Furnished or unfurnished? What does 'furnished' include?

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  • pcwilkins
    replied
    Originally posted by juco12 View Post
    can I assume correctly that the `tenent` is responsible for the upkeep of the garden
    They are if you make them responsible in the agreement. They probably are even if you don't, but it's best to state these things.

    and do I have to supply any gardening tools?
    Not as far as I know. T is responsible for keeping the property clean as well, but you don't have to supply cleaning equipment. That said, most LLs will supply some equipment (like a lawnmower).

    Peter

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  • juco12
    replied
    Thanks for the replies, one other question, as this property has a garden can I assume correctly that the `tenent` is responsible for the upkeep of the garden and do I have to supply any gardening tools?

    thanks
    Juco

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  • bagpuss
    replied
    Decide what you're willing to provide re white goods but if possible check with tenants as to what they will need/expect. We bought a cooker for one unfurnished property as there wasn't one there and when we found tenants they wanted to put their own in, so we ended up with a brand new unwanted cooker. We will make use of it eventually, but it's a cautionary tale......

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  • Surrey
    replied
    I don't know if there are any clear rules, particularly with regard to Scottish law, but it is customary to provide cooker, washing machine and fridge, sometimes fridge-freezer or separate freezer depending on the layout of the property. I have found a dishwasher to be a complete pain in the bum to include in a let, being called to get it fixed when all it needed was for tenants to keep the filter thing clean is such a drag!

    You can be flexible and let prospective tenants know that if they don't want to use your fridge/washing machine if they'd rather use their own that you will move it (but don't offer to reduce the rent, you'll still have to find somewhere to put it in the meantime!) and that they will be responsible for ensuring that it is fitted correctly and doesn't damage the property with leaks, etc in the case of the washing machine.

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  • juco12
    replied
    What is included in 'unfurnished' property?

    I am currently refurbishing a 2 bed property (Scotland) and plan to rent unfurnished.
    I will have redecorated and have elec and gas tested. there will be a new kitchen installed with oven,hob and washing machine. All rooms will be carpeted and have blinds on the windows.
    Are there any items that would normally be included in an unfurnished rental,
    for example a fridge / freezer?
    Anything I am missing?

    thanks

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  • tipsarooni
    replied
    Thankyou for your advice. and the link for my questions.
    With regards HMO, i thought the property had to be 3 floors AND 5 or more people? Mine is 2 floors and a max of 4 people. (in Manchester). I have read stuff on this forum re HMO - it is all a bit confusing!
    I do keep seeing different things about whether or not my particular property would apply.

    As for furnishings, the majority of the rooms have varnished floors (with no rugs). I'd like to keep it that way but i guess i need to consider the wear and tear on them.

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  • Ericthelobster
    replied
    Before you go any further....

    You say you want to rent to four sharers - if so that would make your property an HMO (House (Home?) of Multiple Occupation) which means that all sorts of legislation applies, like fire regs, getting a license, etc etc which may welll be prohibitive for you - read up on all this. If you let to, say, a family, then HMO regs don't apply.

    Furnished vs unfurnished? Difficult to say; there's no easy answer. Depends largely on local conditions; eg if you're letting to students, they are unlikely to have their own furniture, whereas with a long-term let to a family they probably will.

    You might consider you're more likely to get a longer term let if you let unfurnished, as tenants are less likely to want to move on a whim if they need to shift a houseful of gear.

    Have a look in local letting agencies and get a feel for whether most of the direct competition is let furnished or not.

    Also consider fire regs here - any soft furnishings must have the appropriate label to show that they are made of the appropriate fire-retardant material.

    I think it's fair to say that the extra rent you'll take for a furnished let over an unfurnished let will be pretty small - certainly not enough to cover the cost of buying and maintaining a houseful of furniture.

    Personally I let 'part-furnished' which most people interpret as being with carpets and curtains, plus maybe some white goods in the kitchen. Don't consider letting without floor coverings (especially) or curtains, as no tenant is going to want to spend large amounts of dosh on items which will only fit your property.

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  • tipsarooni
    replied
    Furnished Requirements

    Hi,
    I am looking to rent out my old house for the first time. It was on the market for sale but with no interest. I've done lots of research and reading about letting your property.
    Could anyone offer any advice on what furniture / equipment etc I should provide for tenant? it is a four bedroom house and i will be hoping to get four people to share it.
    Are there any set minimum requirements that would constitute the term "furnished"? I just dont know whether to provide lots of "nice to have's" to make it look more attractive to potential tenants. Or to have the bare minimum thus less to account for breakages etc.

    Please can i ask what peoples experiences are and any advice that you may be able to give?

