Tenant hoarding rubbish/junk and messing-up property

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    #16
    Originally posted by Preston View Post
    Hi

    This could well be completely wide of the mark, but in a housing context some types of "hoarding" can be a sign of mental health issues, such as obsessive compulsive behaviour. Nothing to worry about; just something to be aware of if it continues. It may be that the individuals concerned are receiving or need some professional support.


    Preston
    Hi Preston,

    Having just issued a Final, Final, Last Ultimatum to my own teenager badger re the state of his sett, I laughed long and loud (not to mention a touch hysterically) at this - I take it you don't have to share your house with teenagers?

    I think 'messy beggars' is much closer to the mark!

    Even if they did need professional help, I'm not sure the LL is the person to organise it.
    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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      #17
      Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
      Hi Preston,

      Having just issued a Final, Final, Last Ultimatum to my own teenager badger re the state of his sett, I laughed long and loud (not to mention a touch hysterically) at this - I take it you don't have to share your house with teenagers?

      I think 'messy beggars' is much closer to the mark!

      Even if they did need professional help, I'm not sure the LL is the person to organise it.
      Hi, I obviously tickled your sensitivity gene!

      Actually, I have a 17 year old and a 12 year old. I think I have more success dealing with assured shorthold obsessive compulsives.

      Anyway, on the subject at hand, anyone who has worked in property management as long as I have will, I think, recognise the potential senario I am alluding to. Its more common than you might think.

      Preston

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        #18
        Originally posted by Preston View Post
        Actually, I have a 17 year old and a 12 year old. I think I have more success dealing with assured shorthold obsessive compulsives.
        What a brilliant phrase. But at least tenants are only shorthold compulsive-obsessives. I have worked with long-hold (?) ones and they can be a worry, I agree.

        It's really hard to identify the point at which a penchant for tidiness (or forward planning) tips over into obsessive cleanliness or compulsive hoarding, isn't it? That's what I was thinking of when I made the remark about 'one person's rubbish' - who decides what is normal and what isn't? For example, my mother-in-law buys a packet of tea every time she goes to the supermarket. She has done so as long as anyone can remember, many of her cupboards are full of the stuff and she freely admits she will never drink it all. But she's happy - she knows that she will never run out of tea and she sleeps well at night in that knowledge. It's clearly not 'normal' behaviour (at least, not in my view), but if she's happy, who's to say she needs help?

        I wish some of our student tenants would be a bit more compulsive or obsessive about tidying up and cleaning, but in the end I think I would have to defend anyone's right to be untidy (except in my house!)
        'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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          #19
          I think we all have our little foibles. My mother lives in a large house by herself. She has a very large fridge from the days when up to 7 other people lived in the house with her. The fridge is always full. Consequently, so is the bin.

          I think you asked earlier whether the "stuff etc" in this case includes organic material. The first person with this disorder I ever got to know could not throw anything away including nail clippings and orange peel. She was quite tidy in the way she stored them. She just ran out of space.

          Preston

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            #20
            Originally posted by Preston View Post
            I think we all have our little foibles. My mother lives in a large house by herself. She has a very large fridge from the days when up to 7 other people lived in the house with her. The fridge is always full. Consequently, so is the bin.

            I think you asked earlier whether the "stuff etc" in this case includes organic material. The first person with this disorder I ever got to know could not throw anything away including nail clippings and orange peel. She was quite tidy in the way she stored them. She just ran out of space.

            Preston
            Pity you could not have introduced the second person you describe, to Rodent on this forum. He would have found had an economically productive use for all her clippings and orange peel, I'm sure. (If nothing else, he would've flogged it all on ebay).

            This has reminded me about a woman who lived in our street when I was growing up. She would clean her house thoroughly from top to bottom, every four hours, day and night. It took her about three hours to do it, then she'd rest/eat/shower...but within an hour she would be convinced the dirt was building up again, and start all over. Clearly, with hindsight, I'd say she needed help - but at the time, most of the other residents of the street just thought she was more than averagely houseproud, and voiced the opinion that she would be better employed coming round and cleaning other people's houses, if she liked cleaning that much.

            'A Cream Cracker Under the Settee' and 'The Outside Dog' stuff!
            'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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              #21
              As a tenant and a bit of a hoarder myself I find it a bit offensive that mathy is suggesting starting possession proceedings at this stage.

              I guess we need to know more details about the nature of this "rubbish" but I certainly dont see the justification of a LL advising a T how to live.

              I have always worked on the theory that aslong as my lifestyle does not adversely affect the fabric of my home - ie Carpets, Walls, and any furniture provided with the property then I fail to see what business the LL has poking his nose in?

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                #22
                Originally posted by Gigabyte View Post
                As a tenant and a bit of a hoarder myself I find it a bit offensive that mathy is suggesting starting possession proceedings at this stage.

                I guess we need to know more details about the nature of this "rubbish" but I certainly dont see the justification of a LL advising a T how to live.

                I have always worked on the theory that aslong as my lifestyle does not adversely affect the fabric of my home - ie Carpets, Walls, and any furniture provided with the property then I fail to see what business the LL has poking his nose in?
                Yes, all true. L can use the three grounds mentioned in my post #3 ONLY if they apply!
                JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

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