Condensation In Rental Property

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Condensation In Rental Property

    Hi There, First time poster, long time reader.

    I am a landlord, and had new tenants move into my one bedroom flat in Janaury. (it has been rented out for the past 6 years previous to that).

    The tenants called me out last week to say that the hardwood flooring is lifting by the window in the lounge. So I went and looked and there it was about 5sqm of wood flooring is lifted and warped.

    I asked them how long it had been like this and they said 3 weeks. I told them that this is condensation and that they need to adequately ventilate the place by opening windows, as they do a lot of cooking.

    To cut a long story short, I have had a contractor out to have a look who has found no reason other than condensation is the problem, he has suggested an extra vent in the front room which Im happy to do.

    But the main problem is the Wood Flooring which is down is dis-continued, which means leaving it to look unsightly or have the whole thing replaced. I have had two quotes for the flooring both coming in around £1500 to fit it (its a large lounge).

    I know we have had a cold winter, but this has not happened on previous tenancies, Should the tenant bare any cost on having the floor replaced?

    Sorry this is so long, just wanted to get all the facts in. Any help appreicated.

    #2
    First things first: read your own long-lease, to verify your own obligations. Only then jump on T re theirs.
    JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
    1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
    2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
    3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
    4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

    Comment


      #3
      Is it real wood? Couldn't you have it sanded and re-varnished? This would be much cheaper than replacing, and all you could reasonably expect tenant to pay for.
      To save them chiming in, JPKeates, Theartfullodger, Boletus, Mindthegap, Macromia, Holy Cow & Ted.E.Bear think the opposite of me on almost every subject.

      Comment


        #4
        Can you make a feature of a different style of flooring by the window, and introduce a divider between the two?

        ML
        Refer Mad Regulators to Arkell vs Pressdram.

        Comment


          #5
          Thank you for your replies. In my tenancy it states the tenant 'shall take all reasonable steps to keep the property aired and heated'.

          It is real wood flooring, oak. The affected area is warped and rotten, it will need to be ripped up. I had thought about a feature but i dont think it will look right.

          Comment


            #6
            I agree with #3 - replace the damaged bits with new oak, have the lot sanded and re-stained, it will be fine.

            You don't need to worry about this until the end of the tenancy, although I would make the tenants liability clear (in writing) at the earlest opportunity.

            How old was the floor - and did it come with a predicted lifespan? Laminate usually has something like 10-20 years, but I don't know if that applies to real wood.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Snorkerz View Post
              Laminate usually has something like 10-20 years, but I don't know if that applies to real wood.
              I've got a real wood floor sitting in my hall, ready to be fitted next weekend, so I've just checked. It is supposed to last a lifetime, as long as it isn't subjected to excessive moisture and high levels of humidity.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Mrs Mug View Post
                I've got a real wood floor sitting in my hall, ready to be fitted next weekend, so I've just checked. It is supposed to last a lifetime, as long as it isn't subjected to excessive moisture and high levels of humidity.
                Thats good, so therefore OP should be able to claim the full cost of repair through the deposit.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Thats good, so therefore OP should be able to claim the full cost of repair through the deposit

                  Not really, this is a real wood (oak) floor. IMO it depends how well it was seasoned. If not fully seasoned then LLs advice to tenant to keep property ventilated & heated could have warped the planks as it they further dried. Too dry and they could absorb moisture from condensation & warm moist air causing lift/warp. Obviously a top end let requiring expert advice for rectification.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thanks again for the advice.

                    I had lived there before I let it, so the floor has been down approximately 9-10 years, would expect it to last long than that, plus there has never been a problem with previous tenancies.

                    Its not a high end let, just a pretty standard one bedroom flat.

                    I think on a suggestion here, that I may just leave it until the end of the tenancy, replace part and sand and re-varnish, and just bite the bullet.

                    Comment

                    Latest Activity

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X