Prospective T's pets; charging extra for likely damage?

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  • Prospective T's pets; charging extra for likely damage?

    Hi my first post on here.

    I have a tenant who owns 2 cats interested in moving into a newly decorated and refurbished flat. I normally request 4 weeks deposit and the rental is £592 pcm.

    Not having rented out to anyone with pets before I am concerned of the state of the carpets, furnishings at the end of the tenancy but don't want to discriminate - so is it acceptable to say to anyone with pets there is a pet subsidy on the rent of say £75 pcm which should cover the cost of replacing the carpets and other soft furnishings at the end of the tenancy if need be?

  • #2
    The contract should at least state that the property should have a deinfestation clean at the end of the tenancy.

    Rather than a subsidy, I would say a higher bond would be more fitting.

    There is a case, and I forget the details, where carpets were laid for a tenant at the start of a tenancy with a subsidy on the rent.
    The tenants made off with the carpets and the court ruled that they had a right to do so as they had paid for the carpets through the subsidy.
    If I am offering advice, I am doing so purely because I think I know the answer and would like to help, but... and its a big but, I do occasionally get things wrong, as anyone does.

    So please don't sue.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by joshdhaliwal View Post
      Not having rented out to anyone with pets before I am concerned of the state of the carpets, furnishings at the end of the tenancy but don't want to discriminate - so is it acceptable to say to anyone with pets there is a pet subsidy on the rent of say £75 pcm which should cover the cost of replacing the carpets and other soft furnishings at the end of the tenancy if need be?
      I think in effect you would indeed be discriminating against them, as by asking them to pay £75 over the normal(?) market rate, you're giving them what is sometimes known impolitely as an 'eff-off' price.

      If you are interested in letting to them, better to increase the deposit above normal if you want, and make it clear in writing that you'd expect any pet-related damage or mess to be rectified from that at the end of the tenancy. And then make sure you have an accurate and water-tight check-in inventory!

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      • #4
        My own terms are double deposit. The actual wording I use is...

        I am a dog owner myself. Even the best-trained pets can have 'accidents', so it is necessary to increase the deposit requirement for pet owners to an amount equivalent to 2 months rent. The deposits are kept in the government approved “Deposit Protection Scheme” and can be re-paid in full at the end of the tenancy so long as there is no damage or rent outstanding.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by joshdhaliwal View Post
          I have a tenant who owns 2 cats interested in moving into a newly decorated and refurbished flat.
          You are a leaseholder. Read your lease. Does it prohibit/restrict the keeping of animals?
          JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
          1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
          2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
          3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
          4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Ericthelobster View Post
            If you are interested in letting to them, better to increase the deposit above normal if you want, and make it clear in writing that you'd expect any pet-related damage or mess to be rectified from that at the end of the tenancy. And then make sure you have an accurate and water-tight check-in inventory!
            Agreed. And make professional cleaning of all carpets and soft-furnishings non-negotiable (i.e. regardless of any visible, or smellable, damage) as future tenants might be allergic to essence of cat.

            Might also be worth removing or protecting any particularly vulnerable furniture. Cats always scratch furniture, however well-behaved the T claims their cats are. For example, valances to protect divan bases, cheap off-the-shelf loose covers for sofa/armchairs. Tell T about 'Soft Paws'
            http://www.spuk.com/

            Cats may also urinate indoors - I had one tenant whose cat peed on the fitted coir matting in the hallway. The whole house stank to high heaven, so when it came to viewings at the end of the tenancy, it was pretty much impossible as the smell was so awful. I only discovered the exact source of the smell after the tenant left.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by westminster View Post
              Tell T about 'Soft Paws' http://www.spuk.com/
              Blimey - wouldn't want to risk fitting those to our moggy - might lose an arm!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Ericthelobster View Post
                Blimey - wouldn't want to risk fitting those to our moggy - might lose an arm!
                I admit I haven't road-tested these personally, but I'm planning to as and when I get another cat. My last cat shredded everything (but did not pee indoors).

                Comment


                • #9
                  Even the best-trained pets can have 'accidents'...The deposits are kept in the government approved “Deposit Protection Scheme” and can be re-paid in full at the end of the tenancy.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
                    Aside from the fact it's a 'Service' not a 'Scheme' have I goofed here? (be gentle with me)

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Snorkerz View Post
                      Aside from the fact it's a 'Service' not a 'Scheme' have I goofed here? (be gentle with me)
                      Accidents.....deposits....!!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Aha! Yes, when I first described this to a prospective tenant I did refer to it as a doggie deposit.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks!

                          Thanks to everyone for your comments - that's very useful! Very much appreciated.

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