Inventory

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Inventory

    Hi All

    In order for an inventory to be valid, does it need to be signed by the tennant? Mine has his name on the top(copy given to me by estate agent, though agent is no longer in the loop though) and my tennant has the same copy.

    It states 1 x sofa although the guy delivered 2 x 2 seater sofas for the same price as they were only ones in stock, the tennants say they will say there was only one sofa there (in court), so they only will have to pay half, they are playing real dirty now. They said the spring came up and injured them but now are saying nothing with regards to injury although it may come up again.

    The damage to the ceiling, they said previous tenants got in and did this.
    The blinds, they said are in the loft, I've looked everywhere and they've left an old mattress and old chair there but no blinds!
    Shelves in the bedroom, one is missing, again thought it may be in the loft but its not there.

    As a result of all the replacement/damages flat is still not rented out and it'll be a month at the end of this week, is there any way I can claim loss of rent in any way/form?

    Light fittings - can lampshades which have gone missing also be claimed as being a light fitting? There were two, both in the bedrooms, I even have pictures of the previous ones, but the tenannts say there weren't any.

    In the letter I sent to them, as I thought there were too many things to mention and some could be fair wear and tear e.g. broken pull-out drawer in kitchen, all bathroom accessories needed replacing, including handheld shower etc...I only mentioned those things I thought I could claim on in inventory. Should I write about these now also to back my case, to say these were all replaced/repaired but I didn't claim for these? If I counter-claimed for all these the bill would be higher than the deposit!

    Thanks
    Shetal

  • #2
    An inventory without a tenants signature is not worth the paper it is written on....without proof that the tenant agreed, you could have typed up any old inventory yesterday. Did the estate agent prepare and deal with the inventory?
    Any posts by myself are my opinion ONLY. They should never be taken as correct or factual without confirmation from a legal professional. All information is given without prejudice or liability.

    Comment


    • #3
      An accurate inventory of contents with a note of their condition e.g. "new", "as new" or note minor damage if signed on each page by both the landlord and tenant will be conclusive evidence in Court. It is also important to note the condition of the structural parts e.g. doors, windows, sinks and bathroom fittings and the state of decoration.

      Your delivery notes and invoices may be able to prove the expense for two sofas. Could the tenant be able to state on of the sofas had been removed after delivery? The evidence concerning the sofas will show the Court that your inventory was not kept properly up to date and might.

      In the case of dispute if at the end of the tenancy the landlord and tenant amend the incoming inventory and note missing items or damages this will provide conclusive evidence to the Court.

      Photographs that are listed and dated so as to show the missing or damaged items will provide valuable evidence
      Vic - wicked landlord
      Any advice or suggestions given in my posts are intended for guidance only and not a substitute for completing full searches on this forum, having regard to the advice of others, or seeking appropriate professional opinion.
      Without Plain English Codes of Practice and easy to complete Prescribed Forms the current law is too complex and is thus neither fair to good tenants nor good landlords.

      Comment


      • #4
        Inventory

        Hi

        Thanks for your replies, the inventory was typed up by the agents and was attached to the contract, in the contract it states that the inventory forms part of the contract together with fixtures and fittings, all of which I have photographs of.

        Everything was pointed out to the tennants that items were missing and they still denied it. I have receipts of everything which show everything was new (all of which was bought from one major furniture retailer) so will produce these in court. I've got 2 quotes from builders to do the work and they both say roughly the same.

        I guess its all upto the judge now to see who they believe and unless they
        have photographic evidence to back them up, I don't think their case can stand in court.

        Am filling out the form tonight and doing the calculations tonight and it is higher than the deposit! They'll be in for a shock!

        Thanks for your advice,
        Shetal

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by shetal

          I guess its all upto the judge now to see who they believe and unless they
          have photographic evidence to back them up, I don't think their case can stand in court.
          Wouldn't be so sure....the onus is on you to prove damages, rather than on them to prove otherwise.
          Any posts by myself are my opinion ONLY. They should never be taken as correct or factual without confirmation from a legal professional. All information is given without prejudice or liability.

          Comment


          • #6
            Inventory

            Hi Mr Shed

            So I have to prove that they damaged my flat and took my property right?
            Thats fine, I have pics of the damaged ceiling (and kitchen drawer etc...) and receipts for the blinds,sofa, light fittings. Also took videocamera with me too.
            Is this enough?
            Shetal

            Comment


            • #7
              Do you have before and after pictures?
              Any posts by myself are my opinion ONLY. They should never be taken as correct or factual without confirmation from a legal professional. All information is given without prejudice or liability.

