Tenants shilly shallying

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    Tenants shilly shallying

    A couple of weeks ago, my friend introduced me to a potential tenant. She liked the flat, agreed the rent, and we agreed she would move in 1st August. I took a week's rent as deposit.

    In view of the lady living some distance away, I gave her the key safe combination, as she wanted to get beds delivered. I sent her a draft tenancy agreement, and all the other documents we have to provide.

    A few days later, she rang me again asking to renegotiate the rent, but I stood firm. Then last week she asked if her partner could be on the tenancy agreement, which I agreed. Another few days, and she asked if we could make it Monday rather than today. Again I saw no harm in this, and agreed.

    Today she rang to arrange a time for tomorrow, and said she had dropped off a suitcase at the flat. I explained that she & her partner would need to come with their passports for me to scan, and to sign the agreement.

    'Oh, you can add my partner on Tuesday', she said.

    'That's not how it works my dear,' I told her. You can both come on Tuesday, or you can come alone tomorrow.

    More shilly shallying, so I hung up and went over to the flat to remove her suitcase, and took it back to my friend, together with the money. The cheeky woman had taken away my keys from the key safe, so I had to change the locks.

    She now agrees to come alone tomorrow, but frankly I'm fed up with the palaver.

    Any thoughts?



    #2
    If she wants to move in, then get the money back for the locks being changed. If you referenced both T's and they passed, then I would mark it as teething problems especially if the T hasn't rented previously. I avoid this type of situation by getting the T to sign the tenancy at a pre-agreed date and time, and then after that it is up to them to sort out.

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      #3
      Oh, I don't know the partner from Adam. I just (foolishly) took my friend's assurance that she is good for the money, and she showed me her passport the other day.

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        #4
        Always follow your process (if you have any) with any T referencing, even if they are recommended by someone. Most insurance want this conducted to avoid the policy being void.

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          #5
          Originally posted by JK0 View Post
          Oh, I don't know the partner from Adam. I just (foolishly) took my friend's assurance that she is good for the money, and she showed me her passport the other day.
          I think you already know the answer to your question, there are simply too many alarm bells for me, i would pull out and get better prospects and conduct the long standing and sensible checks we all have to do, i am sure you know that if you get a '' wrong un ''...... it will end in tears..... yours.

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            #6
            Friend = alarm bells
            Family = alarm bells

            ANY prospective tenant - however sourced - should be put through exactly the same process as anyone else.

            YOU set the process, not the prospective tenant.

            You want to know before they move in if they can follow simple instructions in a timely manner - if they cannot then question how that will play out once they have your property and keys.

            Sorry if it sounds harsh, but I expect tenants to be actively wanting the property and even to go out of their way to show they are keen.

            Two months ago, I had several people after one of my studio flats - I try to be fair so stated I would (subject to references etc) select the first to view if they wanted the property.

            I had the first 2 visitors both want to rent it but stuck to the fairness rule and went with the first - on the Thursday, I sent him the documents to view and sign in order to start referencing and he told me he'd deal with it after the weekend = wrong answer. I moved on to applicant 2 who couldnt believe his luck and had everything done within 4hrs.

            Don't let other people dictate how you let your own property - we get enough of that from the Gov and LA as it is.
            My views are my own - you may not agree with them. I tend say things as I see them and I don't do "political correctness". Just because we may not agree you can still buy me a pint lol

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              #7
              I suppose they might just innocently / ignorantly think that because it's a friend of a friend they can be more casual. And your being laid back has possibly affirmed this. Go with your gut but just sounds like you need to politely bring formality back to the situation and make sure they understand that you will be treating it like any other tenancy. Tenants rarely give much thought to the the legal significance of order and formality.
              Assume I know nothing.

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                #8
                I suspect I'm still on @JKO's ignore list, but I'd bin these "tenants".

                Extra points for use of shilly-shallying, though.
                When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
                  I suspect I'm still on @JKO's ignore list, but I'd bin these "tenants".

                  Extra points for use of shilly-shallying, though.
                  Agree.

                  I mean, take yourself out of the situation and read what you wrote back to yourself...

                  1. A friend recommended (no references or checks I presume?)
                  2. They renegotiate rent before even being in the place
                  3. They aren't up-front about who's staying there
                  4. They seem generally flakey
                  5. They take liberties on the access you provided and start moving themselves in
                  6. They take the keys away

                  Playing with fire, my friend lol

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                    #10
                    Very well said ' hybrice'.

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                      #11
                      I took over a rented Commercial property, with an existing tenant, I rented it to her for two years, then I sold it, the existing tenant was accepted by the new owner. I now understand that the tenant is behind with the rent, and owes a fortune for metered water, and I have now been informed that the tenant is an undischarged bankrupt and uses another name. Just shows I should have done a credit check as should the new owner of the property.

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