Reasonable requests

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  • Reasonable requests

    I have a friend who has just moved into a flat that is 2 yrs old. There are no curtain rails to the windows, and no nails in the walls for pictures. If they put up pictures, when they vacate can the agent deduct money for putting back to wall? Also can the agent request you remove the curtain rails, after all curtains are necessary and landlord should supply, and also pictures are part of living.
    I am here because I am inexperienced and want to learn.

  • #2
    Originally posted by boredbird View Post
    I have a friend who has just moved into a flat that is 2 yrs old. There are no curtain rails to the windows, and no nails in the walls for pictures. If they put up pictures, when they vacate can the agent deduct money for putting back to wall? Also can the agent request you remove the curtain rails, after all curtains are necessary and landlord should supply, and also pictures are part of living.
    Yes, the landlord could be entitled to deduct the cost of making good the walls at the end of the tenancy.

    The landlord has no legal obligation to supply curtains, or to allow the tenant to bang nails in the wall to hang pictures.

    Many/most landlords are reasonable people, however, so the best thing to do would be for your friend to ask the LL whether he is either willing to install curtains, or willing to allow curtains rails to be installed, etc. Whatever is agreed, it is essential to get something in writing from the landlord confirming the agreement, even if it's just an email.

    Note that the agent merely acts on behalf of the landlord. The tenant has no contract with the agent.

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    • #3
      Westminster- you say make good the walls after the tenancy. What do you (and others) feel constitutes an appropriate repair? Polyfiller and a quick paint touch up, or does a wall need fully repainting? How about when a room is wallpapered?

      I only ask because I have just supervised a replacement double glazing unit being fitted (at tenants request - he didn't wish to be around for the fitting and asked that I be there), and I noticed he has a large number of pictures on the walls, either hung with nails or screwed in place. In a couple of places he has obviously hung a picture then changed his mind about where to put it, leaving big holes around it. The room was redecorated less than 15 months ago. He has lived there for a month, inventory completed and signed to say walls are pretty much perfect apart from a couple of light scuffs. Contract states pictures hooks to be used and only with LL permission.

      I don't want to cause a fuss and I would have allowed a couple of picture hooks if asked, but I also don't want lots of unsightly holes or badly repaired patchy bits left for the next tenants. I feel it is only fair to point this out to him so he has chance to make good the damage properly, and avoid deductions from his deposit.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by remyrobson View Post
        Westminster- you say make good the walls after the tenancy. What do you (and others) feel constitutes an appropriate repair? Polyfiller and a quick paint touch up, or does a wall need fully repainting? How about when a room is wallpapered?

        I only ask because I have just supervised a replacement double glazing unit being fitted (at tenants request - he didn't wish to be around for the fitting and asked that I be there), and I noticed he has a large number of pictures on the walls, either hung with nails or screwed in place. In a couple of places he has obviously hung a picture then changed his mind about where to put it, leaving big holes around it. The room was redecorated less than 15 months ago. He has lived there for a month, inventory completed and signed to say walls are pretty much perfect apart from a couple of light scuffs. Contract states pictures hooks to be used and only with LL permission.

        I don't want to cause a fuss and I would have allowed a couple of picture hooks if asked, but I also don't want lots of unsightly holes or badly repaired patchy bits left for the next tenants. I feel it is only fair to point this out to him so he has chance to make good the damage properly, and avoid deductions from his deposit.
        If you are happy to let them live with it until the end of their tenancy I would suggest getting them to request retrospective permission in writing, which you can agree to and set out your conditional standard of repair which should include the immediate repair of damage from the hooks not in use.

        I used to rent out shabbier house shares with wonky old walls and dodgy wallpaper and and consequently only required a the most basic repair. My current properties are newly converted with excellent flat plasterwork. Poor repair work would be extremely noticeable.

        I expect the filling to be excellent - properly filled and sanded flush - it is so very easy to do. I would expect them to use the correct shade of paint and touch up tidily but not worry about it if the repair still stood out simply because the original paint had faded etc.. That will be easy enough to cover up when redecorating later. Unless of course there are so many new holes that it is really unsightly and warrants being entirely repainted. I never insist that the work is carried out professionally but always advise that any repair needs to be in keeping with the high standard of the property.

        That said, I also turn a blind eye for an easy life when the tenants have otherwise been really great and it is only a couple of hooks.
        Assume I know nothing.

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        • #5
          The retrospective permission with appropriate conditions is a very good idea. Like you I want an easy life and don't want this to blow up later. The plastering was new when it was last decorated so I'm less inclined to turn a blind eye because it is so new.
          Thanks for that!

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