Carpets ruined by cleaning Company

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    Carpets ruined by cleaning Company

    We finally got rid of our problem tenant & paid to have the carpets professionally cleaned before new tenants moved in.
    One week later the carpets are still wet and beginning to rot. We have had to remove then from the 2 bedrooms as the damp was causing the wallpaper to start peeling off.
    I had another carpet cleaning company come in today to see it they could do a "repair" job but they advised the carpets are ruined and that even if they were taken up and the underlay replaced & the carpets reckoned the smell would be back in a week or so & that really they were a write off.

    I contacted the originally carpet cleaning company who said they couldn't understood it as the carpets were practically dry when they left (however 2 days later of you knelt on them you had wet patches on your Knees). They have also refused to come and ever look at then before receiving a written report fr0m the other carpet cleaning company,

    I an concerned that in their present state (it smells like there are 200 pairs of smelly trainers in the room)it constitutes a health hazard to the new tenants especially as their son is asthmatic.

    My gut reaction is to take the carpets up immediately and get the replaced the then pursue the cleaning company.

    At the time of cleaning the property was empty so windows were not left open but we were not advised to do so.

    Any suggestions on how to progress would be gratefully appreciated.

    #2
    How much are the carpets worth? If it wouldn't be worth suing company1, even in Small Claims Court, forget it.
    JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
    1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
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      #3
      Contact " consumer direct" by phone for advice. They don't do commercial help ( you are a LL business), but they could advise you as if it were your own carpets in your own home.

      You could also contact trading standards.
      All posts in good faith, but do not rely on them

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        #4
        Carpet is 2 years old, was bought by a previous tenant after they burnt the one there (insurance claim) but I have no receipt.

        Living Room is very large + 2 bedrooms, will cost quite a bit to replace even if done as cheaply as possible.

        Consumer Direct v. helpful. Have advised company is being unreasonable in not coming to look and we are justified in removing carpets to prevent further damage.

        Thanks for your help.

        Comment


          #5
          I should think you should make an insurance claim.

          Comment


            #6
            I had carpets cleaned in the summer and even leaving windows open it took a good couple of days for them to be totally dry all over so I can imagine with it being much colder now and in a house with no ventilation / heating it would be a real problem.

            The person who cleaned my carpets was adamant that they would be totally dry within a few hours(!) so I think these companies either don't understand how long they take to dry or are being a little economical with the truth...

            Comment


              #7
              I think if the literature made claims such as "dry in 12 hours" you would have a strong case through small claims for replacement (less wear and tear of course). It all depends on what you were led to believe you were paying for. Trading standards will also advise.
              Unshackled by the chains of idle vanity, A modest manatee, that's me

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                #8
                Originally posted by islandgirl View Post
                I think if the literature made claims such as "dry in 12 hours" you would have a strong case through small claims for replacement (less wear and tear of course). It all depends on what you were led to believe you were paying for. Trading standards will also advise.
                I agree that this would be the best way to go. I cannot see the insurers being interested since they would argue it was preventable/caused by negligence. I expect they will tell you to sue the carpet cleaners.

                They sound like a bunch of cowboys. I am not a 'professional' carpet cleaner, but I have hired the same machines they use, and if they are operated according to instructions, the carepts are dry within 12 hours, even in winter. The machines come with guidance as to ventilating/heating the room immediately afterwards - it's not brain surgery. You just have to follow the instructions, so you don't flood the carpet with water in the first place, then you apply a bit of elbow grease to ensure all the dirty water is sucked back out of the carpet after cleaning. Sounds very much as if they didn't know how to operate the thing, or that it was leaking and they didn't have the sense to realise it.
                'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                  I cannot see the insurers being interested since they would argue it was preventable/caused by negligence. I expect they will tell you to sue the carpet cleaners.

                  .
                  Negligence is one of the very things that insurance insures against, in much the same way as when a negligent driver crashes into your car. Your insurance (if fully comp) pays you and your insurers then, by way of their right of subrogation, sue the negligent driver or their insurance company for the money they have paid you.

                  As for whether or not OP's carpet cleaners were in breach of contract and/or negligent, that would depend on, amongst other things, whether it is accepted practice to leave carpets so wet, whether there was some other reason the carpet has begun to disintegrate, whether the cleaners should have taken some other action to dry the carpets and whether they should have advised OP to turn on heating/leave windows open to assist in the drying process.

                  These are all questions of fact, which are better answered by an expert in that field.

                  If OP brings proceedings on the small claims track, then expert evidence (in the sense of a proper, expensive report which complies with CPR pt 35) is not usually allowed, but the court will usually want to see some sort of supporting evidence, eg: a letter from Joe Bloggs Carpet Cleaning Ltd which backs up their case.
                  Health Warning


                  I try my best to be accurate, but please bear in mind that some posts are written in a matter of seconds and often cannot be edited later on.

                  All information contained in my posts is given without any assumption of responsibility on my part. This means that if you rely on my advice but it turns out to be wrong and you suffer losses (of any kind) as a result, then you cannot sue me.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Guys calm down .........!

                    If this is a quality carpet ie high wool content then when wet it will smell horrendous .....th worst case i have had with this is in my own home ...i have a professional carpet cleaning machine which cost me nearly £1000 .....does it clean well ?..yes very well! i used my old one onmy carpet at home ..followed immediately by the new one to see just how much more it would get out of it ...ans loads ???

                    Suction power on new model is considererably greater then on old.........but cleans a LOT deeper so takes longer to dry ................

                    The smell of wet wool is "bad" ...smelly trainers ...NOPE my lounge smelt more like a dog had the squits in there !!!! ......I was extremely unhappy with this as was the rest of the family ...so i called the supplier of the machine as clearly this was a fault with the shampoo or the machine ????

                    Nope ...its the wool ......it takes a week or so to dry properly depending on weather ...and all will be fine ....!

                    This has happened a few times now (my son is autistic and like to make "patterns" on the carpet with the contents of his nappies!!!....hey ...you gotta laugh !!!!) so carpet get shampooed quite often !

                    But within a few days the smell dissappears and all is well !

                    Trust me !

                    this only happens on wool carpets i find ...i have 100 rooms let out and the better quality the carpet the worse the smell

                    To speed the drying process we use a bouncy castle air fan which dries it within a few hours !!!!

                    The Rodent
                    A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.
                    W.Churchill

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I am calm!

                      I think Roden't right about 100% wool carpets taking longer, however, OP's carpets were still wet and starting to rot after a week and we don't even know they were wool.

                      I still maintain the machine has probably been used incorrectly or has been faulty and I think the likelihood of the carpets drying out or ever smelling normal again is remote, however many Gale Force 9 industrial dryers you instal.

                      OP, we once had to chuck out a carpet ruined by a radiator which leaked for two weeks (in our absence); it smelled evil and we too were worried about the health of our baby. We rang the insurers the day we discovered it and they said, remove it, store it in outhouse/garage if possible for inspection then it can be disposed of. They came out within a day or two to verify the claim and then we could get rid. What you're supposed to do if you don't have a garage, I don't know.

                      Good luck with your claim.
                      'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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