potential problem neighbour

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    potential problem neighbour

    I have a potential scenario here.

    We have a neighbour who is basically a moaning busybody. She is the stereotype widow in her 60s, doesn't work, spends all day nosing out of the window and moans about absolutely everything. Rings the parking wardens when the day care nurses park on the double yellows for 15 mins while going into tend to the bed-ridden lady next door - that kind of thing. She also seems unable to sleep and has her TV/radio on ALL night, which is annoying. So that's the scene painted!

    We have not told her yet that we are moving and plan to rent out our house - but I am willing to bet she will MOAN when we do.

    So, just suppose after a few months our tenants give notice to quit, and give the reason that she is constantly moaning, and her TV is annoying them. Would we have any grounds to sue her for loss of income / inconvenience or similar if we could get our tenants reasons for going in writing?

    Again, this is hypothetical, but one can't rule anything out with her!

    #2
    Has the possibility occurred to you that perhaps she may be as glad to see the back of you, as you will be of her, and that any tenants who move in may get on with her like a house on fire - especially if they do not stereotype her , or complain about her as much as you have done here?
    There may well be reasons for her behaviour ; she may be hard of hearing; she may be ill; she may have disabilities; she may be lonely.

    Just a thought

    The simple answer to your (rather silly) question is : No, you cannot sue her.
    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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      #3
      I doubt it - and even if you could I would think long and hard before considering it. If you sue her you will have to declare this as a dispute when you come to sell the house so you would be pretty likely to be shooting yourself in the foot with both barrels.

      I shouldn't think you have much of case anyway on the basis you describe anyway. Reporting people who are breaking the law (however trivial you may think it is) can hardly be classed as haressement.

      You can get the council environment people involved on the noise front if you must and they can apply pressure but the TV would have to pretty loud for them to take it seriously and this would also have to be declared as dispute when selling.

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        #4
        That neighbour may well be the one who spots a burglar breaking into a house and phones the police. Is this a next door neighbour who you can hear through a party wall?
        I also post as Moderator2 when moderating

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          #5
          Be Careful

          I have a degree of sympathy for you as I have come across people of that ilk too.
          Really, it depends on how bad it is.
          I would certianly advise you to keep a written record of any abusive behaviour or annoyance your neighbour causes you or your tenants.
          Keep a record of the date and time things happened and what you did about it.
          If you can prove a pattern of adverse behaviour (especially with different people in your property suffering in the same way) then all the better and the local government's ASBO team could act if the behaviour was sufficiently bad.
          However, be aware that if you go down this route you would need to declare any formal complaints made about a neighbour if and when you come to sell the house.
          Regards
          David Lawrenson

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            #6
            For goodness' sake - this seems like a huge overreaction.

            Looking out of the window is not a crime, nor possible grounds for an ASBO.

            Having a TV on loudly is a matter for neighbourly negotiation - and if that fails, I suppose, eventually, the council Noise Abatement Officer.

            OP mentions however that the neighbour has 'moaned' about them, too. Perhaps it is they who behave unreasonably?

            Reporting illegal parking is not a crime; the opposite. Double yellow lines are there for safety reasons, and people should not park on them, not even nurses. Ambulances, in a medical emergency, fair enough. But not for routine personal care visits.

            I think the previous answer will serve only to encourage OP to demonise this elderly neighbour even more; they seem keen enough, without encouragement like this.
            'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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              #7
              Have you tried talking to her about the level of her TV? You know in a kind and gentle way - perhaps over a cup of tea and not being accusing at all. She is probably totally unaware that the noise is audible outside the property; many elderly people who live alone have a TV or radio at night for reasurance and companionship.

              As for watching out the window again this is a classic sign of lonliness, instead of complaining trying smiling and waving at her. She may well be calling parking warden etc for someone to speak to and see this as a form of company. Does she has many visitors? If she saw someone scrape you car and got all the details would you feel the same?

              Oh and if you want to borrow a neighbour who is definately deserving of an ASBO then you can borrow mine anytime (little old ladies don't try kicking your door in at 3am, physically threaten you and your property, smoke drugs on the street .... can you see where this is going and how pathetic you sound?

              I'd also have to question the type of LL you will make if this is how you react to a lonely old lady.

              (Moan over and yes I do feel better!)

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                #8

                I'm glad I wasn't the only one who thought along these lines....
                'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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