Can I sue my landlord for lack of fire alarms?

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    #31
    rodent, having just read the thread I was just about to put the same post,

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      #32
      Originally posted by Rodent1 View Post
      1.Use HEAT NOT SMOKE detectors in Kitchens
      2.Use mains interlinked (with 10 yr) battery back up ---no battery running down so no need for T to EVER mess with
      3.Cheaper in long term as No batt replacement for 10 Yrs


      Guys , just how hard do you want to make this ?!


      The Rodent
      The kitchen detector was a heat detector, but because T chocked door open, smoke from burning sausages triggered hall smoke detector. By 'beeping' in his case, I was referring to our language, not to noise of batteries running down.

      The system you describe is the one prescribed for HMOs, and we have it. But if tenants inisist on burning food with door to hall open and fan not on, they will keep setting alarms off and I'd be interested to hear any realistic proposals for how to re-educate such Ts. We have tried!
      'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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        #33
        Originally posted by Rodent1 View Post
        1.Use HEAT NOT SMOKE detectors in Kitchens
        Guys , just how hard do you want to make this ?!
        Didn't want to mention heat detectors, as then dicusions about" But they say "smoke" detectors must be fitted, will ensue. ( We know they detect the smoke emitted from burning or semi burning materials ) ( Toast ) Or "My landlord has never heard of heat detectors, if it waits for the heat instead of smoke, wont it give you less warning"

        So folks....... make your choice, but read any regulations / advice on giving advanced warning to tenants of impending fire by fitting those white round things with or without batteries in them.

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          #34
          There are i think 7 different ways of detecting a potential fire , smoke density, ionisation, otpical properties of "air",temperature rise etc
          Different detectors work on different sensors, BUT HEAT (temperature rise detector)not Smoke detectors in kitchens are very much the norm to anyone other than a diy amateur.

          As for battery operated ...forget it ...for all the reasons described ....not least the cost of changing batts at £3-£5 a pop ......
          Bite the bullet once and put mains interlinked 10 yr rechargeable batt back up in and sleep easy .....and let your T do the same ....AND SAVE MONEY in the long term

          The Rodent
          A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.
          W.Churchill

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            #35
            I have just recieved the following from a fireman:

            Generally if the property is let as a unit housing one family there is no requirement for a fire alarm to be fitted; if however it is divided up and there are multiple occupiers it would be an HMO if more than four occupiers and would be subject to the local authority regulations which would include a fire alarm.

            For less than four there is still a recommendation to fit an alarm system. This generally consists of smoke detection in the common areas and heat detection in the kitchen.

            If there are repeated nuisance alarms it may be that there is a smoke detector in the kitchen (not recommended) or the kitchen door is kept open and smoke drifts into the hall setting off the smoke detector in that location.

            You can get more intelligent detectors which are less prone to false alarms, but generally toasters are a nuisance in these circumstances. It also depends on the size of the accommodation as alarms will be more prevalent in cramped circumstances.

            General advice is:

            · only heat detection in kitchen (will only activate in a fire)

            · smoke detector in hall sited where not subject to nuisance alarms (not right outside kitchen door)

            · kitchen door should be a fire door and should be kept shut (especially when cooking)

            · repeated unwanted alarm activations lead to complacency and a lack of response during a real alarm

            If you really want to get into the subject go to http://www.yorkrla.co.uk/files/Natio...20Jul%2008.pdf

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