deposit deduction for damages - should i allow for wear and tear also?

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    deposit deduction for damages - should i allow for wear and tear also?

    Hi there, just wondered if anyone could give me some advice. I have some tenants who have rented a flat from me for 2 yrs. They have moved out and unfortunately left the sofabed in really bad condition. The cushions and arms are ripped and one of the arms has a hole (about 25cm2) with a huge chunk of the foam ripped out down to the core of the sofa. When the tenants arrived the sofa was not new but in good condition, it had no wearing, no rips, stains nothing. The tenants were always great and so I just want to make sure that I am giving them a fair deal as unfortunately I have discovered that having the sofa recovered costs their entire deposit (minimum 1200pounds). Should I make any allowance for the sofa not being brand new at the time they moved in or does the fact that it was in good condition (they have acknowledged this verbally and on the inventory) mean that they should just cover entirely the cost of recovering? Thanks.

    #2
    you should of course account for fair wear and tear but this sounds above and beyond what is expected.

    Was there a full inventory for the property when they moved in and was it signed? Did you register their deposit in a scheme?

    £1200 sounds an excessive amount to have a sofa recovered - what was the cost of the sofa originally?

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      #3
      yes, we did an inventory which was signed by everyone, and the deposit was registered. I thought it was a lot too but i got three quotes to compare and unfortunately that was the cheapest of them! I wasn't involved with the original purchase but to replace with the same quality of sofa would be around 2k, it has feather stuffed cushions etc. rather than foam, and plus it's a sofa bed...

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        #4
        You do need to take into account it's age now, and it's expected lifespan.

        This is a calculation I posted on here earlier - it was for a carpet, but the principles are the same...
        1. Cost new (£500)
        2. Expected Lifespan (5 years)
        3. Age at end of tenancy (3 years)
        Divide 1 by 2 to get a value per year for the carpet - £100 in this case. Then work out the life that has been lost by taking 3 from 2 - 2 years in this case. Therefore, the deposit value is the remaining life (2 years) multiplied by the yearly value (£100) - £200.

        A quality carpet where the figures are £1200, 15 years, 3 years would produce a much higher figure of £960.

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          #5
          wow, that is really helpful. thank you v much!!

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