Changing electrical sockets

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    Changing electrical sockets

    Hi,

    We have sockets in our rental property that don't have the individual on/off switches on them and our tenant has asked us to change them to the one with switches on. There is nothing physically wrong with the sockets and I was wondering if anybody knows if you must have the newer style with the switches or can I stick with the old sockets?

    Thanks for your help.

    Dribblin

    #2
    Originally posted by Dribblin View Post
    Hi,

    We have sockets in our rental property that don't have the individual on/off switches on them and our tenant has asked us to change them to the one with switches on. There is nothing physically wrong with the sockets and I was wondering if anybody knows if you must have the newer style with the switches or can I stick with the old sockets?

    Thanks for your help.

    Dribblin
    You don't "need" to change them if they are safe, but they cost about £1.50 each for new ones.
    Just get them changed, any competent DIY'er can do them.
    Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

    Comment


      #3
      I think they are standard in a new build/renovation, I seem to remember doubles with switches were compulsory when we renovated a licensed HMO last year. Thesaint is right, dead easy to fit yourself, but in a rental I'd be inclined to get the pro's in so if they plug two 4 plug extensions in, with computers, hair-dryers and straighteners working off them and it goes bang then they can't blame you

      Comment


        #4
        There's no obligation to fit ones with switches if the current ones are safe. But are you sure they are? How long is it since the property had an electrical check-up? Is there an up-to-date consumer unit?

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by thesaint View Post
          You don't "need" to change them if they are safe, but they cost about £1.50 each for new ones.
          Just get them changed, any competent DIY'er can do them.
          Sadly no longer I agree that any competen DIY'er is capable of changing them but this is no longer allowed. If you are not registered as a 'competant person' on the government register of pointless red tape you must have the work by someone who is or do the work and have it checked by someone who is.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by fletchj View Post
            Sadly no longer I agree that any competen DIY'er is capable of changing them but this is no longer allowed. If you are not registered as a 'competant person' on the government register of pointless red tape you must have the work by someone who is or do the work and have it checked by someone who is.
            Have you got a link?
            Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

            Comment


              #7
              I suppose one should ask why the tenant wants this done? Is he too lazy to unplug items not in use or if children are present is he worried that a child may stick something in the socket?

              Agree about NOT a DIY thing.

              I once had a tenant demand a new consumer unit because he had never seen an old style fuse box before - but in was only put in 1980 ish and quite sound. Still got tenant and fuse box.



              Freedom at the point of zero............

              Comment


                #8
                If you have an electrical safety certificate then it will become void is you change the sockets. If then there is a subsequent electric shock accident then you personally can be held liable. Regards Peter

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by thesaint View Post
                  Have you got a link?
                  He won't, because it's not true. There's absolutely nothing regulations-wise to prevent a d-i-yer from replacing a like-for-like socket. Installing a whole new circuit, for example, would be a different matter.

                  One particular instance, though, where it would definitely not be a good idea to mess with these sockets (which sound as if they may be pretty old) would be if the wiring itself is very old, eg sheathed with lead or rubber (ie not PVC). Rubber insulation will be very likely to crumble away if disturbed at all, and become even more dangerous than it already is (and anyone would be nuts to let out a house with wiring in that sort of condition in the first place).

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Ericthelobster View Post
                    He won't, because it's not true. There's absolutely nothing regulations-wise to prevent a d-i-yer from replacing a like-for-like socket.
                    Yeah but - no but. Eric is not correct if you are doing it in the kitchen or in the garden.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Telometer View Post
                      Yeah but - no but. Eric is not correct if you are doing it in the kitchen or in the garden.
                      It would be easier if you provided a link.
                      Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

                      Comment


                        #12
                        http://www.diydoctor.org.uk/projects/partp.htm

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by fletchj View Post
                          Sadly no longer I agree that any competen DIY'er is capable of changing them but this is no longer allowed. If you are not registered as a 'competant person' on the government register of pointless red tape you must have the work by someone who is or do the work and have it checked by someone who is.


                          The Government intends, within the next few months it seems, to introduce legislation in the form of an additional section (Part P) to the Building Regulations which will state that any electrical installations must be carried out by a competent person. This is in line with the competency expected from gas installers and goes far beyond just knowing which colour wires do what.
                          I agree, it's not true. and the link is basically just advertising. I had to bring a place up to 17th edition last month and the leccy had no objections at all to me doing it myself, then re-inspecting and passing the work. It is true that I paid for the inspection twice but I still came out in front by about 700 quid (less a tenner for backache creams)
                          I offer no guarantee that anything I say is correct. wysiwyg

                          Comment


                            #14
                            So, if I move a socket in a Kitchen, it is covered by part P.

                            Can I do it myself and then have the whole property checked for electrical safety?

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Thanks, that just shows "Installation".
                              They use the word "replacing" when describing what would need to happen in the case in question.
                              Allow tenants to protect their own deposits. I want free money when they do it wrong

                              Comment

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