Tenant has drilled holes and added locks.

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  • Tenant has drilled holes and added locks.

    Me again,

    the tenant has adde a lock to the front and back door without giving me keys. By adding these locks he has put holes in the doors.
    Can I say this is criminal damage.

    Cheers.

  • #2
    You can say what you want, but providing the tenant rectifies this before vacating there is little you can do. You can't prevent a tenant changing the locks.
    The advice I give should not be construed as a definitive answer, and is without prejudice or liability. You are advised to consult a specialist solicitor or other person of equal legal standing.

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    • #3
      Try to contain your anger with this tenant, fitting new locks to the doors is hardly going to be viewed as criminal damage, at the very worst, you could make him restore the doors to their original condition, or pay for new ones. Do as we have suggested and go through the proper channels.

      While you are waiting for your Court date, may I suggest you attend a few classes in anger management.
      I offer no guarantee that anything I say is correct. wysiwyg

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jta View Post
        Try to contain your anger with this tenant, fitting new locks to the doors is hardly going to be viewed as criminal damage, at the very worst, you could make him restore the doors to their original condition, or pay for new ones. Do as we have suggested and go through the proper channels.

        While you are waiting for your Court date, may I suggest you attend a few classes in anger management.

        About the holes - presumably these are now filled with the new locks?
        Or do you mean you can see through them? That'll mean a draughty hallway then. He'll soon stop them up, if he has any sense.

        It might be a good idea to suggest to him that he leave a set of keys with a neighbour (if he is not prepared to give any to you) in case you or the emergency services have to gain entry in an emergency e.g. suspected fire or gas leak. Otherwise you'll have to break the door down and he may be liable for the cost of replacement.

        Why won't he let you have keys?
        'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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        • #5
          Originally posted by mind the gap View Post

          Why won't he let you have keys?

          Actually...having just read your other thread, I understand perfectly why he won't! I'd barricade myself in, too, if I thought someone was going to come in and appropriate all my furniture. Wouldn't you?
          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
            Actually...having just read your other thread, I understand perfectly why he won't! I'd barricade myself in, too, if I thought someone was going to come in and appropriate all my furniture. Wouldn't you?
            Surely you can see it isn't HIS furniture. It is my daughters who basically wants to move back into HER house.

            I didn't realise that most people on here seemed to sympathis with people 'sponging' off others. If I were a fat cat landlord I could probably accept lots of the sarky unhelpful comments...like telling me to take anger management classes...unfortunatley I am just a full time worker who wants to get a lowlife out of his daughters house.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by neveragain View Post
              the sarky unhelpful comments...like telling me to take anger management classes...unfortunatley
              That was not meant to be sarky, I meant it.
              Go on the way you are and you are going to be in serious trouble with the law.
              Every answer you've had on this has been meant to help you.
              If you don't want to hear the answers, why ask.
              I offer no guarantee that anything I say is correct. wysiwyg

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by neveragain View Post
                Surely you can see it isn't HIS furniture. It is my daughters who basically wants to move back into HER house.
                Yes, it's your daughter's house/furniture. Letting her house furnished allows T to use both house and furniture, of course.
                JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by neveragain View Post
                  Me again,

                  the tenant has adde a lock to the front and back door without giving me keys. By adding these locks he has put holes in the doors.
                  Can I say this is criminal damage.

                  Cheers.
                  It isn't criminal damage.
                  Best Regards

                  PI Guy

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