Signing of Inventory in Joint AST

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Signing of Inventory in Joint AST

    Mental block. Please would someone reassure me that it is OK for just one of the tenants in a joint tenancy to agree and sign the inventory? There are six of them (tenants, I mean), but they are moving in over the summer in dribs and drabs and I want it sorted this week. There are two there at the moment. Is two better than one, or doesn't it make any difference?

    Thanks people.
    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

    #2
    Presuming they all have joint and several liability (and Jeffrey says only 4 can) then even if only 1 signs and is held responsible, then they are all liable for his debt anyway.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Snorkerz View Post
      Presuming they all have joint and several liability (and Jeffrey says only 4 can) then even if only 1 signs and is held responsible, then they are all liable for his debt anyway.
      Thanks!

      As for the old 'only four can have a joint tenancy' chestnut...after at least a year of trying to pin Jeffrey down as to what difference this obscure mediaeval tenet makes in practice to me in the the 21st century, I am reassured by Lawcruncher that for my purposes as a student LL it makes no difference in terms of their liability for rent or other financial liabilities. I refuse to lose sleep over it!

      I think if they all wanted to go on Crusades to the Holy Land or something, it might change things. But they don't. They are all too busy watching the football.
      'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
        As for the old 'only four can have a joint tenancy' chestnut...after at least a year of trying to pin Jeffrey down as to what difference this obscure mediaeval tenet makes in practice to me in the the 21st century, I am reassured by Lawcruncher that for my purposes as a student LL it makes no difference in terms of their liability for rent or other financial liabilities.
        ...until the day when you (as L) are suing T5 (after T1-4 have vanished or died) and you claim that he is liable jointly and severally for the whole debt. He retorts, "I've read s.34(2)(a) of the Trustee Act 1925. Jeffrey says that I'm not even T". Judge rules in his favour and awards costs against you.
        JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
        1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
        2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
        3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
        4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
          ...until the day when you (as L) are suing T5 (after T1-4 have vanished or died) and you claim that he is liable jointly and severally for the whole debt. He retorts, "I've read s.34(2)(a) of the Trustee Act 1925. Jeffrey says that I'm not even T". Judge rules in his favour and awards costs against you.
          The chance of T1-4 (when they are all young, healthy UK undergraduates) vanishing or dying is remote and although a theoretical risk, it does not keep me awake at night. (There are other things which worry me more, like whether the Tories will be in power for ever, or whether North Korea will start a nuclear war). Our tenants all have home-owning guarantors and in the chances of all eight (Gs and Ts) being wiped out simultaneously are almost infinitesimally small.

          Plus, since I was sadly never able to get a straight answer out of you to the question I posed several times : 'What practical difference does it make in my situation, please?', I came to the conclusion that the answer was probably 'not much'. I am reassured that the answer is still 'not much'.

          It is my understanding from this forum that permitted occupiers are in any case still liable for rent, as Lawcruncher says.
          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
            It is my understanding from this forum that permitted occupiers are in any case still liable for rent, as Lawcruncher says.
            Yes, that's your understanding (albeit maybe incorrect).
            JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
            1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
            2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
            3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
            4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
              Yes, that's your understanding (albeit maybe incorrect).
              So are you saying that permitted occupiers are not liable for rent?
              'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

              Comment


                #8
                I'm doubtful that L can prove their liability; how did they become liable and by what means can L evidence their accepting liability?
                JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

                Comment

                Latest Activity

                Collapse

                Working...
                X