Tenant wants to keep a pet

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    Tenant wants to keep a pet

    What are the legitmate arguments for not allowing a tenant to keep a domestic pet, eg. cat

    #2
    Originally posted by EdwardM View Post
    What are the legitmate arguments for not allowing a tenant to keep a domestic pet, eg. cat
    I'll get the ball rolling, shall I?
    • They have fleas (which lay eggs in the carpet which will hatch out, and after the cat (their mealticket) has quit, will then go for humans (next tenant)instead
    • They will scratch the carpet and furniture to bits
    • They will pee and poo all over the place, especially when stressed
    • Consider how cat will come and go - does this involve leaving a window open permanently (= security risk and possibly invalidating insurance) or carving up your back door to fit a cat flap?


    "But mine is a good cat which doesn't do any of those things"... yeah, right.

    Any more for any more?

    Comment


      #3
      If you are in a flat, check your lease first. The freeholder may also need to give permission for pets.

      Other than that, it depends on the pet. Fish, iguanas, hamsters etc are rarely any trouble.
      Cats do get fleas, & do scratch carpets- even the most housetrained ones. Add a cat clause, including professional cleaning & defleaing of carpets, & take a larger deposit. Other than that, one or two cats are rarely trouble. A window locked open at 10cm may invalidate the tenant's contents insurance, but how would this affect the landlord?

      With dogs, it depends who is home during the day with them. If the plan (as one potential tenant suggested) was to leave their huge dog locked inside alone all day with the TV for company whilst he worked, I'd worry.

      Comment


        #4
        Tenant wants to keep a pet

        Useful info to counter a tenant request, but would like to know [legal] position re lease.
        Would an exclusion of pets, even named/ species, count as an unfair clause?

        Comment


          #5
          see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums...ad.php?t=12456

          I thought I remembered posting on this previously !
          A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.
          W.Churchill

          Comment


            #6
            I dont really see the problem in allowing T's to keep pets (within reason!!) as long as the LL is aware of all the additional risks as listed above and then charges a larger deposit as a result. My neighbours have a cat (which really means that I have a cat too but without any of the vets bills or costs which is an ideal arrangement for me)

            anyway, they paid nearly double the deposit I paid to cover any costs that may be incurred as a result of keeping the pet, they were happy to do so as they know their cat is 'well behaved' hmmmm its a good way to call a T's bluff if they know their pet is a right old mess then they know they are gunna lose most of/a large chunk of their deposit.

            Comment


              #7
              Getting another thread out of the gutter and back to the original question.... I am a tenant and have pets (they have been called a zoo on here recently!) However, I have insurance on the animals which includes any damage that they might cause to LL's property and have supplied insurance certs to LL. I gave an extra deposit as a gesture of goodwill in case any damage was caused to both the interior and exterior of the property (yes pets can make a huge mess of the garden if left unsupervised! Not just the pooping thing but dogs dig holes, cats scratch fences etc) And I have an appendix attached to TA stating the terms and conditions of keeping the pets.

              BUT I do have someone at home the whole time with my pets; I have made every possible effort to protect the LL's property and I have agreed to have the carpets professionally cleaned before I leave the property after all my furniture etc has been removed.

              AND not all cats have fleas - some of are responsible pet owners who do take our animals to the vets regularly as a precaution so they don't get these kinds of problems. I've got 9 cats and 2 dogs and never ever had a flea in my house!!!

              PM me if you want details of insurance etc oh and yes it does cover if the dog bites the LL

              Comment


                #8
                I suspect many children are worse than any pet.

                I just rented a new place and found no shortage of LLs who were OK with our Jack Rascal. But by now we have good refs with regards to the mutt.
                Now signature free.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Ericthelobster View Post
                  I'll get the ball rolling, shall I?
                  • They have fleas (which lay eggs in the carpet which will hatch out, and after the cat (their mealticket) has quit, will then go for humans (next tenant)instead
                  • They will scratch the carpet and furniture to bits
                  • They will pee and poo all over the place, especially when stressed
                  • Consider how cat will come and go - does this involve leaving a window open permanently (= security risk and possibly invalidating insurance) or carving up your back door to fit a cat flap?


                  "But mine is a good cat which doesn't do any of those things"... yeah, right.

                  Any more for any more?
                  Sorry to disappoint, but...

