Furnished or unfurnished? What does 'furnished' include?

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  • Ericthelobster
    replied
    Totally agree with everything PP says.

    By the way - yes, cooker+white goods would be part-furnished.

    Personally I let part-furnished (with cooker/oven/hob and fridge/freezer) but don't include a washing machine or dishwasher as they are pretty likely to go wrong, especially when subjected to "tenant abuse" - I let tenants provide their own.

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  • P.Pilcher
    replied
    It depends on your market. some potential types of tenants - for example students - expect the premises they rent to be furnished, but in my experience with most of the tenants I have had over the years furniture is more trouble than it is worth. First of course much of the furniture must meet the fire regulations if supplied by the landlord. White goods must be maintained by the landlord and quite often I have had tenants contact me to say that they were acquiring some furniture themselves, so could you please remove this, that or the whole lot! Furthermore there appears in the main to be little difference in market rents between furnished and unfurnished properties. I now merely supply curtains, carpets, cooker and everything else is down to the tenant. Much less hassle that way.

    P.P.

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  • junglejim
    replied
    furnished or unfurnished

    Hello all,

    Just about to embark on my first investment property. What are the pros, cons of furnished or unfurnished?
    I am thinking of providing cooker and white goods, does this mean the property can be advertised as part furnished?
    Any comments gratefully accepted.

    Leave a comment:


  • prettyinpink7890
    replied
    Thanks Jonboy! I did a crash course in the pros and cons of being a landlord yesterday by looking over the site in preparation of my prospective tenant coming to view. I definitely want to minimise the chance of any horror stories for me.

    Anyway, the prospective tenant said yes, he wants the house, so I sent him away with a TenantVerify application form to complete and return. I plan to do the Comprehensive Check with References.

    At this stage is there anything else you recommend I do? He's (allegedly) a professional working locally for a multi-national on a 18 month contract. First impressions (both on the phone and face to face) were good and he seems to be saying the right things. He didn't baulk when I said I would do a credit check and he offered to pay one month's rent and bond up front in cash if I preferred. Apparently he's rented for years (to tie in with where his contracts are in the world) so is definitely more au fait with how it all works than me. (I'm renting out my own house to move into larger rented accommodation with my partner and children.)

    I feel much better knowing that if I have any questions I can post them to this forum and one of you very helpful people will be on hand for support and advice.

    Thanks everyone.

    PiP x

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  • Ericthelobster
    replied
    Originally posted by prettyinpink7890
    I'm quite clear on what constitutes "unfurnished" (carpets, curtains and cooker).
    Actually, no you're not clear! In rental parlance, "unfurnished" means the walls have been plastered and that's about it. No carpets, curtains or white goods. There's little or no demand for unfurnished property in the short-term AST market. What you have currently is normally described as "part-furnished", although I don't think the IR makes any distinction.

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  • Worldlife
    replied
    You might find the Inland Revenue definition helpful

    Furnished property
    To be classed as furnished the property must comply with the Stamp Office definition of "furnished" which is in accordance with that used by other departments of the Inland Revenue, meaning that the tenant can move into the property without having to take with him any furniture at all. The propertyshould therefore contain as a minimum such items as a sofa, one or more beds,plus a dining table and chairs, a cooker, carpets, curtains and other whitegoods in the kitchen. If the property only contains curtains, carpets and whitegoods in the kitchen this would not be classed as a furnished property.
    I do not provide a television, video, dvd player, stereo, bedding, towels or garden tools.

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  • prettyinpink7890
    replied
    Furnished or unfurnished? What does 'furnished' include?

    Hi Everyone

    I'm completely new to this. Can you help please? Although I've advertised my house to let unfurnished, I've had some interest in it as furnished. I'm quite clear on what constitutes "unfurnished" (carpets, curtains and cooker). However, I'm not so clear on what constitutes "furnished".

    Am I right in thinking that it includes carpets, curtains, white goods (cooker/fridge/washer/microwave), kitchen utensils (crockery/cutlery/kettle/toaster), furniture (table/chairs/sofa/beds/wardrobes). Am I also required to provide a television, video, dvd player, stereo, bedding, towels, garden tools?

