Arranging repairman access to property

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  • jamesvince26
    replied
    I totally agree with this....

    Yes the LL may have agree to furnish the property and therefore has obligations to maintain the appliances in the house. They haven't questioned that and bought a new cooker.

    If the tenants are that bothered about having a cooker then they should make the time to allow for access. You need to have a working relationship between landlord and tenant as well as a contractual one. It's fairly unreasonable to expect your parents to cross the channel for a door opening exercise. Although I do take the point that really if you are overseas you need a point of contact (may that be an Agent or Maintenance guy) that can deal with these issues.

    Ultimately it's not the tenants problem that your parents live abroad, maybe with hindsight this should have been disclosed to the tenants before they moved in so strategies for these events could have already been pre planned. The responsibility to fit that cooker around the tenants working hours is resting with your in-laws. I'm presuming that the T was around to take delivery of the cooker in the first place. They should see if an electrician can visit on or around a similar time.

    For future reference most major retailers offer a delivery and installation service which might be best for them. It is a premium cost but at least the problem gets resolved at one time when the tenant is around to take delivery of the new appliance.

    It seems like a really ridiculous problem to have in this day and age. Have you tried contacting an electrician - explaining the situation to try and get them to do an out of hours appointment one evening. The charge may be more but would probably offset the flight costs for a return to Paris?!

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  • LesleyAnne
    replied
    Originally posted by thesaint View Post
    Simply tell them that the cooker is waiting to be fitted, and that they can either wait until the landlord next comes to the UK, and they will arrange to let the trader in, they will give the electrician the key, and he will let himself in, or they can arrange to be in during the times when the electrician works.
    And do so in writing, so if the T later starts shouting about the LL's lack of attention to their repair reuqests, you have proof you have done everything in your power to replace the cooker!

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  • thesaint
    replied
    Simply tell them that the cooker is waiting to be fitted, and that they can either wait until the landlord next comes to the UK, and they will arrange to let the trader in, they will give the electrician the key, and he will let himself in, or they can arrange to be in during the times when the electrician works.

    Leave a comment:


  • Interlaken
    replied
    Bizarre! How do you actually 'break' an electric cooker? You would think if tenants had no cooker they would be keen to get one that works fitted.

    Let's hope they don't break the bath.

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  • islandgirl
    replied
    Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
    Rather a harsh description of letting agents. Makes them sound like woodlice or something.
    And this description is inaccurate because....
    answers on a postcard please

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  • mariner
    replied
    Questions here appear to be:
    1 does LL have current keys to allow access?
    If no, then requirement on T to provide access with due Notice to LL or agents. In this case electrician would be 'LL agent'
    2 LL could appoint a UK resident relative to act as their agent
    OK T could refuse entry ( quiet enjoment ) but he couldn't subs claim failure to repair.
    Then there is Ts resp to 'act in a T like manner', they cannot report a problem and prevent access for rectification IMO.
    Any owner/occupier would be expected to arrange access whether in person or via trusted neighbours

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  • mind the gap
    replied
    Originally posted by Ericthelobster View Post
    somebody on the ground.
    Rather a harsh description of letting agents. Makes them sound like woodlice or something.

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  • LesleyAnne
    replied
    Are you also aware of the tax implications of letting a property in the UK when you live overseas? Have they nominated someone to pay tax on their rental income whilst they are abroad?

    I take it your parents have given the tenant a UK address for serving notices, otherwise, legally they cannot charge the tenant rent?

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  • Ericthelobster
    replied
    Originally posted by Andytizer View Post
    my in-laws (who are getting a bit overwhelmed letting without an agency for the first time).
    I'm definitely not a fan of agents but I don't think it's really reasonable to expect to be able to manage a let property sucessfully if you are overseas, with no support from somebody on the ground.

    Leave a comment:


  • Andytizer
    replied
    Hi I just wanted to come back to thank everyone on this threat who responded, this has been some really useful information for me and my in-laws (who are getting a bit overwhelmed letting without an agency for the first time).

    Leave a comment:


  • sparkie
    replied
    Originally posted by leaseholdanswers View Post
    With letting comes great responsibility....
    i swear i have heard a similar quote in a movie before

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  • leaseholdanswers
    replied
    While I agree with earlier posts- the tenant has a vested interest- I would not rely on that position. If the cooker is provided and requires replacement, then that burden falls on the landlord, fully. A tenant can simply say that I am not home and would be right; some are paid by the day or in a situation where a lost day is not practical or possible.

    That is why there is a clause in a tenancy allowing the landlord access on notice to repair.

    And there are many keen local companies that will supply and fit the cooker on a timescale that has a narrow window- they just cost more than say a big box retailer ( who for a premium will narrow it down as well and do weekend fittings).

    Should the tenant have to accommodate a landlord to allow them to get the cheapest price?.

    With letting comes great responsibility....

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  • mk1fan
    replied
    Agree with Paul-f on the view of access.

    Although, if the T is happy for an agent of the LL to provide access then this should be route to take. A family friend or relation of the LL would suffice.

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  • PaulF
    replied
    Originally posted by bhaal View Post
    It's the LL's responsibility to repair a cooker and so the TS should not have to take time off to deal with the repairs. Either your relatives will have to come to London or they will have to compensate the Ts for any lost holiday they have to take by being away from work.
    The tenant should allow access to the landlord or his workmen during "reasonable" hours of the day; that would be 8.00 a.m. to about 6.00 p.m. It's unrealistic to expect otherwise and anyway you will need an electrician with a Part 'P' qualification to connect it. Tenants have to put themselves out if they want a repair carried out, otherwise they probably aren't too concerned how long it might take. It's for their benefit after all.

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  • jjlandlord
    replied
    Originally posted by bhaal View Post
    It's the LL's responsibility to repair a cooker.
    I don't think LL has a statutory obligation to repair an electric cooker. He obviously could have a contractual obligation, though.

    In any case, here it seems that the cooker provided by LL needs replacing so imo it is indeed LL's responsibility.

    Leave a comment:

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