Third party entry to home - what can I do, if anything?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Third party entry to home - what can I do, if anything?

    Hi,

    I recently got a letter from the council saying one of the residents in the community where I rent a home has said they think some alterations to the property have been made without council consent.

    This is true. It happened before I bought the place, but that's life.

    The council wrote to me and said they would like to see if this is true. They want to visit the property to ascertain whether this is the case. They outlined what they thought the changes were in some detail.

    I wrote to the council (proof of postage) and left a voicemail on the direct line of the person who wrote to me during working hours (he wasn't at his desk i presume, and no email address was supplied) and told them that what they suspected was indeed true. Therefore no visit need be made, i will work with them to fix it, let me know what to do next. I'm happy to work with them etc etc but there is no need to go round.

    Despite this, they went round anyway, randomly, didn't tell me the date, time, nothing. My tenants felt intimidated and let this man in to inspect the place.

    But, they have since complained to me because of lack of notice. They didn't like the intimidation, the council worker completely put the heeby jeebies up them with his tales of wrongdoings, and they are considering leaving. Not least because these tenants confided to me that because of their history, where possible, a female third party should visit the home.

    So frankly, I totally understand them. I am furious with the council and more than a little sickened. I haven't said anything yet because I need to be calm, composed and support my argument when I put it to them.

    Are they able to act this way? Advice anyone.

    #2
    As a Local Authority, the Council may have powers of entry- but, almost always, they have to notify the occupant in advance.
    T has no grounds to complain against you, as L.
    JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
    1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
    2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
    3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
    4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Conflicted View Post

      Are they able to act this way? Advice anyone.
      At the end of the day, the tenants let them in.

      The council would have used fancy words, and said they have more powers than they actually do, but they'll deny they were out of order with how they gained entry.
      Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

      Comment


        #4
        Is that the case even though I notified them that there was no need to go round? And they never told me when?

        In that case, I can't ever stop them from going to the property / tenants' place? A man from the council can just turn up at the door anytime and say they have to be let in.

        Bloody ridiculous.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Conflicted View Post
          Is that the case even though I notified them that there was no need to go round? And they never told me when?

          In that case, I can't ever stop them from going to the property / tenants' place? A man from the council can just turn up at the door anytime and say they have to be let in.

          Bloody ridiculous.
          Only in the same way that a bloke from the bread shop can call at your house and say you have to let them in. The tenant has every right to say 'go away' - exactly as they would have to if they owned the property themselves.

          I understand that the lady tenant has problems with visitors, but this is out of your control and you really can't act in loco parentis for the tenants.

          Comment


            #6
            Bread shops have no statutory powers. Local Authorities have some, at least.
            JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
            1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
            2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
            3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
            4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

            Comment


              #7
              Bread shops? Complete thing of the past where I live! Tescos rules here.

              My ire is quite firmly rooted in the irony that the nature of the tenancy is sensitive for a related reason. I completely cooperate, but this bully just does what he wants anyway. I'm sure he had no idea of the gravity of the situation, but that is not the point at all. He just wanted to say 'oh yes I can come round'.

              I'm going to have to say something because I really don't want this to happen again. I asked for the policies and procedures guidelines from the council today and I'll see what that says.

              Comment

              Latest Activity

              Collapse

              Working...
              X