    Apologies if this is a daft question!

    Thanks for your help.

    PiP x

    Leave a comment:


  • MrShed
    replied
    Just a small point sidam. Unfortunately for you, if the tenants are going to sue anyone it HAS to be yourself as the landlord - this they will find out either when they consult with a legal professional, or attempt to sue the agent and have it thrown out. The agent and tenants have no ties, in effect. All legal responsibility falls upon you as the landlord with regards to the tenants. Of course, this does not mean that you cannot subsequently sue the agent for these losses.

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  • sidam
    replied
    Thanks for your help. The tenants are also going to sue the Agency; and I have decided to part ways with the agency too. This will entail a lot of learning I suppose...my main aim would be to keep the agency and their manegment co from taking/keeping any of my money. to start....Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • MrShed
    replied
    Well....quite a complex little situation here! The tenants want to move out, this is the first thing to deal with. They may have little actual legal backing to do so, as there is no difference, legally, between a furnished and unfurnished flat. However, it could potentially fall under false advertising laws. But....legally and morally are two completely different things, and I believe that in this situation, you should agree to let them cancel the AST and move out. Then persue this financial loss against the agent, as I believe they are almost totally at fault.

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  • sidam
    replied
    Hello there and thanks for replying. Our first tenancy was unfurnished but we left a few things for the tenants ie book shelves buffet sideboard, glass case, and two sofas etc...but no bed and no table and chairs. The management company later at the end of this tenancy advertised the flat as furnished even though there was no bed and no table and chairs. The letting negotiator seems not to have known what stuff was ours because the company has lost the inventory. This we only learned at check out time. The new tenants believe they have let a fully furnished flat. Our agents say they probably won't stay long. At the changeover these poor folks were checked into to a dirty flat ( this is actually confirmed by the checkin report itself. ). It also appears the leeting compamy asked the former tenants to leave their bed, which they did. This bed was according to the new tenants dirty etc.... We had no idea this was going on. The agency told us a bed had been left in the flat and that we should charge the former tenants for the removal. It's a b..... mess, and we feel the agency should be held accountabler for not informing us of the missing inventory, and for representing the flat as furnished without consultation. We now have to travel to the UK to meet up with all irate parties, which includes us. Thanks for any advice. Gayle

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  • MrShed
    replied
    What furniture is in the flat now then? You said in your first tenancy there were no beds supplied, is this still the case?

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  • sidam
    replied
    Let flat: is it part-furnished or unfurnished?

    We have been living abroad a little over a year and we are already into our second tenancy. Without consultation, our letting agent decided that this time round he would advertise our flat as furnished. In our first tenancy it was let unfurnished (or rather part-furnished); but we left a few items behind at the request of the tenants. We left 2 sofas, a few bookcases, a buffet, a glass case; microwave, freeview box etc. There was however, no table and chairs and no bed.
    The agent says contractually there is no difference between furnished or unfurnished, which is why we did nt know of this change- ie it was not noted in the contract. The definition of 'furnished' according to the agent is: a place to sit, a place to store and a place to sleep. He says that there was enough furniture in the flat to deem it furnished. Our new tenants don't agree: they believed it was fully furnished having seen it with the previous occupants things and now want to move. Who is at fault?
    thanks

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  • MrShed
    replied
    If you find someone willing to move into an unfurnished property, then do so. Reasons:

    - As PP says, tenants moving into unfurnished property tend to stay for a considerably longer time, as they have some kind of tie to the property.

    - Again, as PP says, prevents some paperwork with inventory etc. Also, limits your liability to less items in the property, almost to just structural issues and certain fittings. You don't have to replace/repair/maintain white goods etc.

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  • P.Pilcher
    replied
    Apart from curtains and carpets, I avoid furnishing a property like the plague! Apart from checking that the furniture meets the fireproofing regulations, and additional efforts are needed in providing an inventory, I have, in the past, had tenants who are grateful for a furnished property then, half way through their tenancy promptly want my furniture removed so that they can move their own in! In addition, there is much more effort involved in moving furniture in and out of a property so I hope that this induces my tenants to stay for a longer period.

    P.P.

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