Suggestions on what else I can do regarding condensation/mould??

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    Suggestions on what else I can do regarding condensation/mould??

    Hello all

    I've just received a complaint re mould from the tenant of my ground floor flat. It was never a problem I encountered when I lived there, but when my first nightmarish tenant moved out, the master bedroom wall and living room wall were covered in it, but I thought it was due to her having open fish tanks and the heating on full pelt with the windows closed.

    I have read up on condensation and it does look like a "classic" case. It is in the bottom corner of the bedroom wall in a triangular pattern. The tenant had a chest of drawers pushed up against the wall where it is now mouldy. There is a dpc course installed and there are no drains etc outside the wall. I told my previous, and now this tenant, re opening windows for ventilation, keeping the place warm etc. Howvre I am not naive enough to think they were ever going to increase their heating bills to ventilate a rented property so I have supplied a good quality dehumidifier. My current tenant has chosen not to use it.

    The property is double glazed and has cavity wall insulation. It also has large radiators in every room, (except the master bedroom which has quite a long narrow one to fit under the large bay window so that room is colder than the rest) and when I lived there I tended to only keep the heating on very low as it was so easy to heat. The master bedroom has a huge bay window which did get covered in condensation every morning but I just used to wipe the window down when I got up. None of the windows have trickle vents. Does anyone know if it is possible to fit trickle vents in existing double glazed units? and do they actually make a difference? Also can anyone suggest any other steps I could take to limit the problem from my end? Perhaps put in more air bricks?

    #2
    This summer we internally insulated one wall in a bedroom that had really bad condensation in the winter. The house has no cavity, so we couldn’t do that. The room has double glazing with trickle vents, and an air vent. But the window in this room faces north.

    We dry lined the wall using insulation board. The link below explains how it is done. Look into the cost of doing this, it may be your cheapest option.

    http://www.diydoctor.org.uk/projects/drylining.htm

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      #3
      Originally posted by maxine View Post
      Hello all

      can anyone suggest any other steps I could take to limit the problem from my end? Perhaps put in more air bricks?
      Try Envirovent or Nuaire. (google them - both British firms) Apparently Councils use them when they get intransigent condensation issues with particular dwellings/teants.

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        #4
        Originally posted by Sad S View Post
        Try Envirovent or Nuaire. (google them - both British firms) Apparently Councils use them when they get intransigent condensation issues with particular dwellings/teants.
        Never mind intransigent tenants.

        I had success with putting in extractor fans with humidistats in place of the existing bathroom fans.

        http://www.plumbworld.co.uk/xpelair-...20t-1937-16394

        These aren't cheap. Over £160 each but well worth it. These worked well until my present tenants: I made the mistake of leaving the switch on the wall outside the bathroom accessible. You guessed it. They didn't like the noise and switched them off! Mould is now back.

        When this lot move out, I will be replacing the switch with a choc-blok and blanking plate.

        Another problem, which I have seen at another flat, is shower overspray. Tenants are often careless about positioning shower screens. If the water runs down the bath panel and soaks the floor, that can give the nightmare I have just encountered.
        To save them chiming in, JPKeates, Theartfullodger, Boletus, Mindthegap, Macromia, Holy Cow & Ted.E.Bear think the opposite of me on almost every subject.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by jamesknight0 View Post
          I had success with putting in extractor fans with humidistats in place of the existing bathroom fans.

          http://www.plumbworld.co.uk/xpelair-...20t-1937-16394

          These aren't cheap. Over £160 each but well worth it.
          Me too, but at significantly less cost: I've used this one, which at £33, just slotted in, in place of the old non-humidistat model.
          I made the mistake of leaving the switch on the wall outside the bathroom accessible. You guessed it. They didn't like the noise and switched them off!
          I just make it clear to new tenants that the reason it's there is to stop condensation/mould; that it's been proven to work over the years and that any condensation problems (which will only happen if the fan is overridden) will therefore be the tenant's responsibility. Seems to do the trick for me!

          When this lot move out, I will be replacing the switch with a choc-blok and blanking plate.
          Be aware that if you do you'll be breaking the electrical regs. Current regs are that an isolation switch should be fitted (if you a property is electrically tested it is always flagged as an issue if there's an extractor with no isolation switch); whereas there is no compulsion to fit one retrospectively, then if one's there it's not permitted to downgrade the safety by removing it. You could probably get away with moving the switch into the roof space, for example; but then you should also probably tell the tenants it's there!

          Comment


            #6
            there is now regulation in relation to adequate ventilation-this esp for property let to LA tenants
            Fit complaint electric ventilators in bathroom and kitchen
            Induct tenant into sensible use of accomm-ie dont overcrowd rooms
            dont put furniture (with no through vent) against external walls

            i own some ex loc flat in H&F -prone to condensation-fabric of building

            I find Dulux Cellar paint works for me-prep first

            Expensive ( £50 per 5ltr) but works


            hope this helps

            David Noble

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              #7
              thank you all for your suggestions - I will look into them and hopefully nip this problem in the bud

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                #8
                And, if not already there, install externally-vented tumble dryer. Tenants dry stuff on racks/radiators ain't good for your investment..
                I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by jamesknight0 View Post
                  Never mind intransigent tenants.
                  Surely you realise that landlords HAVE to mind tenants who are unwilling to change their behaviour.

                  It's in the landlord's interest to minimise the damage to his property by taking steps to remove the condensation caused by tenants' lifestyle.

                  So what ARE your solutions to expensive extractor fans which are switched off, airbricks which are blocked, shower screens and curtains which don't contain the water, condensing dryers which aren't used because tenants perceive them to be a reason for a higher electricity bills, windows which are never opened from October to March?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I was making a play on words, hence the smiley face. I just gave my solution above.
                    To save them chiming in, JPKeates, Theartfullodger, Boletus, Mindthegap, Macromia, Holy Cow & Ted.E.Bear think the opposite of me on almost every subject.

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