Tenant Damage

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    Tenant Damage

    I am a landlord. I let my own home to a tenant who caused considerable damage. The tenants new address is unknown but I have the address of her guarantor. I would like to know answers to the following:
    1. Can I take the guarantor to court as I have no address details for the tenant?
    2. Do I have to carry out the repairs or will quotations for intended work be sufficient?
    3. How many quotations are required for each problem (eg decorating, carpentry, electrical etc.)?
    4. How long after the tenancy ended do I have to take the matter to court?
    Thank you in anticipation of your reply.
    ubt

    #2
    Originally posted by ubt View Post
    I am a landlord. I let my own home to a tenant who caused considerable damage. The tenants new address is unknown but I have the address of her guarantor. I would like to know answers to the following:
    1. Can I take the guarantor to court as I have no address details for the tenant?
    2. Do I have to carry out the repairs or will quotations for intended work be sufficient?
    3. How many quotations are required for each problem (eg decorating, carpentry, electrical etc.)?
    4. How long after the tenancy ended do I have to take the matter to court?
    Thank you in anticipation of your reply.
    ubt
    Did you not take a deposit (and protect it in a scheme)? Why can't you claim the cost of repairs from that?
    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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      #3
      Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
      Did you not take a deposit (and protect it in a scheme)? Why can't you claim the cost of repairs from that?
      The deposit was £1200 and the damage was £4900

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        #4
        Assuming you have a detailed check-in inventory and evidence of the damage when T vacated, you should be able to claim the full amount of the deposit from the protection scheme and the rest you will have to sue T for through the court.

        Was the deposit protected and is the inventory (i)detailed and (2) signed by the tenant at the start of the tenancy?
        'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
          Assuming you have a detailed check-in inventory and evidence of the damage when T vacated, you should be able to claim the full amount of the deposit from the protection scheme and the rest you will have to sue T for through the court.

          Was the deposit protected and is the inventory (i)detailed and (2) signed by the tenant at the start of the tenancy?
          Yes the deposit was protected, the inventory detailed, signed at start and everything in order etc etc. My problem is advise on my original four questions.

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            #6
            I think you should write to the guarantor, explain that they could be liable for these costs, and ask for the tenants current address.

            What paperwork do you have for the guarantee? Was it executed as a deed and witnessed?


            You don't have to have the work done, you are claiming for the loss of value to your property. The judge will make a decision on the value of the loss, based on whatever evidence you can provide as to its value. By way of example, here is how I would calculate the 'deposit value' of a carpet...
            1. Cost new (£500)
            2. Expected Lifespan (5 years)
            3. Age at end of tenancy (3 years)
            Divide 1 by 2 to get a value per year for the carpet - £100 in this case. Then work out the life that has been lost by taking 3 from 2 - 2 years in this case. Therefore, the deposit value is the remaining life (2 years) multiplied by the yearly value (£100) - £200.

            A quality carpet where the figures are £1200, 15 years, 3 years would produce a much higher figure of £960.

            I believe you have 6 years to claim, but if you leave it a long time you are going to need better proof as to the condition of the property when the tenants left.

            Comment


              #7
              Thank you Snorkerz for your expert reply to all my questions. It's obvious why you are a senior member. Thanks again.

              Comment

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