carpets

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    carpets

    I have rented a flat in an old regency house for the last year.

    The carpets in my flat are very worn and stained ..luckily the carpet is dark brown in colour so their not too visible and there is a tear in the hallway (which was there when I moved in) but is steadily getting bigger due to the fact it is a very small hallway and is the access point for every room in the flat.

    Then theres the floor boards which are obviously large squares of chipboard. They are becoming increasingly visible and some of them seem to be "lifting up" making the carpet look even worse.

    I have written two letters to my landlord asking for new carpets but so far I have been met with a wall of silence. I would much prefer a letter saying "no chance".

    If I were to buy new carpets and stick them over the old one (hopefully this would make the floorboards less visible) could I just rip them up and take them with me when I leave ???

    I had thought about offering to pay 50% of the cost but having no response I have thought better of this. but if I did who would the carpets belong too when I leave ??

    also... I have yet to have my gas heater checked (been here 15 months) should I remind the landlord, I also have no instruction manual for the heater.

    Sarah

    #2
    There is nothing to stop you acquiring some carpet and laying in on top of the worn carpet to which you object. You can then take it up when you leave, however "ripping" it up suggests that damage might be done when it is removed to which the landlord may have a valid objection.
    Offering to pay 50% towards new carpeting might get you some new stuff more quickly, but it would be up to negociation as to what would happen when you leave.

    If the gas heater has not been inspected by a Corgi registered gas engineer within the last 12 months who has handed you a safety certificate, your landlord is breaking the law and a polite letter is called for. If no action takes place then contact your local authority, the CAB or Shelter for advice as to what to do next.

    P.P.
    Any information given in this post is based on my personal experience as a landlord, what I have learned from this and other boards and elsewhere. It is not to be relied on. Definitive advice is only available from a Solicitor or other appropriately qualified person.

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks for the advice

      ...of course I meant just taking up the new carpets so that I leave the current carpet as it is.

      Sarah

      Comment


        #4
        'Scuse me but..................

        If this threadbare gungy brown carpet were to be covered over it doesn't really matter what damage was done to it if you laid over a better quality one as it has no commercial value.

        A landlord couldn't even do anything about it if they were completely ruined. I know the landlord might try to repalce it with a new one but the trick is to take a piece of it with you when you leave to show how poor it is/was. If it comes apart that easily how can the landlord prove it was of good quality?
        The advice I give should not be construed as a definitive answer, and is without prejudice or liability. You are advised to consult a specialist solicitor or other person of equal legal standing.

        Comment


          #5
          Surely that depends on what the inventory says, if the tenant blindly signed to say that the carpet was in good order, then that is the proof, if the tenant took a piece, whats to say that didnt come from somewhere else.
          The LL could surely deduct the cost of replacing the carpet based on its age, i.e. 20% of the new carpet costs?

          Comment


            #6
            Look! I'm an intelligent bloke.......

            Don't nitpick - I 'm quite aware of the inventory scenario, but a £50 carpet from Allied's "cut a bit off the big roll" that many landlord's use is not going to retain any value after 12-18 months, and any landlord who tries it on will be rather disappointed in front of a judge. Judges use a test of reasonableness to determine whether something has any merited value.
            The advice I give should not be construed as a definitive answer, and is without prejudice or liability. You are advised to consult a specialist solicitor or other person of equal legal standing.

            Comment


              #7
              LOOK! Im an intelligent bloke too

              And no one said you wasnt, dont get so upset. This is a forum and I really dont understand why people get so upset when questions/responses/opions are aired, isnt that the idea?

              Clearly you are a knowledgeable guy, but what you said fly's in the face of what I understand to be correct, therefore, Ill question it and not blindly go nodding my head ...... ITS A FORUM FOR GOD SAKE!

              Comment


                #8
                When you do upset me.............believe me you'll know!
                The advice I give should not be construed as a definitive answer, and is without prejudice or liability. You are advised to consult a specialist solicitor or other person of equal legal standing.

                Comment


                  #9
                  .. inventory says average condition but just looking at it you can see its a 'cheap' carpet.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Average condition is fairly meaningless as it doesn't state the condition of the carpet. It's so open to interpretaiton that the landlord would have to prove otherwise. It's not up to you to prove its condition at the outset in the event of a dispute so I would say your case would be very strong.
                    The advice I give should not be construed as a definitive answer, and is without prejudice or liability. You are advised to consult a specialist solicitor or other person of equal legal standing.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Paul - The condition of the carpet sounds below average!!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Careful...

                        Originally posted by P.Pilcher
                        There is nothing to stop you acquiring some carpet and laying in on top of the worn carpet to which you object. You can then take it up when you leave, however "ripping" it up suggests that damage might be done when it is removed to which the landlord may have a valid objection.
                        Just a thought which nobody seems to have considered... are there any doors which open over the carpetted area which Pagan is thinking about recovering (the front door almost certainly, I would have thought? Because by adding carpet rather than replacing it, the overall floor height will be raised, and the doors probably won't open - the cure is to cut or plane a bit off the bottom. However, because that will leave a significantly larger-than-normal gap when you revert to a single layer of carpet(!), the landlord might look to recover the costs of new doors from Pagan's deposit when she leaves.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          good point ... but ALL the doors have a large space between them and the carpet ... for some reason the front door doubley so ... maybe someone had previously covered the carpets ...I don't know

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