Noisy neighbour disturbing AST tenant; how to respond?

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    Noisy neighbour disturbing AST tenant; how to respond?

    We signed a Assured Shorthold Tenancy Agreement for 12 months. We have just finished 6 months. We have a huge problem we live next to a woman with 6 kids (council have placed her in the new build). The noise and the banging never stops through the thin walls and they continually throw things into our garden (metal rod, to metal garden chair and rubbish). I car has been scratched by one of her sons. It has got to the point that we cannot take it anymore. I have complained to the Agency and they have complained to the Landlord. The Landlord then tried to complain to the council but i was sent an e mail to say it would be better i do it as i live in the property. We have since heard that the previous tenants also complained and finally moved out (agency deny this). I am not sure who the previous agency was who let the house but our agency said that know nothing of any complaints. Our landlord has now said that he will release us from our contract if we pay the agency charges about £300 and we cannot go until he has new tenants. I am not happy as there seems to be nothing to protect us the tenants and the agency does not care about our situation. I actually said to her stop sticking up for the landlord what about us. Please any suggestions on what we can do. We dont just want to leave as this will affect our reference if we need to hire another house. Is there any legal protection for me to get out of my lease. This problem with my neighbour has been going on for a year before we arrived. I have contact my local council but nothing has happened.

    #2
    you need to contact the local authority yourself and get on to the environmental officer who will help you with the noise and rubbish problem. you should be able to do this online on your local authority website if not visit the local link office and they will help you.

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      #3
      I agree with the above advice; also, be aware that the letting agent works for the LL, not for you. There is no reason at all why the agent should be on 'your' side in this. His job is simply to manage the tenancy and maintain the property on behalf of the LL. It is not his, or the LL's fault that there is an anti-social family next door to you. You would be in the same position as if you were an owner occupier, really.

      Obviously, in the long term it will not be in the LL's interests to have this family living as they do, where they do. He will find it hard to re-let the property. At least you can move out in another six months, or sooner if it can be re-let and you are willing to pay the £300.

      In your place I would agree to the latter if new tenants can be found within the next three months. Ask the LA to advertise the property and make it clear that you are willing for them to conduct viewings. Otherwise stay put until the end of the fixed term then go.

      In the meantime, keep an accurate written log of all disturbance, anti-social behaviour, rubbish thrown into your agrden, etc. The guy form the council will need this if action against them is to be taken. Can you enlist the support of the people living on the other side of this family's house?
      'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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        #4
        Thank you for you replies. It's so sad that nothing protects the tenants. I think we should have been told about the problem with the neighbour then we would not have moved in. The whole complex knows about her, a elderly gentleman who live on the otherside of the complex said to me the other day so you are the lady who lives next to the neighbour from hell. That is not funny and i personally think our landlord should be willing to let us go. There is just nothing that protects the tenant. I believe we should have been told (same when you buy a house) but now we are stuck with the problem. So when do i rent my new house from which month? Why should we pay £300 and then also be put out if he cannot find a tenant. I love this house but i just cannot live like this. I think the landlord should take all into consideration not just his pocket.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by loreng View Post
          Thank you for you replies. It's so sad that nothing protects the tenants.] I think we should have been told about the problem with the neighbour then we would not have moved in. The whole complex knows about her, a elderly gentleman who live on the otherside of the complex said to me the other day so you are the lady who lives next to the neighbour from hell. That is not funny and i personally think our landlord should be willing to let us go. There is just nothing that protects the tenant. I believe we should have been told (same when you buy a house) but now we are stuck with the problem. So when do i rent my new house from which month? Why should we pay £300 and then also be put out if he cannot find a tenant. I love this house but i just cannot live like this. I think the landlord should take all into consideration not just his pocket.
          Your frustration is understandable, but unfocused.

          There is plenty of legislation in place to protect tenants in a number of ways (e.g. security of tenure, protection form eviction, etc), but it would be unrealistic and unenforceable for Ts to be able to move out just because they do not like their neighbours' lifestyles, children, noise-levels, etc.

          I repeat : it is not your LL's fault that this family have moved in.

          If you can prove that you asked the agent/LL on viewing whether there were any neighbours about whom complaints had been made to the council, and he said 'No' when in fact he knew there were, then you may have a case for claiming you entered into a contract having had the property misrepresented to you. If you cannot prove this, then you must do as advised and contact the council, keep a log, etc. That is the only way the family can be evicted/warned to quieten down and control their children.

