Problem With Electric Reading by EX Tenant

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    Problem With Electric Reading by EX Tenant

    Had a bad tenant leave a flat at the end of August, I since got a bill from EON the electric company with a bill on my name titled Landlord, I read the meter and the reading is almost 1000 units different,

    The bill dated last week states I took a reading when the tenant moved out, although this was the tenants reading when in EON's language means the new account was opened with this false reading

    Ive taken a picture of the meter, and the Neighbours in the flat downstairs can confirm the date they moved out, as well they can confirm the property has been unoccupied for the past month,

    The meters are located in the basement of the property and not accessible by the meter readers usually.

    Im just wondering if this situation must have happened to other landlords out there, the tenants where terrible as they left owing me rent and i had to evict them, also the flat was left in a mess

    Ive got a bad feeling eon are going to take the tenants side of things and i'll end up paying

    #2
    Unfortunately, as LL it is your repsonsibility to take a meter reading on the day the tenants move out (or very shortly afterwards) and to inform the utility provider of the reading so they can charge the Ts the correct amount.

    If you have failed to do this, then I think you may indeed end up liable for the bill, unfair as it may seem, unless you can persuade Eon that the T's reading was way out.

    In my experience they are generally not very interested, but it is worth a try.

    Good luck.
    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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      #3
      It has never ever (yet) been the LEGAL responsibility of a landlord to notify the relevant utility of an incoming or outgoing tenant. It is the legal responsibility of the tenant arriving and leaving.

      However, it is good practice for landlord to do this. There are moves afoot that may make it a legal requirement that the landlord notifies the WATER authority of a new tenant moving in and a tenancy terminating which is going to lead to all sorts of problems - what if the landlord did notify BUT somehow the WB does not log it - mistakes happen?

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        #4
        Sorry, yes, I didn't mean it was a legal requirement so much as a responsibility towards your 'business' -it's not in your interests for it to be left to the tenant, (even though strictly speaking they should do it in their own) interests.

        It's also in your interest as LL to agree the meter reading with Ts on last day and that reading given to provider so there can be no disputes about who owes how much.
        'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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          #5
          When the tenant moved out in August did you take meter readings that day and inform the utilities that you are now the bill-payer? If not, unfortunately you now know what happens when you don't. Please do not leave such matters to tenants in future. Always read the meters for incoming and outgoing tenants and take control of name changeovers.

          I really don't know how you will be able to distinguish between your ex-tenant's and your own usage.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by davidjohnbutton View Post
            It has never ever (yet) been the LEGAL responsibility of a landlord to notify the relevant utility of an incoming or outgoing tenant. It is the legal responsibility of the tenant arriving and leaving.

            However, it is good practice for landlord to do this.
            Indeed, and pretty vital if there's any sort of void between tenants... because the utiity co will always insist on someone being responsible for the supply, even if the property is vacant, so the minute the outgoing tenant notifies the utility co of their readings, then by default the owner of the property becomes liable.

            Like Poppy I always keep control of meter readings anyway between tenancies; but it's certainly vital when there's a void.

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