Tenant in shared house victimised by new arrival

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • mind the gap
    replied
    Originally posted by agent46 View Post
    BTW: the misconjugation(is there such a word) was, as always with my posts, caused by a rejig of a sentence which was not followed through in a sufficiently rigorous manner rather than a propensity for poor grammar.
    'No crack in a fortress may ever be accounted small...' (Danforth, The Crucible).

    It's that old poor gramma again.

    Granny


    Through every nook and every cranny
    The wind blew in on poor old Granny
    Around her knees, into each ear
    (And up nose as well, I fear)

    All through the night the wind grew worse
    It nearly made the vicar curse
    The top had fallen off the steeple
    Just missing him (and other people)

    It blew on man, it blew on beast
    It blew on nun, it blew on priest
    It blew the wig off Auntie Fanny-
    But most of all, it blew on Granny!

    Spike Milligan

    Leave a comment:


  • agent46
    replied
    Originally posted by mind the gap View Post

    (And I've never forgotten how to conjugate the verb ''to forget' either!)
    But, on the other hand, you have clearly forgetted how to use the "quote" function (you somehow quote-attibuted my post to yourself).

    BTW: the misconjugation(is there such a word?) was, as always with my posts, caused by a rejig of a sentence which was not followed through in a sufficiently rigorous manner, rather than a propensity towards poor grammar.

    Leave a comment:


  • mind the gap
    replied
    [QUOTE=agent46;121533]
    Originally posted by mind the gap View Post

    Ermmmm, I've sent empty envelopes through the post by mistake after forgotting to put the letter/cheque inside (look, it was late, I had a lot on my mind, I'd misplaced my glasses, I'd had my leg bitten off by a crocodile....)

    Well, I never have, even after dranking too much...

    (And I've never forgotten how to conjugate the verb ''to forget' either!)

    Leave a comment:


  • agent46
    replied
    [QUOTE=mind the gap;121530]
    Originally posted by newbie2009 View Post

    2) i received an empty envelope

    2 - Why on earth would any court believe that?
    Ermmmm, I've sent empty envelopes through the post by mistake after forgotting to put the letter/cheque inside (look, it was late, I had a lot on my mind, I'd misplaced my glasses, I'd had my leg bitten off by a crocodile....)

    Leave a comment:


  • mind the gap
    replied
    [QUOTE=newbie2009;121529]
    Originally posted by Paul Gibbs View Post
    it might be wise to do a letter to the LL stating that you and he agreed a surrender and you returned the keys to him, which he accepted - therefore he is not able to claim for further rent.

    this letter could then be used at court as evidence that you have not just 'created' this claim once court proceedings were issued.


    Would this actually work?
    The LL could just say one of the following:
    1) i didnt receive any letter. {but you could do a recorded delivery/signed for i suppose}
    2) i received an empty envelope
    1 - It is always possible - in fact it is imperative - to keep proof of service of documents which may be needed as evidence in court

    2 - Why on earth would any court believe that?

    Leave a comment:


  • newbie2009
    replied
    [QUOTE=Paul Gibbs;121372]it might be wise to do a letter to the LL stating that you and he agreed a surrender and you returned the keys to him, which he accepted - therefore he is not able to claim for further rent.

    this letter could then be used at court as evidence that you have not just 'created' this claim once court proceedings were issued.


    Would this actually work?
    The LL could just say one of the following:
    1) i didnt receive any letter. {but you could do a recorded delivery/signed for i suppose}
    2) i received an empty envelope

    Leave a comment:


  • agent46
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Gibbs View Post
    this letter could then be used at court as evidence that you have not just 'created' this claim once court proceedings were issued.

    Also, if LL does not reply to the letter then IMO it damages LL's case. The reason I say this is that if a reasonable LL (who disputed the surrender) receive that letter they would reply stating there was not an agreement for surrender. If LL does not reply then it suggests to the court that LL is trying it on
    Playing Devil's Advocate

    Strictly speaking he could not put that letter put such a letter in as evidence to prove his assertion that there was a surrender as it would contravene the rule against previous consistent statements. Such a letter would be admissible as evidence to rebut an allegation of recent fabrication, eg: if, as you suggest, the landlord asserts (in response to the claimant's case) that the claimant has invented the agreement at some point after the date of the letter. However, there is nothing to stop the landlord then replying, "Yes, but all this means is that the claimant had fabricated the claim at some point before the letter was sent. I didn't reply because it was such a pack of lies and I don't have the time to engage in stupid correspondence with dishonest people. I didn't really take it seriously, so I didn't take legal advice, and so I was not aware that failing to reply could damage my case."

