who is responsible for blocked sink

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    #16
    Originally posted by remyrobson View Post
    A few months ago a student T rang, text and emailed me 'urgently'. It seemed that one of his mates had poured oil from his frying pan down the sink and now it was all blocked up...
    I advised a kettle full of boiling water to start with followed by the soda crystal solution and to their surprise it cleared up a treat! I dread to think what kind of problems they will have when they have their own property.
    Just hope that they don't buy the flat upstairs from yours.
    JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
    1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
    2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
    3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
    4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

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      #17
      Originally posted by remyrobson View Post
      A few months ago a student T rang, text and emailed me 'urgently'. It seemed that one of his mates had poured oil from his frying pan down the sink and now it was all blocked up...
      I advised a kettle full of boiling water to start with followed by the soda crystal solution and to their surprise it cleared up a treat! I dread to think what kind of problems they will have when they have their own property.
      They'll probably be OK by then, having made all their mistakes on your property first! When we first presented a complimentary sink plunger to one of our student tenants on Day One in the house, he looked terrified and said he'd never seen one of those before. (He told us afterwards that he had thought it was some kind of bizarre sexual aid we were offering him).
      'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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        #18
        Good job that you didn't supply him with a garden hose, then.
        JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
        1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
        2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
        3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
        4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

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          #19
          Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
          Good job that you didn't supply him with a garden hose, then.

          Ummm! I've led a sheltered life, what can you do with a garden hose?
          I offer no guarantee that anything I say is correct. wysiwyg

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            #20
            If Lord Denning said: "He must unstop the sink when it is blocked by his waste" we need go no further - except to home in on the words "his".

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              #21
              Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
              If Lord Denning said: "He must unstop the sink when it is blocked by his waste" we need go no further - except to home in on the words "his".
              Why? T was male. 'His' is a masculine pronoun, after all.
              JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
              1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
              2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
              3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
              4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

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                #22
                Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
                Why? T was male. 'His' is a masculine pronoun, after all.
                What I mean is that a tenant is only responsible for unstopping the sink when it is blocked by his waste, and not anyone else's.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
                  What I mean is that a tenant is only responsible for unstopping the sink when it is blocked by his waste, and not anyone else's.
                  The origins and thus the ownership of kitchen sink waste is indeed a knotty problem, both scientifically and legally.
                  'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                    The origins and thus the ownership of kitchen sink waste is indeed a knotty problem, both scientifically and legally.
                    I think though that we can safely say that a former tenant who on vacating failed to give notice of any interest therein can be deemed to have abandoned the same and any right thereto. We could go on to consider whether it is a fixture or fitting and if we decide that it is, then it forms part of the property and belongs to the landlord. That would in turn leave an incoming tenant with the need to seek the landlord's consent to its removal and directions as to its disposal.

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                      #25
                      Hi, in relation to this thread:
                      I'm a landlord and I have just paid for the second time in 6 months, for a plumber to unblock bath due to excessive buildup of hair in the pipe.
                      4 girls, all with long hair life in a the flat and after the first time I suggested they use a strainer which they bought but the problem has happened again. I feel that they are not vigilant in taking hair out after showers or brushing before showering. I have decided to deduct the amount from their deposit (but pay a fifth as a gesture of goodwill) as it has coincided with the end of their tenancy.
                      I have now received a what could only be described as a threatening letter from one of the tenants parents (in Poland, a property developer/CEO), mentioning laws suits etc.
                      Where do I stand legally, I really feel it's the tenants responsibility - why should I pay to unblock their hair every 6 months - this has never happened before in over 10 years of renting the property.

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                        #26
                        The deposit is the tenant's money, not yours, and (presumably) in a protection scheme so that deductions may only be made with agreement of all parties or after adjudication.

                        In your shoes, unless the bath is prone to blockages (in which case re-plumb,,) I'd suggest either try to arrive at a compromise & gain promises of hair-management or evict.

                        A cunning lawyer could point out you (or through your agent you..) agreed to 4 long-haired ladies taking the property, presumably without imposing/agreeing special conditions, so ...
                        I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

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