New tenancy signed without guarantee

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    #16
    Originally posted by mokka View Post
    oh and ‘landlord-man’ it is not your place to judge so keep your condescending nonsense to yourself and be more polite.
    It's always interesting when someone who obviously owns the forum shows up to remind people what they can and can't do.
    Particularly when the post they made immediately prior to this one was judgemental (although its a judgement I share).

    When someone posts a question or provides information and requests feedback, they can obviously expect people to offer judgements.
    People will criticise as well as offer positive feedback.
    And, in this case, as very often, the question has both a legal and an ethical element - not only can I do x, but, also, should I?

    But, obviously, if someone can point out where in the rules it's prohibited to "judge" I'll stop doing it.

    When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
    Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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      #17
      Just to add my own perspective as a landlord:

      I think people are largely agreed that there is probably no legal obligation.

      I don't think the OP has a moral obligation to the landlord - if the landlord wanted a guarantor for the new tenancy they should have asked for one. It's not up to relatives to indemnify landlords against either their or their agent's mistakes.

      The only reason I can see for the OP to step in is to voluntarily protect the stepson from prosecution - but then only if they are clearly going to be prosecuted. I don't feel well enough informed to decide whether I think that he should or should not do that.

      I have a similar situation to the OP's with a troubled niece who lives abroad - it can be very difficult knowing what the right thing to do is. Repeatedly bailing them out is not always the answer. I think you would have to be a little short on life experience to feel entitled to jump to confident conclusions on the personal issues on the basis of a single post.
      Assume I know nothing.

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        #18
        Originally posted by Hooper View Post
        It's not up to relatives to indemnify landlords against either their or their agent's mistakes.
        I think that's a really strong point.

        The Son may be eligible for a mental health Breathing Space if he is currently getting help.

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          #19
          Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
          It's always interesting when someone who obviously owns the forum shows up to remind people what they can and can't do.
          Particularly when the post they made immediately prior to this one was judgemental (although its a judgement I share).

          When someone posts a question or provides information and requests feedback, they can obviously expect people to offer judgements.
          People will criticise as well as offer positive feedback.
          And, in this case, as very often, the question has both a legal and an ethical element - not only can I do x, but, also, should I?

          But, obviously, if someone can point out where in the rules it's prohibited to "judge" I'll stop doing it.

          nothing to do with rules, more decency and having a stiff upper lip.

          I’ve read plenty of threads on here where I could have said blunt things but I didn’t as no doubt life isn’t as simple as that where ppl do things for whatever reasons.

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                        #26

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                          #27
                          I've attached all the pages with information on. I forgot to mention that the guarantee that I signed specified a different address to the one he lived in - their mistake which they highlighted to me and said it didn't make any difference.

                          They haven't sent me a copy of the original tenancy agreement from 2019.

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                            #28
                            So far so good. For the record, please confirm that your step-son did actually change rooms.

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                              #29
                              I think at this point I would be responding briefly, asking them to forward a copy of the guarantor letter relating to the tenancy that they are actually claiming a loss for, rather than the previous tenancy, because you don't believe such a guarantor letter exists.

                              And possibly making the point that the guarantor letter that they have supplied doesn't appear to create a contract because there is no consideration associated with it, and it doesn't appear to be in the form of a deed.
                              When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                              Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Yes, he changed rooms lawcruncher.

                                What are your thoughts on the guarantee being for the wrong address?

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