Furnished or unfurnished? What does 'furnished' include?

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    #31
    Peter Owen case

    As far as I'm concerned it's your property and you can advertise it as you please. If you were to empty your house of furniture it would attract more tenants as most people have collected things of their own over the years. If the property was also empty AND had no furniture, you may be exempt from Council Tax for 6 months

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      #32
      Diddled has a very good point on the council tax. I rent my flats out unfurnished, but do keep some odds and ends in my garage to give to tenants if they need a little kitchen table or chair etc.
      ASSUME NOTHING - QUESTION EVERYTHING!

      Comment


        #33
        That is a very interesting way of getting round council tax and still being able to give tenants some bits and bobs if they need it.. So by having an empty unfurnished house but keeping stuff in the garage you can avoid the tax? I did not know that.. Great tip guys..!

        Comment


          #34
          Originally posted by richardbarnes View Post
          This is my first let!

          I have advertised my property furnished, but prospective tenants have been asking for unfurnished. Does it effect legalities if the property is unfurnished.
          Does it change anything apart from no furnishings.

          Regards Richard

          Legally: no.There used to be different legislative rules, in the days of the Rent Act, varying between furnished and unfurnished. There is no such difference for tenancies under the Housing Act 1988.
          JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
          1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
          2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
          3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
          4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

          Comment


            #35
            Just how far do i go to let "furnished"

            Ive always let my house unfurnished, but my current tenants (a company who's men are working in my area) asked for furnished.

            Ive put beds, wardrobes, fridge/freezer, washing machine, dining table/chairs,microwave, kettle, pans, crockery, cutlery, vacuum cleaner, 2 and 3 seater sofas, tv, video and dvd player in. The kitchen has built in oven and hob. I refused to supply bedding and towels.

            Ive now been asked to supply a mirror in bathroom (for shaving) and ironing board and iron.

            These items are not particularly costly but im worried about where it will end.

            Just wondered what the norm is when "furnishing"?

            Thanx

            Comment


              #36
              Originally posted by cdpaul View Post
              Ive always let my house unfurnished, but my current tenants (a company who's men are working in my area) asked for furnished.

              Ive put beds, wardrobes, fridge/freezer, washing machine, dining table/chairs,microwave, kettle, pans, crockery, cutlery, vacuum cleaner, 2 and 3 seater sofas, tv, video and dvd player in. The kitchen has built in oven and hob. I refused to supply bedding and towels.

              Ive now been asked to supply a mirror in bathroom (for shaving) and ironing board and iron.

              These items are not particularly costly but im worried about where it will end.

              Just wondered what the norm is when "furnishing"?

              Thanx
              If a tenant wants furnished accommodation so you put more and more furnishings in your property:
              a. it's much more lettable; but
              b. you run much more risk. Not every T will make off with your goods, allow babies/pets to excrete on them, or set fire to them. However, accidental damage is always a possibility.
              One alternative is to let it unfurnished but to offer to source furnishings if T pays for them. That way, they belong to T (or you could even formally sell - and T could buy - your contents).
              However, isn't the Co. your tenant? If so, and - of course - it's therefore not an AST - the Co. is responsible for your contents even if its subtenants/licensees cause the loss of these.
              JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
              1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
              2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
              3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
              4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

              Comment


                #37
                I always offer an ironing board, whether fully furnished or not...since it stops tenants ironing on the carpet.


                but i make a point of not offering irons or saucepans, since peoples choices of these can vary greatly....stainless steel or non-stick, steam iron or not etc, and these things get very easily damaged. Also i never offer any bedding for hygene - only a mattress with a new mattress cover for each tenancy.

                hope this helps

                Comment


                  #38
                  Methinks the best way to advertise this is PART-furnished and then you can put in whatever you like.
                  I recall reading somewhere that if you state that a property is furnished you are liable for nearly every eventuality such as cutlery and the such.
                  Ambition is Critical

                  I don't profess to be a knowledge in all areas, my advice is based on life experience.

                  Comment


                    #39
                    Furnished let - what should I include?

                    Hi,

                    I am emigrating shortly and want to let my flat as furnished.

                    Any advice on what I should/shouldnt leave?

                    I assumed originally that the more the better as it would be a "selling" point to get a tennant however I have been told that I will have to replace all items included in the inventory if they break. Is this right?....and if so should I remove unnecessary items?

                    Thanks

                    Comment


                      #40
                      I think your playing with fire here Armadillo by advertising as fully furnished

                      Yes, if items you list on the inventory break you will be liable to replace them.
                      Some people's views on fully furnished are knives, forks, TV's DVD's etc etc so I'd be tempted to advertise as part-furnished and make sure you do a very thorough inventory.
                      Remember though, the more items you leave the more can go wrong! so your increasing the chances of this Let costing you money. I'd probably sell everything and let as unfurnished.
                      If you do leave things make sure you get a responsible person or an agent to manage this whilst your away.
                      Ambition is Critical

                      I don't profess to be a knowledge in all areas, my advice is based on life experience.

