Advice for tenant asked for big rent rise

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  • DPT57
    replied
    Originally posted by ash72 View Post
    First of all you don't need to sign any renewal tenancy if you don't want it, the original tenancy will go periodic and the terms will be carried over each month automatically.
    That's not a real choice when the agent offers a new contract or a s21 notice.

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  • mokka
    replied
    I personally gave a landlord a Royal Mail PO Box for any further correspondence wanting to keep my new house purchase address private. I personally wouldn’t like tenants knowing my home address from a landlord perspective.

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  • boletus
    replied
    Originally posted by theartfullodger View Post
    Spend £3 with gov.uk land registry and get deeds which will get owner name and address then communicate directly
    Hmm..

    https://www.landlordzone.co.uk/news/...aign-by-acorn/

    A landlord who won £100,000 in damages from tenants’ union ACORN has spoken of her fear

    “The tenant said she didn’t want to move in after paying a £300 deposit in early December 2020, so I explained that the signed tenancy was legally binding,” Rafique tells LandlordZONE, adding that the Deposit Protection Service had ruled in her favour.


    However, two days later, 40 people turned up outside Rafique’s house, banging on her door, including the tenant, who demanded her money back while someone else filmed the confrontation.

    “They talked to my neighbours and posted cards through their doors calling me a rogue landlord and also contacted some of my tenants,”


    Leave a comment:


  • ash72
    replied
    Are we missing the point here, by passing the legally binding tenancy agreement which stipulates how and where notices, issues etc are meant to be sent to and addressed to, should be enough (otherwise what is the point of it all). If the LL instructs an agent to deal with a T, then that's who the T should go to, if a LL doesn't have a agent, and self manages it, then the tenancy agreement would have the LL's an address on it.

    If a person (regardless if it's a prospective T or a T) wants to know who owns a property that's another matter, I know a number of corporate bodies who rent out properties and if you look on land registry it has a corporation name and has an overseas address, what help is this to a T who wants to discuss a rent reduction or increase? I know not all LL's have overseas addresses, hence why the tenancy agreement should contain the information which a T needs, nothing more and nothing less.

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  • jpkeates
    replied
    Originally posted by theartfullodger View Post
    Can't agree more: Such information (landlord, address..) should be available for free, 24/7, not requiring £3 spend.
    My tenants get a nice letter with my name and contact details on it, but I want them to talk to my agent, not me.
    I try and make it clear that the details are really only if they have a problem with the agent and need to talk to me.

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  • theartfullodger
    replied
    Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
    I can't tell you how hacked off I would be if one of my tenants did that.

    The agreement has a price variation clause in it, the landlord and tenant have both agreed to it,
    Can't agree more: Such information (landlord, address..) should be available for free, 24/7, not requiring £3 spend.

    As in Scotland from the landlord register (I've had prospective tenants telling me they'd checked me out before viewing .. fair enough.)

    But in England such publicly available information is just that: Publicly available from land registry.

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  • jpucng62
    replied
    If the property is now in good condition then you might suggest there should have been a £100 pcm rent rise for the first year - when you got a reduction - and a further £100 pcm this year, so £1700. If market rate is around £1800 then I would think this reasonable.

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  • ash72
    replied
    If I was an agent, regardless of the RPI, the first thing I would do is check your income that you were on when you applied for the property, assuming there was no promotions or increase in salary, I would then see if you could afford the new rent, this is a simple affordability check, it would be irresponsible to provide a property which the T couldn't not service long term.

    Leave a comment:


  • ash72
    replied
    First of all you don't need to sign any renewal tenancy if you don't want it, the original tenancy will go periodic and the terms will be carried over each month automatically.

    I would look at the area, of similar properties currently in the market, if they are above or below your new rent. If they are below, then consider moving (but remember there are other factors to consider, the location, the condition of the property, the responsiveness of the LL to repairs etc). If they are above your new rent, then you need to consider if you can afford to live and still have a quality of life, it's important, and not to get into debt, you may need to downsize to a more financial affordable property, if that means a property with 1 less bedroom or going into shared accommodation. Reality is that the cost of living is rising, and people need to adjust their life accordingly, from heating the whole house to heating just one room.

    Leave a comment:


  • DPT57
    replied
    I suspect the talk of RPI is redundant and what the agent is saying is that if the tenant doesn't sign a new agreement at an agreed higher rent, they will be served a s21 notice.

    Sorry Renterthedragon, but rents have gone up everywhere and you and many other tenants have been caught by it. I suggest you decide what you can afford and offer it. If they say no then you will have to look for something cheaper. Remember that with demand so high and supply so low, your reputation as a tenant is important.

    Leave a comment:


  • DoricPixie
    replied
    According to the ONS the RPI for the past 12 months is a 13.1% so at £1300 that would mean an increase of almost back to where you were for the first fixed term, and at £1500 that would take you to just shy of £1700pcm. Is a rent of between £1500pcm and £1700pcm affordable for you?

    Has the landlord/letting agency got any idea what figure they'd be using for RPI?

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  • jpkeates
    replied
    RPI is about 7.5% for last year (you'd need to find a source you and the landlord agree on).
    It depends on how the rent was reduced whether the start point is £1500 or £1300 pcm.

    If it's £1500, the new rent is going to be around £1612.50 pcm.
    Which is what I'd offer if that's the start point.

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  • Renterthedragon
    replied
    Thanks all for the advice and suggestions.

    A few people said it would be helpful to get an idea of the prices involved, and I can provide these:

    - First annual tenancy: £1500 pcm
    - Second annual tenancy: £1300 pcm
    - For the third year, the agent says the landlord is trying to get as close as possible to £1800 ppm

    Thanks again - this forum is a really helpful place.

    Leave a comment:


  • DoricPixie
    replied
    You don't need to get the details from the Land Registry. The tenant can request, in writing, the letting agency to supply the landlord's contact details citing the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985. I'm not sure how wise that would be if it could potentially hack off the landlord although I do wonder how much some landlords know about what their letting agencies get up to on their behalf.

    Renterthedragon the Section 21 notice does not give you 2 months to vacate. The notice is how long the landlord has to wait before taking the matter to court, not when you have to leave. Note that it is the landlord who has to take you to court, not the letting agency.

    If you could give us some real figures to work with that would be helpful. I think jpkeates advice of proposing an increase in line with the clause in your existing tenancy agreement and then letting the tenancy become periodic is sound because that's the increase the landlord has already agreed to use.

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  • jpkeates
    replied
    Originally posted by theartfullodger View Post
    Spend £3 with gov.uk land registry and get deeds which will get owner name and address then communicate directly
    I can't tell you how hacked off I would be if one of my tenants did that.

    The agreement has a price variation clause in it, the landlord and tenant have both agreed to it,

    Leave a comment:

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