Should T pay for damage to bath

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    Should T pay for damage to bath

    Bath has been in situ for over 20 year. T has reported leaking around the edges of a previous occasion and the (then) plumber fixed it by putting sealand around the edges. With time the sealant curle dup at the edges and the bath again began to leak. T attempted to fix it themselves by applying foam and now the plumber says it (bath will need to be replaced and is quoting £995 to new bath, bath panel etc and new taps. The agent says that the T should make a "substantial contribution" to the work. They are pointing out that the bath is 20 years old and that previous work has not been successful.

    Should I ask T to pay for any of the damage and if so what would be reasonable?

    #2
    Asking the tenant to chip in towards the cost of a tube of sealant would certainly be reasonable. B&Q are selling it for £5.38.
    I would suggest reapplying sealant around the edge of a bath is a job that a long-term tenant ought to learn how to do themselves.

    Asking the tenant to contribute anything towards the cost of replacing a 20-year old bath, however, would be ridiculous!

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      #3
      The agent is saying that because the T applied the wrong kind of sealand themselves the bath is "ruined." They need to replace bath, taps, reclad and panels. £995 is their estimate.

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        #4
        Have you considered changing agents?

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          #5
          It is the plumber who is saying that the bath is ruined. I dont see why they cannot remove the "wrong kind of sealant" and apply the right kind.

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            #6
            The bathroom has not been updated in any way decorwise during the entire tenancy of the T

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              #7
              After 20 years it's quite likely that the bath has reached the end of its life anyway, isn't it? The enamel loses its shine.

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                #8
                Its a plastic bath. Also the bathroom would have to be replaced/refurbished in order to relet of sell the house.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by casual_reader View Post
                  I would suggest reapplying sealant around the edge of a bath is a job that a long-term tenant ought to learn how to do themselves.!
                  I would never want a tenant to apply sealant themselves. It is just a critical piece. I would rather it get done professionally. A small leak can end up causing a leak to the flat / room below.

                  Why did the tenant apply foam? It is the wrong material.

                  if he removed the old seal and then put in foam, then there is some blame. You need to tel lyour tenant not to carry out any repairs.

                  Scrapping off foam is a pain, but doable. I don't see why they he wants a new taps etc...

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                    #10
                    The agent doesn't know what they're talking about.

                    Assuming the tenant has done something that has destroyed the bath completely.
                    They've damaged a 20 year old bath.
                    What you can claim from them is the value of the 20 year old bath (plus possibly the cost of removing it, but I'd dispute that if I were the tenant).

                    You need to replace the bath (because you have to), but you can't charge the tenant for that.

                    After 20 years, it's possible that the bathroom needs to be looked at completely.
                    When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                    Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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                      #11
                      The T applied the foam over the old seal which had already become faulty. It had curled up at the edges and black mould had got in underneath. So it was already unsightly.

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                        #12
                        T says that she had pointed out the unsightly state of the sealand and the mould at a previous inspection but nothing was ever done about it.

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                          #13
                          What caused the damage is academic, really.
                          The most you can recover from the tenant is the value of what they've damaged.
                          And you are obliged to replace the bath (although you could, I suppose, "replace" it with a shower).
                          When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                          Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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                            #14
                            If you're able to visit the premises or send someone indpendent for a second opinion then I would do that.

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                              #15
                              tenant shouldn't have to pay anything and i find it funny how anyone could think a tenant should have to pay towards a bathroom renovation.
                              its also your job to maintain the property and that includes resealing the bath and sinks etc when required. if its going black prematurely, tenant should be reminded to wipe it after use and have window open for 30min or something.

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