Deposit taken for mould - help

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    #16
    Mould invariably due to life style.

    Mould is invariably due to lifestyle. I had a tenant in a bungalow of mine who swore black & blue there was a damp problem due to the building. Mould kept growing on the walls. When he moved out there has been was no more mould with new tenant in last two years. If people are going to dry clothes in a flat without windows wide open they are asking for trouble. Best not to dry clothes in the flat at all. Get a condenser washer dryer or use washing line outside or go to launderette. Also follow other guidelines below. One other tip is to switch to economy 10 instead of economy 7. This gives 10 hours of low tariff electricity including a boost in the afternoon & evening so as to get more even heat through out the day in 'all electric' flats.
    I put the following in my tenancy agreements due to problems in other flats with mould:

    Problems caused by mildew
    Mildew is a common problem in the form of black patches that grow on walls and shower curtains and around window frames. It is also inclined to grow in areas of poor air circulation due to furniture placed close to walls. Mildew can ruin paintwork & curtains. It forms when there is a high moisture content in air which then condenses on cold surfaces such as the inside surfaces of outside walls. Moisture in the air comes from a number of sources. In for example a 2 person household there is about 4litres of water put into the air every day (without taking into account any heating) i.e. Breathing (asleep) 0.12 kg, Breathing (awake) 0.35 kg, Cooking 1.2 kg, Personal washing 0.4 kg, Washing a drying clothes 2 kg
    Ways to avoid mildew
    1) Regularly air the flat by leaving windows open even just a small amount. This is essential to permit moisture to escape.
    2) Open the bathroom window and close the bathroom door during and after showering or bathing.
    3) Open the kitchen window and close the kitchen door during and after cooking.
    4) Heat the flat sufficiently.
    5) Avoid drying clothes in the flat. If no alternative, keep door shut & open window.
    6) Permit air to circulate around the walls by not placing furniture and other objects close to the walls.
    7) Leave window trickle vents open where fitted.

    Costs of redecoration due to damage caused by mildew will be charged to the tenants.

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by Pobinr View Post
      Mould is invariably due to lifestyle. I had a tenant in a bungalow of mine who swore black & blue there was a damp problem due to the building. Mould kept growing on the walls. When he moved out there has been was no more mould with new tenant in last two years. If people are going to dry clothes in a flat without windows wide open they are asking for trouble. Best not to dry clothes in the flat at all. Get a condenser washer dryer or use washing line outside or go to launderette. Also follow other guidelines below. One other tip is to switch to economy 10 instead of economy 7. This gives 10 hours of low tariff electricity including a boost in the afternoon & evening so as to get more even heat through out the day in 'all electric' flats.
      I put the following in my tenancy agreements due to problems in other flats with mould:

      Problems caused by mildew
      Mildew is a common problem in the form of black patches that grow on walls and shower curtains and around window frames. It is also inclined to grow in areas of poor air circulation due to furniture placed close to walls. Mildew can ruin paintwork & curtains. It forms when there is a high moisture content in air which then condenses on cold surfaces such as the inside surfaces of outside walls. Moisture in the air comes from a number of sources. In for example a 2 person household there is about 4litres of water put into the air every day (without taking into account any heating) i.e. Breathing (asleep) 0.12 kg, Breathing (awake) 0.35 kg, Cooking 1.2 kg, Personal washing 0.4 kg, Washing a drying clothes 2 kg
      Ways to avoid mildew
      1) Regularly air the flat by leaving windows open even just a small amount. This is essential to permit moisture to escape.
      2) Open the bathroom window and close the bathroom door during and after showering or bathing.
      3) Open the kitchen window and close the kitchen door during and after cooking.
      4) Heat the flat sufficiently.
      5) Avoid drying clothes in the flat. If no alternative, keep door shut & open window.
      6) Permit air to circulate around the walls by not placing furniture and other objects close to the walls.
      7) Leave window trickle vents open where fitted.

      Costs of redecoration due to damage caused by mildew will be charged to the tenants.
      Ok, so what if the tenants do all of this and there is still mould springing up? I bet you still charge the tenants don't you!

      Comment


        #18
        But Axle, mostly tenants can't be bothered to do it.

        The times I've asked tenants not to dry their clothes on the radiators, then in I come for some other thing and lo and behold, the clothes are drying on the radiator!

        Or I ask them to leave windows open, and then they tell me they can't becasuse their girlfriend/boyfriend doesn't like the cold drafts.

        Or I put ventilation in and find it stuffed with tissue/rags because they don't like the drafts.

        Or I give them a dehumidifier and they run it and don't empty out the water because they just can't be bothered.

        Or I put in a high powered humidity fan only to find they've deactivated it "because it runs for a long time"(well yes because it's doing it's job).

        Or I tell them to heat the flat, but they don't want to because it costs money.

        I've even had tenants trying to tell me it's rising damp that's causing the problem, on a fifth floor flat? I don't think so!

        Comment


          #19
          Just an observation I made whilst looking around at houses to rent.

          We looked at several which were not currently lived in (heat not on etc). One particular bungalow, was literally dripping with condensation. There was no mould apparent and it was in good decorative order having just been re-done(nice house in fact), but it put us off.

          I would bet my right arm in that that house, to NOT have mould eventually would have been a miracle.

          Having come from a dry climate, we are not particularly savvy to mould problems and don't do anything special in the house we're in, but I would eat my hat if it ever appeared here (we do use the extractor fans, open windows when weather permits) etc.

          But the "wet" house would most definitely been prone to it.
          Now signature free.

          Comment


            #20
            Lorenzo, if it had just been redecorated then it could take several weeks if not longer for the moisture from paint/plaster to dry out, especially if the landlord has not been heating and ventilating the place.

            If the sun has been beating down on a humid recently redecorated bungalow then there would be a lot of condensation present.

            All of my flats which have communal heating have never had mould in the bathroom. This is because the heating is full on all through the winter and the atmosphere is bone dry.

            Tells me everything I need to know about condensation really. Sufficient heating will stop it dead.

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by axle69 View Post
              Ok, so what if the tenants do all of this and there is still mould springing up? I bet you still charge the tenants don't you!
              Why do you feel the need to make offensive sarcastic remarks based on your speculation that I supposedly take money from tenants on false pretenses ?
              Why the trolling ?
              Does it give you some kind of buzz or something ?
              If tenants follow the guidelines I posted above then mould does not grow. That way I get my flats back in good shape & they don't lose part of their deposit due to mould damage. So it's of benefit to both parties. Many people have misconceptions about the causes of mould & so mould grows due to that lack of knowledge. They are greatful for the knowledge of how to avoid mould growing. So they benefit from what I've learned the hard way.
              None of my properties has rising damp. I don't own or let junk out. Why would I want that sort of aggravation.

              Comment


                #22
                I’m sorry if I have offended you, that comment was meant to be a bit tongue in cheek!

                Comment


                  #23
                  Mrs Jones:

                  I have said in previous posts that I do think its in a landlords interest to assist, within reason. Often small changes can prevent the problem and its never worth loosing a good tenant and having a property empty when simple prevenative work can be undertaken by a landlord.

                  Ultimatley though it is the resident who creates the moisture and therefore they must find the right balance between ventilating and heating. Going back to the original query, if a tenant fails to prevent the mould taking hold then a landlord is justified to charge accordingly - I can think of a number of examples where we have had to charge tenants for cleaning/decorating.

                  Absolutley nothing in the US suprises me anymore...

                  Comment

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