Condensation in a property

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  • slicecbr
    replied
    Originally posted by Telometer View Post
    You have created the problem as tenant. It is a problem that has possibly previously been created by previous tenants. I have lived in places that have been "damp". By the time I have left, they have no longer been damp.
    Maybe the quality of the building isn't up to scratch.

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  • jghomer
    replied
    Originally posted by slicecbr View Post
    we living in the 1940s?
    But fact is a massive portion of UK rental stock was built pre 1940's, and without a sensible approach by both LL and T towards management of airborne moisture, condensation will not go away :-(

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  • slicecbr
    replied
    Originally posted by Telometer View Post
    Wow! 99%. But only 40% in the private sector. That must mean that over 100% of public sector homes are non-decent.
    Privately rented has the highest 'non decent homes', by tenure, compared with owner-occupied, local authority and housing assocation.

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  • Telometer
    replied
    Originally posted by slicecbr View Post
    There are statistics out there that state that 99% of private dwellings in Wales (lower in England, but due to standards being lower) falls below decent home standards. Also, the privately rented sector (by tenure) has the highest percentage of 'non decent homes' (2005) with 40%.
    Wow! 99%. But only 40% in the private sector. That must mean that over 100% of public sector homes are non-decent.

    Originally posted by Jackman88 View Post
    The property is an old building and i believe that it is a problem that the has reoccured rather then a problem that i have created as a tenant.
    You have created the problem as tenant. It is a problem that has possibly previously been created by previous tenants. I have lived in places that have been "damp". By the time I have left, they have no longer been damp.

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  • slicecbr
    replied
    Originally posted by Jackman88 View Post
    I agree that as a tenant I have acted in a proper manner and have tried to ensure the property is fully ventilated as much as possible. However it is essential that i cook and clean etc so condensation in that sense is unavoidable. The property is an old building and i believe that it is a problem that the has reoccured rather then a problem that i have created as a tenant.
    I have been in the similar situation as yourself and it annoys me when the blame falls on the tenant (sometimes rightfully so), when in a matter of fact, the building could be inadequate and more prone to condensation, and the L and LA would insist the T is the problem when it is the building itself.

    There are statistics out there that state that 99% of private dwellings in Wales (lower in England, but due to standards being lower) falls below decent home standards. Also, the privately rented sector (by tenure) has the highest percentage of 'non decent homes' (2005) with 40%.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jackman88
    replied
    I agree that as a tenant I have acted in a proper manner and have tried to ensure the property is fully ventilated as much as possible. However it is essential that i cook and clean etc so condensation in that sense is unavoidable. The property is an old building and i believe that it is a problem that the has reoccured rather then a problem that i have created as a tenant.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mars Mug
    replied
    It is quite possible that a house/flat could be poorly designed. I once lived in a ground floor flat with a single skin wall bathroom appended at the back. Opening the window was a security risk and no other form of ventilation helped to stop the mouldy ‘map of South America’ from appearing on the wall, until the wallpaper fell in a heap onto the floor.

    Sometimes there are limits to what a tenant can practically do, even behaving in a ‘tenant like manner’, and sometimes the landlord needs to consider alternative long term solutions for the benefit of their own property.

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  • slicecbr
    replied
    Originally posted by Telometer View Post
    It's up to the tenant to live in a tenantly manner. And that includes ensuring sufficient ventilation and heating.
    I agree totally, but its not always the tenants fault, if you ever bought a house to live in with your family and was told you couldn't do this, had to do this, etc. you wouldn't move there.

    When you rent you don't get the in's and out's and often pushed to take it asap, and then find out a wall has no cavity and more prone to condensation and mould.

    New builds have more regs. and higher code aspirations, and older properties to today standards are inadequate, so its not always the tenants fault.

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  • Telometer
    replied
    It's up to the tenant to live in a tenantly manner. And that includes ensuring sufficient ventilation and heating.

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  • slicecbr
    replied
    Originally posted by Telometer View Post
    Condensation is almost certainly the fault of the tenant. Without a tenant, there would be no condensation.

    Open some windows and turn the central heating up. Do not dry clothes in the flat - instead use a vented/condensing tumble drier. Do not boil pans of water without lids on them. Do not shower without the bathroom window open and leave it thus until the bathroom is dry. Sleep with the window open a crack.
    Doesn't this seem totally un-reasonable for the tenant?! "Without a tenant, there would be no condensation", well if thats the case why rent the property out, if its in no fit state!? All buildings should be able to overcome the issues presented by a tenant, extra heat etc., we living in the 1940s?

    I have had problems with mould / condensation, the walls don't have a cavity, how are you suppose to live? Don't breath in-doors?! WTF

    Next time I BUY a house I will follow your recommendations...NOT... do you live like that in your house/flat?

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  • jeffrey
    replied
    Nah, they're in the forest- and what do bears do in a forest?

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  • jghomer
    replied
    Goldilocks alone I think wouldn't cause such a problem. But if the 3 bears are there too..?

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  • Telometer
    replied
    I am not sure that it completely our fault, surely after a month we could not be the cause of this amount of condensation.
    So who else has been having showers, boiling pasta, breathing and drying clothes in your flat? Goldilocks?

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  • jghomer
    replied
    If I was your landlord, and you were a good paying tenant, I would perhaps offer you a dehumidifer yes, if it meant you weren't going to leave!

    You keep mentioning only 'condensation', but I presume your main problem is the MOULD growth that has occured DUE to condensation?

    Double glazing with trickle vents would help. As may cavity wall insulation and extractors.

    This is not your LL's fault, but if he is a bit more pro-active with a solution he will avoid having to repaint the property between tenants every time! Trust me i've been here!

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  • Jackman88
    replied
    Thank you for the response!

    I am not sure that it completely our fault, surely after a month we could not be the cause of this amount of condensation. As in the rooms that have been mainly affected by the condensation, there have been new paint jobs which could possible because of a problem before we moved in. There hasnt been anything that we have done (to my knowledge) to make it into this state.

    We have ventilated the rooms as much as possible during the day. We have also been told to leave our heating on at all times specially during the night which we have done. However there is no kitchen door which means that when cook or clean using the washer machine this will moisten the air right?

    I am not sure what we would like the landlord/letting agent to do. I doubt very much he will install double glazing. But I think that it is not unreasonable for a humidifier to be installed and a professional cleaning job to be done on the property is it?

    We also reported the condensation to our letting agent in early December which was when it was becomming rather bad, it has taken till now to address the situation.

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