Can solicitors charge for doing nothing?

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    #16
    Just wanted to write and say this thread is brilliant. It has really cheered me up.

    My view would be that the solicitor should be able to charge but following from what Jeffrey has said, the solicitor would not be able to enforce it. I'm sure I have read that Solicitors must give costs information in writing. If they don't then they are not able to charge and in fact a complaint can be made to the SRA. Who'd be a solicitor !!!!!!!!!

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      #17
      Originally posted by agent46 View Post
      Did it go out on their letterhead?
      No. They were supposed to write it (to explain something to the vendor of our new house), but they never got round to it. It was holding the whole process up, so I advised them I would write it myself, and they said OK. It went out on a rather fetching leaf of Basidon Bond.
      'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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        #18
        Originally posted by htrj View Post
        The solicitor asked to view the rental agreement, and then declared that ... the chances of getting the tenants removed was 50 50 at the very best. I've decided not to go through eviction proceedings.
        So your solicitor advised you that you would be wasting your money on taking up any more of his time. I think you should pay and thank him for being so honest. If he'd said that it was 90% chance of success, you'd have continued, wouldn't you?

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          #19
          Originally posted by SALL View Post
          But the solicitor didn't actually provided a service, it sounds more like a quote to me.
          Yes he did - he read an agreement and advised on it.

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            #20
            Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
            Answered your own question: "..where a client rings his solicitor..."
            Sorry I am not following that.

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              #21
              Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
              Sorry I am not following that.
              I think Jeffrey is suggesting that OP is not a client of the solicitor as there is no engagement letter.

              I'm not sure we can be certain of this from OP's post - he may be (although I agree it appears unlikely) OP's solicitor with a long-standing relationship - although no separate engagement in respect of this piece of advice. He may equally be a solicitor plucked from the phonebook or the internet at random. He may even be Jeffrey who offers advice at £2 per minute, apparently, over the telephone... how does that sit with the DSRs?

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                #22
                Originally posted by Telometer View Post
                I think Jeffrey is suggesting that OP is not a client of the solicitor as there is no engagement letter.

                I'm not sure we can be certain of this from OP's post - he may be (although I agree it appears unlikely) OP's solicitor with a long-standing relationship - although no separate engagement in respect of this piece of advice. He may equally be a solicitor plucked from the phonebook or the internet at random. He may even be Jeffrey who offers advice at £2 per minute, apparently, over the telephone... how does that sit with the DSRs?
                As to first paragraph, yes.
                As to last sentence, telephone service is offered to LZ members and the general public (not to those who are already accredited as clients).
                JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

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