Antisocial tenants next door

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    Antisocial tenants next door

    My very decent tenants have just given me their notice because of the antisocial behaviour of the tenants next door. The next door people are a group of Lithuanian males with a history of late night partying, noise and general nuisance in the neighbourhood. In this instance, my tenants (two young working girls) have written to me that threats were made to them and now they are really scared.

    I am going to talk to my tenants this afternoon to find out more but they are going to leave. Is there anything I can do to stop this from happening again? I have already complained to the landlord of next door (as I have done before on many other occasions), and I intend to invoice him on the lost rent and letting agents fees to find a new tenant. Is he obliged to pay? Should I instead go to a solicitor/council straightaway?

    I suspect that my tenants would be unwilling to put up with any more hassles, e.g. getting involved with police/lawyers etc.

    The landlord of next door has proven in the past to be unwilling to evict his tenants because they are good tenants as fars as he is concerned.

    #2
    Your tenants should be taking the route of any other householder who suffers a nuisance from neighbors, they should complain to the EH. I don't think you have a chance of getting anything out of the other LL, why should he pay you? What may be unacceptable to a couple of young girls may be perfectly ok for other tenants, are there any laws being broken? Step back and look at it from the other side if you can.
    I offer no guarantee that anything I say is correct. wysiwyg

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      #3
      Originally posted by jta View Post
      Your tenants should be taking the route of any other householder who suffers a nuisance from neighbors, they should complain to the EH.
      Or not. Why should this be the tenants' problem?

      You could try putting a layer of sound insulation onto the party wall; a quick Google suggests you could buy insulating material for ~£500 per wall (http://www.soundservice.co.uk/), but obviously you'd lose rent whilst the work is done, and it wouldn't solve the antisocial behaviour.

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        #4
        This is a bit of a long shot, but if the next door property is a licensable HMO, the landlord may be under some obligation (under the conditions of his HMO licence) to enforce an antisocial behaviour policy, in other words, to deal with the anti-social behaviour of his tenants.

        You can find out if the property is (or should be) a licensed HMO by asking your council's housing dept.

        Incidentally, is the next-door tenants' nationality in any way relevant?
        'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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          #5
          The house is most definitely not a registered HMO (it's a small 3 bed terrace) although at any point in time there are 3 to 5 people staying in the house.

          I could complain to the council that the next door LL is breaking the law. That's a very good pointer. Thanks.

          Unfortunately the nationality (or more importantly, the culture) becomes important in cases like these in my experience. Incidentally, I am of Indian descent and my tenants are English. I have had a lot of problem myself with the next door people...

          Comment


            #6
            If the tenants are unrelated then they would be classed as more than one household sharing (or lacking) facilities, thus it would be an HMO by definition. Whether it needs a licence will depend on a number of factors, but councils have the power to require LLs to apply for licences based on local criteria which go beyond the national ones.

            It would be worth asking.
            'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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              #7
              Hi

              Do your deeds include a covenant against anti-social behaviour? Some do, some don't, but if yours does, its likely that your neighour's does too.

              Preston

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Preston View Post
                Hi

                Do your deeds include a covenant against anti-social behaviour? Some do, some don't, but if yours does, its likely that your neighour's does too.

                Preston

                And then begins the process of deciding exactly what "anti-social behavior is" !!!

                The Rodent
                A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.
                W.Churchill

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Rodent1 View Post
                  And then begins the process of deciding exactly what "anti-social behavior is" !!!

                  The Rodent
                  Actions which can make your neighbours' lives a misery:
                  • Noise (of any kind) loud enough to be heard through the walls, especially at night. This can include anything from arguing to playing music
                  • Making noise or smells which disturb others' quiet enjoyment of their home/garden
                  • Trespassing on, or damaging others' property.
                  • Leaving/burning rubbish/unwanted items in the street or on others' property
                  • Behaving in such a way as to attract or encourage other people who do any of the above, into the area

                  Not sure about leaving rubbish in their own gardens - although some kinds of rubbish attract vermin, which an EHO would say was unacceptable.
                  'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                  Comment

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