          You have my sympathy, but just moaning about it will get you nowhere, I'm afraid. Of course the LL will want to keep his bank account in the black - he probably has a mortgage to pay. If your complaint hinged on something for which he has a statutory responsibility (e.g. the heating, or the electricity supply), then he could act. But unless the family are his tenants too (which they don't seem to be), what do you expect him to do?
          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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            #6
            I am focused on getting out of this place sooner rather than later with or without the LL help. Putting council people into newly built houses is a disaster. They are unmannered people. Never in my life have i ever seen anything like it animals live better than these people do. I expect my LL to complain to the council seeing we are not his first tenant to complain and i would expect him to continue to complain as it's for his longterm benefit not mine. We will move on and the problem will continue for the next tenants (not if i can help it). It will work both ways in my case. Just for the record this family havent just moved in they have lived here for more than a year - police called time and time again one incident to stop her children from jumping out the window and from stopping the children from breaking into his house when it was empty and from stopping the children peeing his his garden. Great and my LL chose not to mention anything. Yes how convenient for him and his bank account.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by loreng View Post
              I am focused on getting out of this place sooner rather than later with or without the LL help. Putting council people into newly built houses is a disaster. They are unmannered people. Never in my life have i ever seen anything like it animals live better than these people do. I expect my LL to complain to the council seeing we are not his first tenant to complain and i would expect him to continue to complain as it's for his longterm benefit not mine. We will move on and the problem will continue for the next tenants (not if i can help it). It will work both ways in my case. Just for the record this family havent just moved in they have lived here for more than a year - police called time and time again one incident to stop her children from jumping out the window and from stopping the children from breaking into his house when it was empty and from stopping the children peeing his his garden. Great and my LL chose not to mention anything. Yes how convenient for him and his bank account.
              If your LL does not live in the same street, it is unlikely that he would know that any complaints had been made about the family. Even if previous tenants had complained to him or informed him that they had complained to the council, he was under no obligation to reveal this to prosepctive new Ts (like you) unless he was asked directly.

              Nor is he in a position to complain on your behalf. He is not the one being inconvenienced by the family - you are. Only you can provide the evidence which will allow the council to act. Has anyone kept a record of the incidents when the police attended?
              'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

              Comment


                #8
                "Putting council people into newly built houses is a disaster"
                I grew up on a council estate but am now a LL - please don't tar us all with your neighbour's brush! On council estates there will be a mix of those who don't care at all and live like pigs and those who take a real pride in their homes and gardens and are considerate to others. Just like a private estate - you never know which type will rent or buy the house next to you. Google "Neighbours from Hell in Britain" and read some horror stories of people who own houses and neighbours from hell have bought the house next to them. You do have one big advantage - you have rented and not bought this property!
                Unshackled by the chains of idle vanity, A modest manatee, that's me

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by loreng View Post
                  I am focused on getting out of this place sooner rather than later with or without the LL help. Putting council people into newly built houses is a disaster. They are unmannered people. Never in my life have i ever seen anything like it animals live better than these people do. I expect my LL to complain to the council seeing we are not his first tenant to complain and i would expect him to continue to complain as it's for his longterm benefit not mine. We will move on and the problem will continue for the next tenants (not if i can help it). It will work both ways in my case. Just for the record this family havent just moved in they have lived here for more than a year - police called time and time again one incident to stop her children from jumping out the window and from stopping the children from breaking into his house when it was empty and from stopping the children peeing his his garden. Great and my LL chose not to mention anything. Yes how convenient for him and his bank account.
                  If you owned the house would you complain to the mortgage lender about your neighbours? and what do you think they would do if you did?

                  Dealing with troublesome neighbours is entirely the responsibility of the Council and the Police and it is your responsibilty to manage that process. You chose to rent this house and just as if you had bought you could had checked before making the decision to rent. Renting does not afford you any greater civil rights than a owner, the responsibility to deal with these situation sits on your shoulders

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Also, I would suggest it's the responsibility of the T to research their prospective neighbours, not the LL.

                    I'm a LL, and rent out the house I used to live in. I wasn't a big fan of my neighbours, sometimes they annoyed me, othertimes they were OK. I didn't mention my personal preferences to my T because, frankly, it's none of my business and she doesn't seem to share my tastes - at least she seems to like the neighbours.

                    I'm also a T, and one of the things I did before letting this house was to visit the area a couple of times, including in the evening, to check it was quiet. I also looked at the state of the neighbouring properties before moving in.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by loreng View Post
                      Thank you for you replies. It's so sad that nothing protects the tenants.
                      Originally posted by loreng View Post
                      There is just nothing that protects the tenant.
                      OMG! You cannot be serious!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        My mate had a similar problem, he was lucky though.. When he went to complain he was told they were being relocated but it would not happen if any more complaints were lodged against them...

                        He left it and they moved out..

                        The lesson to learn from this is that its always a good idea to scope an area out before you move in, having a dog to walk around with helps.. that way you don't look like some wierd stalker..

                        My point is..

                        When you move borrow a dog and spend a good few evenings walking around the new area, check it out and make sure its a pleasant little place, it won't guarantee you a trouble free lifestyle when you move but it should give you a good idea what to expect...!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by qbert888 View Post
                          When you move borrow a dog and spend a good few evenings walking around the new area, check it out and make sure its a pleasant little place, it won't guarantee you a trouble free lifestyle when you move but it should give you a good idea what to expect...!
                          I think perhaps you mean 'Before you move'.
                          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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                            #14
                            yeah, i do, which, but by the sounds of things thats the plan here!

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