    It could be relevant to the issue of costs, but I think its probabtive value as evidence to support the claim that there was an agreement is minimal.


    Oh, by the way, Paul, do you remember that £1,000,000 I lent to you recently? Well I'd like it back please asap (just preparing the ground for my upcoming claim against you)

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Gibbs
    replied
    it might be wise to do a letter to the LL stating that you and he agreed a surrender and you returned the keys to him, which he accepted - therefore he is not able to claim for further rent.

    this letter could then be used at court as evidence that you have not just 'created' this claim once court proceedings were issued.

    Also, if LL does not reply to the letter then IMO it damages LL's case. The reason I say this is that if a reasonable LL (who disputed the surrender) receive that letter they would reply stating there was not an agreement for surrender. If LL does not reply then it suggests to the court that LL is trying it on.

    Leave a comment:


  • charlieballtimore
    replied
    Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
    Your tutor will have your best interests at heart and he will be realistic enough about students generally to know that some of them are toe-rags who behave appallingly, and make life unbearable for others. He will, I'm sure, agree that you should not have had to live in fear of physical violence - no-body should. You may care to send him a brief note or email advising him that your ex-landlord, who agreed a surrender due to your having been assaulted in the property, but then went back on his word, has threatened to contact him about you. Say that you are resloving the issue but you would be grateful if he would refuse to discuss the matter (except with yourself, if he wishes).

    Honestly, he will not think any worse of you - he will just be glad to have been forewarned.
    Thank you, i will do this tomorrow morning. Thanks again

    Leave a comment:


  • mind the gap
    replied
    Originally posted by charlieballtimore View Post
    Im just worried this will reflect badly on me if my tutor was to find out.
    Your tutor will have your best interests at heart and he will be realistic enough about students generally to know that some of them are toe-rags who behave appallingly, and make life unbearable for others. He will, I'm sure, agree that you should not have had to live in fear of physical violence - no-body should. You may care to send him a brief note or email advising him that your ex-landlord, who agreed a surrender due to your having been assaulted in the property, but then went back on his word, has threatened to contact him about you. Say that you are resloving the issue but you would be grateful if he would refuse to discuss the matter (except with yourself, if he wishes).

    Honestly, he will not think any worse of you - he will just be glad to have been forewarned.

    Leave a comment:


  • charlieballtimore
    replied
    Im just worried this will reflect badly on me if my tutor was to find out.

    Thank you for your kind words. Guess the next stop is the CAB office

    Leave a comment:


  • davidjpowell
    replied
    If your concerned about him talking to your tutor, do this yourself. He/She woulb probably be able to point you in the way of some student support services that may be able to assist also.

    Leave a comment:


  • mind the gap
    replied
    Just to echo previous posts - don't worry! Your tutor would not discuss your conduct with a third party unconnected with the University (it would be a gross breach of your privacy and of his code of conduct to do so), unless, of course, you had asked him to give you a character reference, or similar, which is quite a different scenario.

    You could be the greatest reprobate in town (although I know you are not!) and your tutor would be unlikely to be interested as long as you behaved yourself on campus. I know this because we had a Law student who invited drug-dealers into our student property, was arrested by police twice for causing a disturbance and urinating in a public place, and was arrested twice in town centre bars for starting fights. We asked the police if we could inform his tutor, to be told, on no account. He won't be interested, and he would probably complain of harassment. And in your case, you haven't even done anything wrong!

    I wish you all the best in your studies, Charlie. My daughter does the same course as you and I know it is stressful enough without all this hassle. I do hope it is soon resolved.

    Leave a comment:


  • charlieballtimore
    replied
    No he doesnt know who my tutor is. He didnt ever ask for references from me. I asked him about references on the day i moved in and he said "we dont ask for refernces, if we like you, we let you move in"

    Leave a comment:


  • charlieballtimore
    replied
    THANK YOU THANK YOU SO SO MUCH!!!
    I CANT THANK YOU ENOUGH!!!

    I have been a nervous wreck all of today i havent been able to do anything or think about anything else. Im a medical student, hopefully oneday I will be able to help one of you guys out. I will make an appointment to see the CAB, I have an appointment with the student union advisor on monday, he says he wants to see the contract and the letter which my landlord sent to my parents home. I will keep you updated with the outcomes.

    I dont suppose that there is anyway I could get out of the contract by "fear of living in the house", or "fear of personal safety" is there?

    The other student who caused me hell was evicted from university accomodation for posession of a pellet gun, and was thrown out of a lecture for flicking an elastic band at another student...funnily enough it was MY tutor who threw him out of the lecture. Could i use any of this evidence in my favour??

    Leave a comment:

Latest Activity

Collapse

Working...
X