    Thankyou

    Leave a comment:


  • pcwilkins
    replied
    Originally posted by J4L View Post
    One thing I forgot to mention was that a landlord I know has left things like fridge freezer, cooker etc but has stated in the inventory and the tenant agreement that he will leave these items but doesn't want or to become responsible if the items fail or need repair. That he is happy for the tenant to dispose of them if this happens but they will be liable for any disposal costs or repair costs if they decide to have them repaired.
    Dunno how legal this is but I guess if it's stated from the off it should be ok.

    Shouldn't it??
    Not unnecessarily. Our tenancy agreement states that the L is responsible for keeping in working order "all appliances supplied with the property". This would include all appliances, even if not on the inventory. The wording of the agreement could be changed to exclude items not on the inventory.

    However, as far as I am aware all items supplied with the property have to be safety checked even if they are left "as a gift". It is far safer to dispose of an item if you do not want responsibility for it.

    After all, in the example above there would seem little incentive for the landlord to leave the appliances. He cannot increase the rent because they are there, because that would be construed as them being supplied as part of the rent, so he gains no financial benefit. And if those items cause a fire or electrocute the tenant, he will be held responsible whatever the TA/inventory say.

    The same applies for furniture. It has to meet fire regulations even if the L claims it is a gift.

    We had a dispute with our landlord about a year ago when our washing machine broke down. It was installed when we moved in, but the L claimed it was left "as a gift" and therefore it was our responsibility. I claimed that because of the clause I quote above, they were responsible whether it was "a gift" or not. It turned out that the term "as a gift" was meaningless --- if an item is supplied by the landlord for the tenant's use, the landlord was responsible for it. It turned out that the machine was on the inventory, despite L's claim that it wasn't, but even if it hadn't been I would have still maintained they had to fix/replace it.

    Conclusion --- if you don't want to be responsible for an item, get rid of it!!! One alternative might be to sell it to the tenant for a small sum and get a receipt to confirm that ownership of said items is transferred from L to T.

    Peter

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  • J4L
    replied
    haha.
    Oh some people tickle me esio!

    One thing I forgot to mention was that a landlord I know has left things like fridge freezer, cooker etc but has stated in the inventory and the tenant agreement that he will leave these items but doesn't want or to become responsible if the items fail or need repair. That he is happy for the tenant to dispose of them if this happens but they will be liable for any disposal costs or repair costs if they decide to have them repaired.
    Dunno how legal this is but I guess if it's stated from the off it should be ok.

    Shouldn't it??

    Leave a comment:


  • Esio Trot
    replied
    We had a landlord who did his own inventory. He really went OTT. For example, amongst the things expected to be listed in the understairs cupboard he had:

    Yellow Dusters - 6
    Rubber Gloves - Large and Medium - 1 pair each (used)
    Feather Duster
    Wooden Clothes Pegs - 2 dozen
    Fusewire (part used)
    Dustpan and Brush - Blue Plastic (Crack in handle of Dustpan)

    His property was Fully Furnished, and the inventory ran to 22 pages!!

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  • pcwilkins
    replied
    Originally posted by armadillo View Post
    Hi,

    I am emigrating shortly and want to let my flat as furnished.

    Any advice on what I should/shouldnt leave?
    Would advise "partly furnished" --- just leave large items such as furniture + kitchen appliances + possibly TV.

    I assumed originally that the more the better as it would be a "selling" point to get a tennant
    It would make your property more attractive to some but less attractive to others. I'm not sure what proportion of tenants have their own furniture --- we do, and a lot of other people I know would only take an unfurnished property as they have their own "stuff". I suggest that if your property is in the right area at the right price, furnished/unfurnished probably doesn't make a great deal of difference. Furnishing a property is surprisingly cheap anyway.

    however I have been told that I will have to replace all items included in the inventory if they break. Is this right?....and if so should I remove unnecessary items?

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  • J4L
    replied
    I think your playing with fire here Armadillo by advertising as fully furnished

    Yes, if items you list on the inventory break you will be liable to replace them.
    Some people's views on fully furnished are knives, forks, TV's DVD's etc etc so I'd be tempted to advertise as part-furnished and make sure you do a very thorough inventory.
    Remember though, the more items you leave the more can go wrong! so your increasing the chances of this Let costing you money. I'd probably sell everything and let as unfurnished.
    If you do leave things make sure you get a responsible person or an agent to manage this whilst your away.

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  • armadillo
    replied
    Furnished let - what should I include?

    Hi,

    I am emigrating shortly and want to let my flat as furnished.

    Any advice on what I should/shouldnt leave?

    I assumed originally that the more the better as it would be a "selling" point to get a tennant however I have been told that I will have to replace all items included in the inventory if they break. Is this right?....and if so should I remove unnecessary items?

    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • J4L
    replied
    Methinks the best way to advertise this is PART-furnished and then you can put in whatever you like.
    I recall reading somewhere that if you state that a property is furnished you are liable for nearly every eventuality such as cutlery and the such.

    Leave a comment:

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