Tenancy Agreement Contract Template

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    Tenancy Agreement Contract Template

    Hi,

    I am a new landlord since last year. The first tenancy was arranged through a letting agent but it is coming to an end. I am looking to renew it. With regards to the Assured Shorthold Tenancy Contract, is there a particular template which is generally considered to be best from a landlords perspective/popular amongst landlords? Any other tips or things to look out for when renewing a tenancy would be greatly appreciated.

    Many thanks in advance,
    Auzz.

    #2
    There's no need to renew it.
    The tenant doesn't have to sign a new agreement (particularly one that's different to the previous one).
    When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
    Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

    Comment


      #3
      Do you have ALL paperwork from agent that would permit a valid s21 please? If not get that first...
      I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
        There's no need to renew it.
        The tenant doesn't have to sign a new agreement (particularly one that's different to the previous one).
        Thanks for the reply. The existing contract doesn't say anything about a periodic tenancy, and the tenant wants security of a longer tenancy. I imagine a new contract would be required in this situation?

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by theartfullodger View Post
          Do you have ALL paperwork from agent that would permit a valid s21 please? If not get that first...
          Thanks, I will check.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by auzz View Post
            Thanks for the reply. The existing contract doesn't say anything about a periodic tenancy, and the tenant wants security of a longer tenancy. I imagine a new contract would be required in this situation?
            If the existing contract doesn't say what happens when the agreement ends, a new periodic contract is created by the 1988 Housing Act, with exactly the same terms and conditions, other than anything related to notice which is replaced by standard terms for you and the tenant.

            The tenant's desire for security should be balanced with your own requirements.
            Any security for the tenant comes at the cost of flexibility to you.

            If you would have no reason to ask the tenant to leave unless something goes wrong, why increase your risks for no reason?
            I have no tenants on anything other than periodic tenancies, their original six-month initial terms having expired (in most cases) several years ago.

            When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
            Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by auzz View Post

              Thanks, I will check.
              Google "nearly legal section 21" for a checklist
              I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

              Comment


                #8
                Sorry, didn't answer your question.
                The National Landlord Association offers such documents to its members, and they're, therefore, in widespread use and people seem happy with them.
                The government offers a very comprehensive agreement template (https://www.gov.uk/government/public...ssured-tenancy), which looks very decent.
                When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
                  If the existing contract doesn't say what happens when the agreement ends, a new periodic contract is created by the 1988 Housing Act, with exactly the same terms and conditions, other than anything related to notice which is replaced by standard terms for you and the tenant.

                  The tenant's desire for security should be balanced with your own requirements.
                  Any security for the tenant comes at the cost of flexibility to you.

                  If you would have no reason to ask the tenant to leave unless something goes wrong, why increase your risks for no reason?
                  I have no tenants on anything other than periodic tenancies, their original six-month initial terms having expired (in most cases) several years ago.
                  Thanks, it seems like a statutory periodic tenancy may be the way to go. Just wondering what happens regarding rent increase; if you let a statutory periodic tenancy run in this way, there would be no legally binding contract regarding the new rent?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by auzz View Post
                    Just wondering what happens regarding rent increase; if you let a statutory periodic tenancy run in this way, there would be no legally binding contract regarding the new rent?
                    Contracts don't have to be massively formal.

                    You and the tenant can agree a new rent and that's an agreement.
                    And when the tenant starts paying it, that's evidence of that agreement.

                    And, if you and the tenant can't agree, in a periodic contract created by law, you can impose a new rent once a year by serving a formal notice.
                    The tenant can appeal to a tribunal if the rent is unfair, but, otherwise, that's it.

                    Best to agree a new rent between you though.
                    When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                    Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I'm assuming your no longer going to use the service of the agent, you should notify your T's that they need to make payment to you directly rather than the agent, you will also need them to transfer the deposit into your account which they are holding.

                      Comment

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