Condensation in a property

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    #16
    I agree that as a tenant I have acted in a proper manner and have tried to ensure the property is fully ventilated as much as possible. However it is essential that i cook and clean etc so condensation in that sense is unavoidable. The property is an old building and i believe that it is a problem that the has reoccured rather then a problem that i have created as a tenant.

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      #17
      Originally posted by Jackman88 View Post
      I agree that as a tenant I have acted in a proper manner and have tried to ensure the property is fully ventilated as much as possible. However it is essential that i cook and clean etc so condensation in that sense is unavoidable. The property is an old building and i believe that it is a problem that the has reoccured rather then a problem that i have created as a tenant.
      I have been in the similar situation as yourself and it annoys me when the blame falls on the tenant (sometimes rightfully so), when in a matter of fact, the building could be inadequate and more prone to condensation, and the L and LA would insist the T is the problem when it is the building itself.

      There are statistics out there that state that 99% of private dwellings in Wales (lower in England, but due to standards being lower) falls below decent home standards. Also, the privately rented sector (by tenure) has the highest percentage of 'non decent homes' (2005) with 40%.

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        #18
        Originally posted by slicecbr View Post
        There are statistics out there that state that 99% of private dwellings in Wales (lower in England, but due to standards being lower) falls below decent home standards. Also, the privately rented sector (by tenure) has the highest percentage of 'non decent homes' (2005) with 40%.
        Wow! 99%. But only 40% in the private sector. That must mean that over 100% of public sector homes are non-decent.

        Originally posted by Jackman88 View Post
        The property is an old building and i believe that it is a problem that the has reoccured rather then a problem that i have created as a tenant.
        You have created the problem as tenant. It is a problem that has possibly previously been created by previous tenants. I have lived in places that have been "damp". By the time I have left, they have no longer been damp.

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          #19
          Originally posted by Telometer View Post
          Wow! 99%. But only 40% in the private sector. That must mean that over 100% of public sector homes are non-decent.
          Privately rented has the highest 'non decent homes', by tenure, compared with owner-occupied, local authority and housing assocation.

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            #20
            Originally posted by slicecbr View Post
            we living in the 1940s?
            But fact is a massive portion of UK rental stock was built pre 1940's, and without a sensible approach by both LL and T towards management of airborne moisture, condensation will not go away :-(

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              #21
              Originally posted by Telometer View Post
              You have created the problem as tenant. It is a problem that has possibly previously been created by previous tenants. I have lived in places that have been "damp". By the time I have left, they have no longer been damp.
              Maybe the quality of the building isn't up to scratch.

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