult to find any help online as I did not have a model number for the oven. They called the previous tenant to see if the oven was working okay before, which it was, and then proceeded to book an electrician to look at it

    The electrician, to my surprise, managed to get the oven working in no time and said there was no fault. It turned out that the timer had to be turned all the way around clockwise, past the 90 minute setting onto a hand which signified that the oven was being turned from a manual to an automatic setting.

    As I had no way of knowing this as the landlord had failed to provide me with a manual or clear instructions to how the oven works am I still liable to pay the call out fee which they want to charge me? Just seems a bit unfair to me

  • #2
    The internet is a bottomless resource, plenty of manuals, help forums etc. You knew the make if not model. Could have rung manuf for advice etc. or even take pic on phone to local elec repair shop. Manuals get lost etc, LL cannot be expected to keep replacements.
    I always make it clear to Ts that any callout arranged by me to appliance that is not faulty, is at Ts cost.
    What makes you think LL knew how to turn it on?

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    • #3
      Well I had no access to internet at the time which didn't help due to having just moved into the place and looking for work at the time so I didn't have easy access to the internet. It's not that I thought the landlord would know how to turn it on but I thought they had some kind of responsibility to keep copies of the operating manual to prevent this kind of thing happenning. I don't think its asking a lot really

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      • #4
        I disagree with Mariner.

        It is the landlords responsibility to provide you with the instructions/knowledge to operate equipment supplied. Certainly, if you had managed to break the cooker because you were operating it incorrectly you could not be charged if no instructions were provided.

        Cookers are usually 'common sense' operation, and if that were the case here then there may be some argument, but this is obviously a 'non-standard' way of operation and I think it is the landlords responsibility to ensure you know how to use the idiosyncratic equipment he provided.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Snorkerz View Post

          Cookers are usually 'common sense' operation, and if that were the case here then there may be some argument, but this is obviously a 'non-standard' way of operation
          Not that non-standard, I have exactly the same system of control on my home cooker, it is very obvious how it works.
          I offer no guarantee that anything I say is correct. wysiwyg

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jta View Post
            Not that non-standard, I have exactly the same system of control on my home cooker, it is very obvious how it works.
            Perhaps it is obvious because you know how to do it.

            I agree with Snorkerz and as the LL booked the electrician, I think he (LL) should pay for it. LLs should know how things work in their properties and be able to explain them to new Ts.
            'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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