              Comment


              • #8
                Shetal, be honest. You can’t prove the condition of the property at the time your tenants moved in because the “inventory” (huh!) was neither signed by the tenants nor yourself jointly and it’s inaccurate to boot.

                Fix the property up. Rent it out. Move on.

                You need to treat this as a lesson to be learned.

                Please share with us what steps you will take to ensure that your next letting goes as smoothly as possible.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Moving On

                  Hi Poppy

                  I wish I could move on, but they are taking me to court and so this is why I have to do all this. Maybe I should have cut my losses but the option is no longer there. So, just have to fight my case in court as much as I can now. If the judge throws it out, I'll be out of pocket, if they do believe me, then at least I'll get some money back. I know I might have to pay for court costs and am prepared to pay.

                  As soon as the court case is over, I'll be able to concentrate on the next steps.

                  Thanks
                  Shetal

                  Comment

                  Latest Activity

                  Collapse

                  • When do tenants' requests go too far?
                    Suzy76
                    Tenants moved in at the beginning of the year and have issued a stream of requests/demands since then, the main ones being

                    - After signing the contract but before moving in, requesting that I change the wallpaper in one room as they decided they didn't like the colour
                    - Asking to...
                    12-07-2017, 16:46 PM
                  • Reply to When do tenants' requests go too far?
                    Landlord1206
                    If you trust the tenant I would allow them to decorate upon approval. To agreed specifications and at THEIR EXPENSE. This improves the property and keeps them happy. I have had this happen, new paint colour in lounge. More difficult in your case with a new tenant so I would have said wait and see....then...
                    23-08-2017, 11:18 AM
                  • Private letting advice
                    xNicolex
                    My partner and I have recently moved into a private let with our 7 month old son.
                    now the flat was in a right state when we moved in - bathroom hadn't been cleaned, kitchen was a mess, oven absolutely caked in grease from the previous tenant (it still is, I refuse to clean it so I'm just not...
                    23-08-2017, 08:28 AM
                  • Reply to Private letting advice
                    xNicolex
                    Wannadonnadoodahl - a few of the issues were noticeable when we moved in, however the landlord reassured us they would be dealt with within a week or two, its now been 6 weeks

                    JK0 - we aren't on any benefits, we both work and have been full rent of £150 a week, which feels like robbery...
                    23-08-2017, 11:05 AM
                  • Reply to Private letting advice
                    Landlord1206
                    Not sure if you have a gas cooker or not. Either way, please check that you have a valid Gas Safe certificate. You do not mention the boiler but given the other issues, I hope this is safe for you.
                    You may wish to ask for a PAT on any electrical items.

                    Not sure why you moved in given...
                    23-08-2017, 11:02 AM
                  • TT not leaving
                    johnson13
                    A friend of mine (LL) rents his property through an agent and has asked them to get the tenant out as he's coming back to live in it. The agent served a S21 notice which is due to expire soon (we'll check, but for the purposes of this post assume that everything has been served correctly and the notice...
                    23-08-2017, 09:00 AM
                  • Reply to TT not leaving
                    Darth Wookie
                    The tenant may be 'morally' in the wrong, but is legally in the right. They have no outright legal obligation to leave at the end of the tenancy agreement, which can only be truly ended by the court. In essence, the court are the 'adjudicators' of the contract and decide whether to enforce it or not....
                    23-08-2017, 09:43 AM
                  • Reply to TT not leaving
                    jpkeates
                    The current tenancy continues until the landlord has recovered possession (or the tenant serves notice) so there's no danger of a new one coming into being accidentally .

                    The tenant is awarded costs if they lose, which is pretty standard in legal cases. If the landlord loses the case, the...
                    23-08-2017, 09:38 AM
                  • Reply to TT not leaving
                    johnson13
                    Ok, thanks. This seems to imply that the tenant is in the wrong by not leaving then.

                    The notice might as well say, "you don't have to leave when this notice expires, but you'll have a large legal bill if you don't."



                    Thanks again.

                    Is this...
                    23-08-2017, 09:19 AM
                  • Reply to TT not leaving
                    jpkeates
                    The landlord can carry on accepting rent, which is due until the tenancy ends.

                    The tenant has every right to stay, as the landlord's notice doesn't actually end the tenancy. To bring the tenancy to an end, the landlord will need to go to court. If the landlord is successful, the tenant...
                    23-08-2017, 09:12 AM
                  Working...
                  X