No fault eviction ending

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    No fault eviction ending

    Hi

    I have been reading about the government ending 'no fault eviction' with a section 21 notice.

    I have three semi-detached houses with long term tenants that don't give me any issues.

    I have always intended to sell the houses when I am in my mid-sixties one by one.

    If and when this ruling is introduced in the future, does anyone know how this will work when you need to evict a tenant and sell the house.

    #2
    I had heard that within the new legislation there will be a clause for if the LL wishes to sell..... logically there has to be.

    Comment


      #3
      It's likely to follow the Scottish model, so it's worth having a look at how the rules work there.
      When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
      Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

      Comment


        #4
        The idea is to remove S21 and change S8. As stated above, when Scotland removed S21 a valid reason for eviction was wanted to sell the property, so the assumption is that something similar will be in the English legislation.

        Another option is to sell with tenants in situ. This has become more common in recent years and will probably continue as the whole point of this new bill is to give tenants more protection.

        The bill has been delayed again and with all the shenanigans in Westminster at the moment who knows when it will be passed. Plus Michael Gove seems more interested in sorting the cladding issue that pushing this bill at present.

        Until the bill is passed there is no way of knowing exactly what the wording will be.

        Comment


          #5
          jpucng62 Scotland never had Section 21s because Scotland never had AST. Scots law has always been completely separate from English law. The closest equivalent to AST was the Short Assured Tenancy where you could use a Section 33 as a no-fault notice.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by jpucng62 View Post
            Another option is to sell with tenants in situ. This has become more common in recent years and will probably continue as the whole point of this new bill is to give tenants more protection..
            Agree, but a possible 'fly in the ointment ' could be the EPC of C, If this comes in as is planned then which LL will take on a property with a D or worse rating and a tenant in situ. The unknown capital expenditure would put a real barrier in the way of any sale.

            I see my properties being sold to FTB's and not LL's as they are an E and a D, not able to be made a C under the current calculations without stupid amounts of money being spent (no thank you).

            As long as all this nonsense gets pushed back enough for me to get nearer the age i had planned for ' kicking back ', then all is good.



            Comment


              #7
              As a Scottish & English landlord I'm happy with the Scottish PRT agreement, but possibly I'm a special case (old, retired it helps).

              For England we will have to wait and see final passed and signed into law by HRH before knowing if landlords will be happy. Until then any comments are just guesses, like my bets with Ladbrokes, outcome unknown.
              I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

              Comment

              Latest Activity

              Collapse

              Working...
              X