Landlords requirements with regards to glass panelled exterior doors.

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    Landlords requirements with regards to glass panelled exterior doors.

    We are looking to rent an old property, the back door of which has a large pain of glass on the top half, this glass is thin and does not have any protective film or looks shatterproof.

    My worry is that I have two small children and I don't want to run the risk of the door slamming and shattering on them. I would ideally like the door to be replaced not only safety reasons but for security reasons too. Does anybody know if the landlord is required to replace the door or make safe by law?

    I think we may have a problem with the managing agents as the security issue was mentioned to the agent taking us round to which he replied there was no crime in the area and the neighbours look out for each other. I on the other hand would like peace of mind.

    I appreciate any advice, many thanks.

    #2
    Originally posted by LandlordandTenant View Post
    We are looking to rent an old property, the back door of which has a large pain of glass on the top half, this glass is thin and does not have any protective film or looks shatterproof.

    My worry is that I have two small children and I don't want to run the risk of the door slamming and shattering on them. I would ideally like the door to be replaced not only safety reasons but for security reasons too. Does anybody know if the landlord is required to replace the door or make safe by law?

    I think we may have a problem with the managing agents as the security issue was mentioned to the agent taking us round to which he replied there was no crime in the area and the neighbours look out for each other. I on the other hand would like peace of mind.

    I appreciate any advice, many thanks.
    I may be wrong but I do not think there is a law which says your LL must replace that glass, unless it is in an HMO., or unless the glass pane were full-length. You could however use it as a bargaining point and call his bluff : unless you replace the glass, we will, regretfully, be unable to take this property. Make it clear to the dozy-sounding agent that this is the specific reason you are reluctant to take it and if you do not trust him to communicate that to the LL, write to the LL yourself if you have his contact details. I am sure he would want to know as he'd be a fool to lose a good T for the sake of £100 glazier's bill.

    If people are queuing up to rent the property however, and if it is otherwise your ideal home,you could be cutting off your nose to spite your face. It would cost very little to have the glass replaced yourself.
    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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      #3
      Thank you

      Thank you for your advice it's very much appreciated. We were thinking of replacing the door ourselves if allowed, if the landlord was unwilling to make the changes.

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        #4
        I recently let out a newly-acquired property for the first time, and it has what sounds like an identical problem with the back door. I was personally concerned about it too (this was before any tenant has seen it); although I couldn't find any regulations compelling me to change it I decided I should do so regardless. The pane of toughened glass cost £20-30 and another £10 for hardwood beading; no labour costs as I did the job myself.

        I don't think it's really a security issue though; in that toughened glass will still yield to a hammer or something, although it will take more of a knock than standard glass will. The point is that when toughened glass breaks, the whole pane shatters into tiny fragments which are pretty safe, as opposed to dagger-like shards you get with ordinary float glass.

        (As an aside, while I was doing the above work, another tradesman I had in the house at the time told me he thought I was absolutely right to change the glass, in that a few years previously his partner/workmate had witnessed someone falling through a similar door, and who bled to death in front of him. I don't mean to relate that to put the heebyjeebies up you, other than to say that I think you're absolutely right to press for it to be changed.)

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          #5
          When my kids were little I used Scotch window film on all the windows and doors. If they break it keeps all the glass between the film meaning no sharp edges for little ones to get hurt on.

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            #6
            Originally posted by kittikat View Post
            When my kids were little I used Scotch window film on all the windows and doors. If they break it keeps all the glass between the film meaning no sharp edges for little ones to get hurt on.
            That might be a useful interim measure, but the thin glass should really be replaced as soon as possible with toughened glass, as Eric advises.
            'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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