                      Comment


                        #41
                        Originally posted by armadillo View Post
                        Hi,

                        I am emigrating shortly and want to let my flat as furnished.

                        Any advice on what I should/shouldnt leave?
                        Would advise "partly furnished" --- just leave large items such as furniture + kitchen appliances + possibly TV.

                        I assumed originally that the more the better as it would be a "selling" point to get a tennant
                        It would make your property more attractive to some but less attractive to others. I'm not sure what proportion of tenants have their own furniture --- we do, and a lot of other people I know would only take an unfurnished property as they have their own "stuff". I suggest that if your property is in the right area at the right price, furnished/unfurnished probably doesn't make a great deal of difference. Furnishing a property is surprisingly cheap anyway.

                        however I have been told that I will have to replace all items included in the inventory if they break. Is this right?....and if so should I remove unnecessary items?

                        Comment


                          #42
                          We had a landlord who did his own inventory. He really went OTT. For example, amongst the things expected to be listed in the understairs cupboard he had:

                          Yellow Dusters - 6
                          Rubber Gloves - Large and Medium - 1 pair each (used)
                          Feather Duster
                          Wooden Clothes Pegs - 2 dozen
                          Fusewire (part used)
                          Dustpan and Brush - Blue Plastic (Crack in handle of Dustpan)

                          His property was Fully Furnished, and the inventory ran to 22 pages!!
                          On some things I am very knowledgeable, on other things I am stupid. Trouble is, sometimes I discover that the former is the latter or vice versa, and I don't know this until later - maybe even much later. Because of the number of posts I have done, I am now a Senior Member. However, read anything I write with the above in mind.

                          Comment


                            #43
                            haha.
                            Oh some people tickle me esio!

                            One thing I forgot to mention was that a landlord I know has left things like fridge freezer, cooker etc but has stated in the inventory and the tenant agreement that he will leave these items but doesn't want or to become responsible if the items fail or need repair. That he is happy for the tenant to dispose of them if this happens but they will be liable for any disposal costs or repair costs if they decide to have them repaired.
                            Dunno how legal this is but I guess if it's stated from the off it should be ok.

                            Shouldn't it??
                            Ambition is Critical

                            I don't profess to be a knowledge in all areas, my advice is based on life experience.

                            Comment


                              #44
                              Originally posted by J4L View Post
                              One thing I forgot to mention was that a landlord I know has left things like fridge freezer, cooker etc but has stated in the inventory and the tenant agreement that he will leave these items but doesn't want or to become responsible if the items fail or need repair. That he is happy for the tenant to dispose of them if this happens but they will be liable for any disposal costs or repair costs if they decide to have them repaired.
                              Dunno how legal this is but I guess if it's stated from the off it should be ok.

                              Shouldn't it??
                              Not unnecessarily. Our tenancy agreement states that the L is responsible for keeping in working order "all appliances supplied with the property". This would include all appliances, even if not on the inventory. The wording of the agreement could be changed to exclude items not on the inventory.

                              However, as far as I am aware all items supplied with the property have to be safety checked even if they are left "as a gift". It is far safer to dispose of an item if you do not want responsibility for it.

                              After all, in the example above there would seem little incentive for the landlord to leave the appliances. He cannot increase the rent because they are there, because that would be construed as them being supplied as part of the rent, so he gains no financial benefit. And if those items cause a fire or electrocute the tenant, he will be held responsible whatever the TA/inventory say.

                              The same applies for furniture. It has to meet fire regulations even if the L claims it is a gift.

                              We had a dispute with our landlord about a year ago when our washing machine broke down. It was installed when we moved in, but the L claimed it was left "as a gift" and therefore it was our responsibility. I claimed that because of the clause I quote above, they were responsible whether it was "a gift" or not. It turned out that the term "as a gift" was meaningless --- if an item is supplied by the landlord for the tenant's use, the landlord was responsible for it. It turned out that the machine was on the inventory, despite L's claim that it wasn't, but even if it hadn't been I would have still maintained they had to fix/replace it.

                              Conclusion --- if you don't want to be responsible for an item, get rid of it!!! One alternative might be to sell it to the tenant for a small sum and get a receipt to confirm that ownership of said items is transferred from L to T.

                              Peter

                              Comment


                                #45
                                Furnished Requirements

                                Hi,
                                I am looking to rent out my old house for the first time. It was on the market for sale but with no interest. I've done lots of research and reading about letting your property.
                                Could anyone offer any advice on what furniture / equipment etc I should provide for tenant? it is a four bedroom house and i will be hoping to get four people to share it.
                                Are there any set minimum requirements that would constitute the term "furnished"? I just dont know whether to provide lots of "nice to have's" to make it look more attractive to potential tenants. Or to have the bare minimum thus less to account for breakages etc.

                                Please can i ask what peoples experiences are and any advice that you may be able to give?

                                Thankyou

                                Comment

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