Locks/lights defective- so landlord negligent if burglary?

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    #16
    Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
    Out of what?!
    'Out policemen' is probably a G20 protestor's illiterate chant.
    Or the opposite of 'In policemen'; if you take out the 'in', it leaves 'polcema'.
    JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
    1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
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      #17
      In October 2007 four burglars broke into my house at 4:20 a.m., I am a systems engineer and have my own home made security system, five IP cameras and a PIR light switch in the lounge (plus several other devices). The burglars were recorded from the time they arrived in their car to the time they left. They stole my car keys (but not the car) my wallet, and my prescription sunglasses. They were in the house for just 20 seconds, frightened off by the lounge lights automatically turning on.

      I didn’t even know we had been burgled until I checked the security recordings when I got to work, they locked the door on the way out, I just couldn’t find my wallet and car keys when I got up that day.

      Five people were arrested and convicted in relation to the burglary, and I was told they were from two teams working the area.

      They had already been arrested when I saw my company Amex statement a few weeks later and there was a petrol charge for about £15, but I always fill up so it was strange, it was from the morning of the burglary. The police picked up the security recordings from the petrol station for even more evidence.
      I also post as Moderator2 when moderating

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        #18
        Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
        Who says out policemen are not wonderful?
        Who? Like Brian Paddick you mean?
        Health Warning


        I try my best to be accurate, but please bear in mind that some posts are written in a matter of seconds and often cannot be edited later on.

        All information contained in my posts is given without any assumption of responsibility on my part. This means that if you rely on my advice but it turns out to be wrong and you suffer losses (of any kind) as a result, then you cannot sue me.

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          #19
          Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
          Out of what?!
          Were it not the case that "r" is next to "t" I would put that down as a Freudian slip. "Out" policeman are bound to be wonderful.

          I typ fast, bit inaccruateyl1.

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            #20
            Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
            Were it not the case that "r" is next to "t" I would put that down as a Freudian slip. "Out" policeman are bound to be wonderful.

            I typ fast, bit inaccruateyl1.
            I agree with Crawluncher! Outies are best, whether navels or policemen. There's nothing more depressing than an 'in' policeman.
            'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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              #21
              Originally posted by bunny View Post

              As a student, returned home from a drunken end of term night out. Didn't notice the back door kicked in or the microwave missing having walked through the kitchen, staggered up the stairs, passed the odd random shoe, a few study books on the stairs etc.
              Obviously a good night out!

              Didn't notice the front door kicked in? You weren't in Byker, (Newcastle), were you, by any chance?!
              'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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                #22
                Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                Outies are best, whether navels or policemen.
                When it comes to navels, innies are best. They are useful as somewhere to keep the salt when you are eating in bed.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
                  When it comes to navels, innies are best. They are useful as somewhere to keep the salt when you are eating in bed.
                  I think not. The salt has a dreadful tendency to get mixed up with the fluff, unless one scrubs one's navel out with a toothbrush before eating chips in bed. Life's too short.

                  And outie navels are always good indicators of an umbilical hernia, which it is better to know about than ignore.
                  'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                    Obviously a good night out!

                    Didn't notice the front door kicked in? You weren't in Byker, (Newcastle), were you, by any chance?!
                    Yes, it was a great night as I recall! No, not Newcastle but another northern town. And it was the back door not the front so I think I can be excused for not noticing it had been kicked in ! It was nothing to do with the alcohol


                    Well done you Mars Mug! Don't you just love techies! My house is a bit like fort knox now but not to your extent with lights coming on. Yet another success of a burglar being caught!!!

                    (Isn't it grammatically incorrect to start a new sentence with "and"? Ahh what the heck!)

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by bunny View Post

                      (Isn't it grammatically incorrect to start a new sentence with "and"? Ahh what the heck!)
                      Only in formal written texts! LLZ = only moderately formal and people often write as they speak, especially in less serious posts. So it's fine. And if it isn't...tough!
                      'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by bunny View Post
                        Well done you Mars Mug! Don't you just love techies! My house is a bit like fort knox now but not to your extent with lights coming on. Yet another success of a burglar being caught!!!
                        I think something like 12-16 were caught, two teams, but we were only informed about the 5 directly connected to our burglary.

                        The light switch is not expensive, and just replaces a normal single way switch;

                        http://www.maplin.co.uk/Module.aspx?ModuleNo=45045

                        I have my house wired up, recordings last up to six months. Even my shed is on the internet with its own e-mail account, it gets lots of spam mail for Viagra etc. When someone goes in the shed the pressure mat, door switch, and PIR all send me an e-mail.

                        It has also helped with Mrs Mug’s grass cutting activities. I was able to monitor at work how long it took her to cut the top lawn and suggest an enhanced route round the lawn to reduce the cutting time (went from 15 minutes to less than 10).
                        I also post as Moderator2 when moderating

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by Mars Mug View Post
                          It has also helped with Mrs Mug’s grass cutting activities. I was able to monitor at work how long it took her to cut the top lawn and suggest an enhanced route round the lawn to reduce the cutting time (went from 15 minutes to less than 10).
                          Let me get this straight. Your shed has an email account and it spies on your wife? And, then, using the intelligence that your shed gathered on your wife, you calculated the optimum grass-cutting route, which you now expect her to follow when mowing the lawn?

                          Are you serious? Are you still married?
                          Health Warning


                          I try my best to be accurate, but please bear in mind that some posts are written in a matter of seconds and often cannot be edited later on.

                          All information contained in my posts is given without any assumption of responsibility on my part. This means that if you rely on my advice but it turns out to be wrong and you suffer losses (of any kind) as a result, then you cannot sue me.

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                            #28
                            The shed does know when anyone goes in there and it sends me e-mails to let me know, but it does not spy on Mrs Mug, I do that from work using the time-stamped motion detection security camera that overlooks the back garden.

                            I am serious, most things on my network have e-mail accounts, I even have a hard drive that sends me an e-mail at 9:00 p.m. each day to tell me how it is feeling and how full it is.

                            I am not married to Mrs Mug, though we have been engaged for about 15 years.
                            I also post as Moderator2 when moderating

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by Mars Mug View Post
                              It has also helped with Mrs Mug’s grass cutting activities. I was able to monitor at work how long it took her to cut the top lawn and suggest an enhanced route round the lawn to reduce the cutting time (went from 15 minutes to less than 10).
                              So with all that time she saved, what other jobs did you add to her workload?
                              We don't want her idling around do we.
                              I offer no guarantee that anything I say is correct. wysiwyg

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                                #30
                                Her initial route round the lawn was somewhat erratic, a bit like a bumper car at a fairground (thankfully she does not drive), I simply suggested a more efficient route when mowing the lawn.

                                I also have a lounge camera so know when she is dusting, but I’m not too good at dusting myself so leave her to it. The other four cameras are external so I can’t monitor her washing up and ironing, though I can tell when she is ironing because the front camera is in the kitchen and fogs up a little in winter.
                                I also post as Moderator2 when moderating

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