Tenant Locked Herself Out

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    Tenant Locked Herself Out

    Hi all
    One of my tenants has lost her keys to the property.
    So I went round there to let her in with my keys only to find that she had changed the lock on the door at some point without my knowing. so my keys were no good.
    Can anyone tell me if it’s the tenants responsibly to cover the cost of a lock smith or do I have to stand the cost?
    Thanks Neil

    #2
    Totally the tenants problem. Even if she hadn't changed the lock, it would have still been her problem.

    Comment


      #3
      Just as an aside to this I used to have a clause within my terms with tenants (who were advised when they were in fact only applicants) that if they were to lose keys and called me out, dependent upon the time of day (or night) there was a scale of charges that had to be paid in cash before I would allow them re-entry using the office held key.

      This covered the cost of changing the lock(s) too, and on the odd occasion it occured you can bet they didn't lose them again. It usually happened after the tenants had been to a "function" and were unable to function normally as a result!
      The advice I give should not be construed as a definitive answer, and is without prejudice or liability. You are advised to consult a specialist solicitor or other person of equal legal standing.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Neil H View Post
        So I went round there to let her in with my keys only to find that she had changed the lock on the door at some point without my knowing. so my keys were no good.
        That'll teach her to change the lock without your knowledge, won't it?

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Paul_f View Post
          Just as an aside to this I used to have a clause within my terms with tenants (who were advised when they were in fact only applicants) that if they were to lose keys and called me out, dependent upon the time of day (or night) there was a scale of charges that had to be paid in cash before I would allow them re-entry using the office held key.

          This covered the cost of changing the lock(s) too, and on the odd occasion it occured you can bet they didn't lose them again. It usually happened after the tenants had been to a "function" and were unable to function normally as a result!
          If you were to attend I think that, yes, I think you could charge for your time and work if it was made clear in advance.
          But I would be very careful when using the term "allow re-entry"...

          Comment


            #6
            Agree with 'jjlandlord'.
            To allow re-entry could imply to the tenant that you would see it reasonable to deny re-entry. Just be cautious over that one. A clued up and malicious tenant would use that to their advantage.
            I may be a housing professional but my views, thoughts, opinions, advice, criticisms or otherwise on this board are mine and are not representative of my company, colleagues, managers. I am here as an independent human being who simply wants to learn new stuff, share ideas and interact with like minded people.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Paul_f View Post
              Just as an aside to this I used to have a clause within my terms with tenants (who were advised when they were in fact only applicants) that if they were to lose keys and called me out, dependent upon the time of day (or night) there was a scale of charges that had to be paid in cash before I would allow them re-entry using the office held key.

              This covered the cost of changing the lock(s) too, and on the odd occasion it occured you can bet they didn't lose them again. It usually happened after the tenants had been to a "function" and were unable to function normally as a result!
              "Used to have".

              Would you explain why it is no longer there, or what changed? (Career?)

              ML
              Refer Mad Regulators to Arkell vs Pressdram.

              Comment


                #8
                Read my signature on most of my posts to see what I do now. Most of you already know!
                The advice I give should not be construed as a definitive answer, and is without prejudice or liability. You are advised to consult a specialist solicitor or other person of equal legal standing.

                Comment

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