Tenant damaged brand new cooker after only 5 days into the tenancy!!

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    Tenant damaged brand new cooker after only 5 days into the tenancy!!

    Hi, I am a newbie LL. I just went to my flat 5 days after new tenant moved in and the new tenant pointed out that he has burnt 2 knobs of the cooker! I could not believe it since the cooker is not even 2 months old!
    It is a cheap £200 gas cooker (Beko SG562W) and basically there is a guard that you attach to the grill door to protect the knobs from the heat when using the grill. The tenant said he used this but pulled the guard off to take the food out and the knobs started melting straight away.
    I think this may be a slight lie but at least he was honest enough to put out the damage to me.
    I said I will ring the manufacturers since under guarantee but don’t think this will be covered so should I charge him for damage and if so do it at the end of the tenancy and take it out of his deposit or what? Please advise

    #2
    Yes. This damage is not caused by fair wear and tear; T has not used your premises' equipment in a properly tenantlike way. T must pay for cooker to be replaced (if necessary) or fixed- now, not just at end of tenancy, as T will need to cook/eat before then!
    JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
    1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
    2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
    3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
    4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

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      #3
      Any repairs to the cooker are the tenants responsibility. If it is ultimately returned to you in a 'broken' condition then you can claim the repair costs or a proportion of it's replacement value.

      Comment


        #4
        Its my experience that these type of replacement parts are readily available as spares, they can be ordered from the web, dont cost the earth and are very easy to fit.

        Comment


          #5
          I would reserve the right to charge the tenant.

          He may end up being a very good tenant, and this cost is minor in the grand scale of things.

          Keep an eye on the property, and if these sort of mishaps are regular, charge him, and get rid of him asap.
          Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

          Comment


            #6
            All the replies so far assume that the "cheap cooker" appliance is okay and working properly. How do you know it is working as it should?

            Have you chekced it or had it tested to ensure that it is not overheating and does not present a danger to the T? Just because it is new does not necessarily mean that it is not malfunctioning? Is it the correct cooker, with the correct jets fitted to it, for the type of gas supplied to the property?

            If the temperature was hot enough to melt handles what temperature did the outer surfaces or parts of the cooker reach, and could this present a potential hazard to occupants?

            It may not necessarily be the fault of the T.

            pm
            Before acting on forum advice, you may wish to consult an expert, someone who has all the relevant facts, and who accepts liability for their advice.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by property mongrel View Post
              How do you know it is working as it should?

              Have you chekced it or had it tested to ensure that it is not overheating and does not present a danger to the T?
              It may not necessarily be the fault of the T.
              I have one of those similar cookers, and if you keep the the guard on, everything is fine. I have not removed the guard until things cool down, and have not melted any knobs. A sticky label on the cooker or cupboard next to cooker stating to use the guard should be in plain view

              The manufacturers and suppliers check that correct jets are fitted to it for U.K. use, therefore it is supplied safe and ready to use by the manyfacturer and the retail seller. It is not up to a purchaser to check a brand new cooker, or to get someone to check a brand new cooker, as it's already done. But things DO go wrong with new items, so just check that when on gas mark 5, that after 3 / 6 minutes, the thermostat is working, and you can see / hear the gas reduce in pressure from first started from cold ( look though window, if it has one )

              Suggest d4rmsc order a new guard as well as knobs, as you can be sure that one day after the 6th tenant, there will be no guard in sight. Photocopy the manual showing how to fit the guard, as well, to personaly give to every new tenant.

              Comment


                #8
                I think the tenant is decent but it is still early days.
                I will try to order replacement knobs and guard as suggested and maybe decide to charge him at the end of the tenancy if the parts cost more than £20. Otherwise will not since like I said he seems nice.
                See how things pan out
                Thanks all for your input

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by d4rmsc View Post
                  I think the tenant is decent but it is still early days.
                  I will try to order replacement knobs and guard as suggested and maybe decide to charge him at the end of the tenancy if the parts cost more than £20. Otherwise will not since like I said he seems nice.
                  See how things pan out
                  Yes, make him take the pan out.
                  JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                  1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                  2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                  3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                  4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Personally i think this sounds like a faff. You have to put a guard on to use the grill? I wouldn't put this type of appliance into a rented flat as i think this knob burning fiasco will become a regular occurance. Would it be possible to speak to the retailer, explain what happened and see if you can get them to switch it for a different cooker?

                    If not i'd be tempted to cover the cost the first time for this tenant and then subsequently state to every future tenant that the replacment of melted knobs will be the responsibilty if the tenant. If you don't make them pay then they will have no incentive to take care with the guard.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I agree it sounds like poor design. You should be able to use a cooker without putting a 'knob guard on' (if you'll pardon the expression!).
                      'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                        I agree it sounds like poor design. You should be able to use a cooker without putting a 'knob guard on' (if you'll pardon the expression!).
                        We excuse your expresion, as you are well able to spot those who need guarding, and we also see that you "take no prisoners" on here.

                        To be honest, you don't know a cooker needs a guard until you unpack it, ( it looks so cute and shiny in the showroom ) and look through the instructions to see where this black ledge goes, and you dont want to push it in too hard where they say, incase you damage something, so often it does not get fitted by tenants, for fear of damage, so they don't, and the knobs melt.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by ram View Post
                          We excuse your expresion, as you are well able to spot those who need guarding, and we also see that you "take no prisoners" on here.
                          Nicely put!

                          I appreciate what you're saying about the knob guard. But the old cliche springs to mind - if they can put a man on the moon, why can't they design a cooker which doesn't need a fiddly attachment to be put on and off to stop its own knobs getting burnt?

                          My parents used to have a caravan with a lift-up/fold down glass top over the cooker hob. You had to wait at least 30 mins after using the hob before putting the glass lid down (to create more workspace), otherwise it shattered, silently, into about a million bits. It shattered quite often. I think they got through about six before deciding the stress of picking the bits out of their hair and the expense of replacing it was too much and they did without it after that. Poor design? I think so!
                          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                            Poor design? I think so!
                            Yes, but design is influenced on customer needs, and not on what is good design sometimes.

                            Remember when there was a fight with car design to have the most cup holders than anyone else.

                            Customers want glass on their cookers, customers ( may ) want the grill under the hob, so as not to have a void above the cooker you get with an eye level grill, so as to deprive them of an extra wall cupboard to put the junk mail in.

                            Customers want laminate flooring, then landlord complains "they scratched it" and I did not know chairs would be moved across it twice a day at meal times, oh dear, how inconsiderate of the tenants not having the strength to lift every chair, and having to contort themselves to lift the chair, while sat on it to move it backwards, lift it and place it down without the minutest of movement to avoid scratching the floor ( does not happen with carpet ! )

                            Customers ( landlords ) want to pay the cheapest price for white goods for tenants, so the chepest is bought, with resulting knob melting of cooker controls. or smallest drum size in a washing machine.

                            The O.P , like me, was not aware of the need of a guard, untill it is unpacked, and only then do you see it has a guard to stop the knobs melting, but then it's too late.

                            Gripe finished. ( Gripe not intended at you or O.P. )

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Interesting. Jeffrey once offered us the view that when you are paying for someone's services (e.g a lawyer, accountant, dentist, plumber or whatever), you can only realistically have any two out of these three : quality, speed and low cost (ie.you can't expect all three). I agree with him on this.

                              It seems that where design is concerned, a similar principle operates : you can generally only have two out of : good design (which is the perfect blend of form and function) low cost and good aftersales service.
                              'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                              Comment

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