My buy to let property is being used as a cannabis growing factory

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  • jpkeates
    replied
    Originally posted by DPT57 View Post
    I thought there had been binding court cases rejecting those arguments?
    If there have been, I am wrong.
    I'm (clearly) not aware of them - and would be happy to be corrected.

    Leave a comment:


  • DPT57
    replied
    Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
    The right to access for inspection doesn't actually extend to repairs and renewals.
    Thanks for the correction
    Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
    It probably does extend to valuations (because they are, generally speaking, a visit to "view[...] the[..] condition and state of repair" of a property.
    A viewing for a relet is more of a grey area, although it has, arguably, much the same purpose.
    I thought there had been binding court cases rejecting those arguments?

    Leave a comment:


  • jpkeates
    replied
    Originally posted by DPT57 View Post
    You only get a right to inspect for condition/repairs/renewals, not improvements and not viewings or valuations. You can include these in the contract, but they're probably unenforceable if the tenant declines access.
    The right to access for inspection doesn't actually extend to repairs and renewals.
    That there's no right to access for repairs is implicitly acknowledged in legislation because being unable to get access to do a repair is a defence to failing to meet a repair obligation.

    It probably does extend to valuations (because they are, generally speaking, a visit to "view[...] the[..] condition and state of repair" of a property.
    A viewing for a relet is more of a grey area, although it has, arguably, much the same purpose.

    Leave a comment:


  • Blanks7025
    replied
    Hi đź‘‹
    Does anyone have experience or advise to share on renting to a diplomat?

    Many thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Codger
    replied
    The right to inspect may be unenforcable but it sounds as if the criminals will look elsewhere if you keep on mentioning it in your advertsing. I will now put in messages that will deter such people.

    Leave a comment:


  • DPT57
    replied
    You only get a right to inspect for condition/repairs/renewals, not improvements and not viewings or valuations. You can include these in the contract, but they're probably unenforceable if the tenant declines access.

    Leave a comment:


  • Godffrey
    replied
    DPT57 That is very interesting. So, the right to inspect is enshrined in an act. Thank heavens for that.

    In that case, the agreement with my estate agent looks to be a light regarding their responsibilities. That sounds about right. I've asked them for clarification. Thank you DPT57



    Edit: I take it you're referring to the following covenant, which I was aware of:

    "the lessor, or any person authorised by him in writing, may at reasonable times of the day and on giving 24 hours’ notice in writing to the occupier, enter the premises comprised in the lease for the purpose of viewing their condition and state of repair."

    I thought their might be a more specific reference to inspections, but exercising the right to enter (with notice) can be employed for inspectons.

    Leave a comment:


  • DPT57
    replied
    Originally posted by Godffrey View Post
    >>Are there any landlords who have made inspections (while occupied) a condition of the tenancy? Is this even possible?
    It's a standard clause in every tenancy agreement I've ever seen. I'd be amazed if its not in yours. What model are you using?

    As well as being a contractual right in most cases, it's also a statutory right under S11 of the Housing Act 1985.

    How else would you meet all your statutory obligations?

    Leave a comment:


  • AlexR
    replied
    Originally posted by Godffrey View Post
    >>Are there any landlords who have made inspections (while occupied) a condition of the tenancy? Is this even possible?
    I used to drive by each of my properties at least once a week. It's quite surprising what you can see - curtains closed in middle of day, bins still outside days after collection etc. The neighbours will be aware of what's going on so it is always good to make sure they have your contact details.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mrs Mug
    replied
    Originally posted by nukecad View Post
    Run the taps, click the light switches, test the smoke alarms, keep you eyes open.
    Check the gutters, drains, fences, that kind of thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • nukecad
    replied
    Originally posted by Godffrey View Post
    I've always wanted my tenants to feel free to live without the ever looming prospect of inspections hanging over them,
    It doesn't have to be an official matter with clipboards and lists.

    Just say that you are going round for 'a regular visit to check that everything is working as it should and nothing needs replacing'.

    Run the taps, click the light switches, test the smoke alarms, keep you eyes open.

    That should be enough to spot anything of concern.

    Leave a comment:


  • Godffrey
    replied
    All these mentioned of periodic inspections struck me as very sensible. Certainly one tool in the landlord's arsenal for ensuring that nothing illegal or untoward is going on, and it got me wondering. I've just been through my tenancy and my landlord insurance docs and inspections (while occupied) are not mentioned at all. (My insurer is Zurich, by the way.)

    I thought inspections were a routine part of property management when you have an agent, but clearly not.

    >>Are there any landlords who have made inspections (while occupied) a condition of the tenancy? Is this even possible?

    I've always wanted my tenants to feel free to live without the ever looming prospect of inspections hanging over them, but it would provide peace of mind to visit the premises every quarter, for example, to ensure no illegal activity. A necessary evil if you will.

    Leave a comment:


  • DPT57
    replied
    As jpkeates says, you need to ask for feedback. There has to be something you're missing or have ignored that tenants don't like about your property and you need to find out what it is asap.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hudson01
    replied
    Originally posted by Blanks7025 View Post
    makes me feel that the police need to do more to support landlords
    Just to put an alternative view to this, you could take the view that LL's need to do more with better vetting and inspections to save the Police from having to go and clear the bloody things, it can take a considerable amount of manpower to clear out a building (which then results in less officers to respond to grade 1 calls), it also costs the taxpayer a fortune into the bargain, so i would say that a private LL should do all they can to save money from the public purse and inspect properly on a regular basis, and take no excuses.

    Leave a comment:


  • jpkeates
    replied
    darkdev I've never had this happen to me, but I've had many many things happen that I never expected or imagined could possibly happen.
    I share your pain!

    Leave a comment:

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