T friend's L is suing her as she let me stay temporarily

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  • Moderator1
    replied
    To keep this thread focussed, less-serious posts have been moved (or copied) to a 'Take A Break' thread:
    http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums...hlight=jeffrey

    Leave a comment:


  • teeps
    replied
    now now boys! rather than be concerned about the possibility people from overseas holidaying next door to me,I was more concerned about the procession of big hairy dogs that kept coming with the holidaymakers, considering it was a no pets policy let! also the tenants "rented" my property out to others and went to stay with his son!

    Leave a comment:


  • jeffrey
    replied
    Originally posted by teeps View Post
    this also brings to mind an occasion when I rented a house in devon on an AST, next door to where I lived myself and the tenants started to do holiday swaps and I found myself living next door to strangers for the whole summer whilst my tenants were staying all over the world. it took a while to convince them that this was not on!
    So, teeps, for the benefit of mind the gap, what can you tell us about next door? Were its official tenants exchanging with UK Nationals or 'Others'?

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  • mind the gap
    replied
    Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
    These UK websites list timeshares etc. which their members can exchange with each other.
    You are assuming (why?) that teeps' tenant organised swaps of timeshare properties. They were just as likely to have organised home/house-swaps on a one-off basis. The two things are rather different. For one thing, I understand that for timeshare swaps, you have to supply clear evidence that you own the timeshare property before any company will accept you. Straightforward holiday exchanges involving your principal home (either rented or owner occupied) are easier to arrange.

    You really have got a bee in your bonnet, haven't you?

    Leave a comment:


  • jeffrey
    replied
    Evidence: http://uk.ask.com/web?q=internationa...=196&o=0&l=dir.
    These UK websites list timeshares etc. which their members can exchange with each other.

    Leave a comment:


  • mind the gap
    replied
    Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
    No. Assume several UK Nationals. One owns a timeshare in Spain; one in Italy; one in Portugal. They swap. This is much more likely the case.
    And your evidence for that is...?

    The simple truth is that teeps' tenant could have organised house-swaps either with UK nationals or with non-UK nationals. Both scenarios are perfectly possible (there are lots of companies which exist to help people organise such exchanges and they do not discriminate on grounds of nationality); I allowed for both in my answer. Honestly, anyone reading this without knowing you might assume you don't like the idea of foreign people living in British homes for the summer. I'm sure that isn't the case.

    If you are so bored that you need to try to pick lumps out of me, please find something more productive to do!

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  • jeffrey
    replied
    No. Assume several UK Nationals. One owns a timeshare in Spain; one in Italy; one in Portugal. They swap. This is much more likely the case.

    Leave a comment:


  • mind the gap
    replied
    Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
    teeps did not mention foreigners! Is this your famous vehemence resurfacing?
    Sigh. No, rather your famous determination to make something out of nothing.

    Think about it logically. If T has done 'holiday swaps' and is thus able to spend his summmer in other people's homes (the people he has done 'swaps' - ie exchanges - with) 'all over the world', then it is logical to assume that some of those new occupants, at least, are foreigners. However, since it is also possible that some (or all) of the swaps were with British people who own property either abroad or in the UK, that is why I said 'foreigners/strangers'.

    I hope that answers your carp.

    Please spare us the fish puns

    Leave a comment:


  • jeffrey
    replied
    Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
    I cannot think that legally, an objection to subletting can be based on the fact that you as LL were obliged to live next door to people you did not know, whilst the original neighbours were holidaying elsewhere.

    In other words, your objection would have to be based on a proven breach of contract by your T, rather than on your personal prejudice about not wanting foreigners/strangers in the house next door to yours..
    teeps did not mention foreigners! Is this your famous vehemence resurfacing?

    Leave a comment:


  • mind the gap
    replied
    Originally posted by teeps View Post
    this also brings to mind an occasion when I rented a house in devon on an AST, next door to where I lived myself and the tenants started to do holiday swaps and I found myself living next door to strangers for the whole summer whilst my tenants were staying all over the world. it took a while to convince them that this was not on!
    I cannot think that legally, an objection to subletting can be based on the fact that you as LL were obliged to live next door to people you did not know, whilst the original neighbours were holidaying elsewhere.

    In other words, your objection would have to be based on a proven breach of contract by your T, rather than on your personal prejudice about not wanting foreigners/strangers in the house next door to yours..

    Leave a comment:


  • teeps
    replied
    this also brings to mind an occasion when I rented a house in devon on an AST, next door to where I lived myself and the tenants started to do holiday swaps and I found myself living next door to strangers for the whole summer whilst my tenants were staying all over the world. it took a while to convince them that this was not on!

    Leave a comment:


  • jeffrey
    replied
    Originally posted by teeps View Post
    this situation can also raise single occupancy for council tax purposes,as my son found out to his cost. similar circumstances when he had a friend stay with him from overseas, person not contributing to household in any manner, but someone from the council contacted him to say they had reason to believe that someone else was resident
    Yes, the Council were correct. Single occupancy (and its 25% discount) depends on only one adult residing.

    Leave a comment:


  • teeps
    replied
    this situation can also raise single occupancy for council tax purposes,as my son found out to his cost. similar circumstances when he had a friend stay with him from overseas, person not contributing to household in any manner, but someone from the council contacted him to say they had reason to believe that someone else was resident

    Leave a comment:


  • jeffrey
    replied
    Was the friend a long-leaseholder or only an Assured Shorthold Tenant?

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  • Telometer
    replied
    Silly Landlord. Wasting everybody's time and his own money.

    Unless of course there's more to this story than you are admitting?

    Leave a comment:

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