                  1. Frontline - kills fleas (and flea eggs). It's the only treatment that does, which is why we use it.
                  2. Nope. Ours have scratching posts to do that on.
                  3. Nar, they prefer to use the cat litters and do it pretty well.
                  4. Indoor cats.

                  "But mine is a good cat which doesn't do any of those things"... yup they BOTH sure are good cats, and nope they don't do any of those...all four points have been proven by all our deposits (by 3 separate LLS) being returned IN FULL, (minus previously agreed cleaning costs), all with full inventories and check-ins/outs by inventory clerks. Oh, and two landlord inspections with no problem.

                  Of course I can appreciate that my cats are better trained than others, so if I was LL I'd probably make sure that the deposit completely covered anything that cats could destroy (not just soft furnishings, but wallpaper, wooden fixtures/fittings). Also I'd probably want T to cover cleaning and flea treating the property afterwards just in case.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by shropet View Post
                    Would an exclusion of pets, even named/ species, count as an unfair clause?
                    Hi

                    A prohibition on the keeping of pets would not be "unfair".

                    Preston

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Preston View Post
                      A prohibition on the keeping of pets would not be "unfair".
                      Have you read the OFT guidance on this? See p64: http://www.oft.gov.uk/shared_oft/rep...rms/oft356.pdf

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Ericthelobster View Post
                        Have you read the OFT guidance on this? See p64: http://www.oft.gov.uk/shared_oft/rep...rms/oft356.pdf
                        Hi

                        Yes I have but you are right to draw attention to it; the "goldish" point is a valid one and coincidentally I amended a tenancy agreement just last week for this very reason.

                        Preston

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Preston View Post
                          Hi

                          Yes I have but you are right to draw attention to it; the "goldish" point is a valid one and coincidentally I amended a tenancy agreement just last week for this very reason.

                          Preston
                          It is an interesting question.

                          Is there a universally accepted definition of 'a pet'?

                          Personally I would not class a goldfish as a pet, as it seems to me that one has to have some reciprocal emotional interaction with a pet and that is clearly not the case with goldfish. They just swim round in a tank/bowl and couldn't care less who you are, as long as you chuck some food in every so often.

                          Similarly, a gerbil kept in a cage, fed and kept free of disease may be a pet (if someone likes it as an individual). If no-one is interested in it at a personal level, it is just a gerbil in a cage and not a pet. It might as well be a laboratory animal.
                          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                            It is an interesting question.

                            Is there a universally accepted definition of 'a pet'?

                            Personally I would not class a goldfish as a pet, as it seems to me that one has to have some reciprocal emotional interraction with a pet and that is clearly not the case with goldfish. They just swim round in a tank/bowl and couldn't care less who you are, as long as you chuck some food in every so often.

                            Similarly, a gerbil kept in a cage, fed and kept free of disease may be a pet (if someone likes it as an individual). If no-one is interested in it at a personal level, it is just a gerbil in a cage and not a pet. It might as well be a laboratory animal.
                            I once had an hour long interview with a homeless man with a rat on his shoulder. It was a nice, well behaved rat (with the colouring of a heffer). I failed to convince him, though, that having it as a pet - let alone having it sit on his shoulder - might have an impact on his ability to find accommodation.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Preston View Post
                              I once had an hour long interview with a homeless man with a rat on his shoulder. It was a nice, well behaved rat (with the colouring of a heffer). I failed to convince him, though, that having it as a pet - let alone having it sit on his shoulder - might have an impact on his ability to find accommodation.
                              Eek One of the dubious pleasures of teaching English is that kids have to do 'talks' for the class and they often elect to do them about their 'pets'. (Their unbounded affection for these smelly, scraggy mutts/furballs, etc., never fails to amaze me). Over the years, my classroom floor has been mightily abused by any number of small mammals, (apart from the pupils, I mean), including cats, lambs, black rats, a mutantly large and extremely excitable poodle and four Labrador puppies from the same litter (sweet but leaky). I have also had to listen to eulogies to snakes* (one of which escaped from its tank during the lesson), to a colony of slugs, to an unbelievably vicious parrot and to some kind of very arrogant -looking white cockerel with a pedigree three feet long (we did that one outside as the fowl had an upset stomach that day. Apparently).

                              (*In fact, I think that snakes, like goldfish, do not care who you are or whether you love them or not, do they?)

                              The collective noun for slugs is probably not colony, but I don't know what it is.
                              'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                              Comment

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