Noise in shared house

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    Noise in shared house

    We have one tenant in an HMO constantly complaining about being disturbed by other tenants noise

    WHAT ARE ACCEPTABLE NOISE LIMITS IN A SHARED HOUSE ? - What is the Decibel level,
    - the duration
    - the frequency
    - the time of day
    - the type of noise
    - wether is a standard noise like hoovering

    This a problematic T who goes to the Local Authority to complain
    My main question is
    WHAT SHOULD I DO ABOUT IT WHEN THE T COMPLAINS TO ME ABOUT IT??



    #2
    Personally, I'd ignore it or allow them to leave and move somewhere more suitable.
    Let them annoy the local authority.

    And they'll soon give up, unless there's some massive noise nuisance.
    And it doesn't sound like there is.
    When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
    Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

    Comment


      #3
      This is one of the issues when running a HMO, I would ask the T if they want to surrender the Tenancy, as they clearly haven't lived in a shared place.

      Comment


        #4
        As already said, stay out of it and let the tenant move on, it appears he has a HMO budget but detached expectations

        Comment


          #5
          Let the tenant go to the council about this. Depends if it’s a legitimate complaint or a ‘moaner’.

          https://www.gov.uk/guidance/noise-nu...ith-complaints
          Permitted noise levels

          The permitted noise level using A-weighted decibels (the unit environmental noise is usually measured in) is:
          • 34 dBA (decibels adjusted) if the underlying level of noise is no more than 24 dBA
          • 10 dBA above the underlying level of noise if this is more than 24 dBA
          Penalties for not complying with a warning notice

          If someone doesn’t comply with a warning notice without a reasonable excuse, councils can:
          • give a fixed penalty notice (FPN) giving them the chance to pay a fine (up to £110 for dwellings and £500 for licensed premises) within 14 days, instead of being prosecuted
          • prosecute them if they don’t issue an FPN or if the person responsible doesn’t pay the fine on time (if convicted they can get a fine of up to £1,000 for dwellings and an unlimited amount for licensed premises)
          • remove noise-making equipment like loudspeakers
          also there should be no noise from 11pm to 7am ideally

          Comment


            #6
            Excellent Advice
            thanks

            Comment


              #7
              I would be cautious about the noise nuisance and the council, they often deal with one ' house ' affecting another or alarms going off all the time etc. I am not so sure how they would view a HMO, it is effectively one dwelling with multiple individuals living there......... i doubt the legislation was designed for this circumstance.

              Give them a call by all means but do not get your hopes up.

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