Why would DSS want Council House?

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    Why would DSS want Council House?

    [edit] The subject lines should say: Why would DSS tenant want Council House?


    I am confused, my father has a DSS tenant who is renting a 2 bed in good condition. She has been renting for several years, however over the past 2-3 years her attitude has changed e.g. rude, harsh.... my father believes she is doing this delibratly as she wants a Council House. And lots of petty complaints....

    Recently she asked my father to evict her! But my father refused, as it would cost £1000 in costs e.g. court, baillifs before the council will re-house her. My father said he could, if she paid these costs!.

    So my question is, if she has a nice flat, why does she want to get evicted? She might end up in a high-rise council flat? Or do they get all those fancy new homes!

    (I know some DSS tenants trash a property on purpose to get evicted!).

    #2
    Originally posted by rajeshk4u View Post
    [edit] The subject lines should say: Why would DSS tenant want Council House?


    I am confused, my father has a DSS tenant who is renting a 2 bed in good condition. She has been renting for several years, however over the past 2-3 years her attitude has changed e.g. rude, harsh.... my father believes she is doing this delibratly as she wants a Council House. And lots of petty complaints....

    Recently she asked my father to evict her! But my father refused, as it would cost £1000 in costs e.g. court, baillifs before the council will re-house her. My father said he could, if she paid these costs!.

    So my question is, if she has a nice flat, why does she want to get evicted? She might end up in a high-rise council flat? Or do they get all those fancy new homes!

    (I know some DSS tenants trash a property on purpose to get evicted!).
    Has he tried asking her why?
    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by rajeshk4u View Post
      [edit] The subject lines should say: Why would DSS tenant want Council House?


      I am confused, my father has a DSS tenant who is renting a 2 bed in good condition. She has been renting for several years, however over the past 2-3 years her attitude has changed e.g. rude, harsh.... my father believes she is doing this delibratly as she wants a Council House. And lots of petty complaints....

      Recently she asked my father to evict her! But my father refused, as it would cost £1000 in costs e.g. court, baillifs before the council will re-house her. My father said he could, if she paid these costs!.

      So my question is, if she has a nice flat, why does she want to get evicted? She might end up in a high-rise council flat? Or do they get all those fancy new homes!

      (I know some DSS tenants trash a property on purpose to get evicted!).
      HI there, most people want a council house as they are more secure for the future as the council rarely evict a tenant, also the rent , if the tenant is working tends to be a lot cheaper than the private sector.

      Some areas still give generous discounts to buy the property to council tenants after a period of living in the property so if she is looking to the future this may be the only way she can see to get on the property ladder.

      I dont know where you live but in the London area all she would end up with is a hostel for a while and then a high rise, if shes lucky, and these are no joke.
      my answers are for entertainment only, I accept no resposibility for anyone elses actions.
      Regards Karatepaul

      Comment


        #4
        If you evict a tenant using the accelerated possesion procedure and Section 21 then the council will class the tenant as homeless and have a duty to rehouse regardless of why they were evicted. This is often used as it is convinient for landlords and a possession order is guaranteed.

        If you evict a tenant using Section 8 using grounds 8 and 10 onwards (except 16) for not payiing rent or being naughty then the council will class the tenant as intentionally homeless and not have a duty to rehouse, so the tenant will go on the waiting list the same as every one else. The council will assist them in finding somewhere to live. This process relies on the opinion of a judge to grant the possession order, except for grond 8 which is a mandatorty ground.

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          #5
          I am not sure it is right to say the council has a "duty to rehouse" if a tenant is evicted as a result of a section 21. A single person with no dependants who is not classed as "vunerable" stands little chance of re-housing. Even hostel places may be difficult to obtain.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by rajeshk4u View Post
            [edit] The subject lines should say: Why would DSS tenant want Council House?


            .
            I know it is difficult to believe, but some people actually want to live in a property which has an affordable rent. It is then worth their while getting a job rather than having rely on benefits to fund an cripplingly high rent (in terms of the proportion of the tenant's income spent on rent). Otherwise known as escaping the "poverty trap".

            Using London as an example:

            2 bed flat (private) - £270pw

            2 bed flat (council or housing association) - £90pw

            Unfortunately this plan often comes a cropper because the local authority frequently discharge their duty to house vulnerable homeless persons by sourcing property on the private rental market (often, ironically at higher than market rent). The tenant does manage to get themselves more housing points by being in temp accomodation, but it doesn't solve the immediate "affordability" problem.
            Health Warning


            I try my best to be accurate, but please bear in mind that some posts are written in a matter of seconds and often cannot be edited later on.

            All information contained in my posts is given without any assumption of responsibility on my part. This means that if you rely on my advice but it turns out to be wrong and you suffer losses (of any kind) as a result, then you cannot sue me.

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