Mandating Wifi

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  • 45002
    replied
    Originally posted by spicelord View Post

    (presumably if I can see smoke or fire then its allowed!).
    If you can see smoke/fire.

    Dial 999

    Don't mess around going in yourself, or you could end up in hospital or even worse !

    Leave a comment:


  • nukecad
    replied
    I've just got a new router that has a tool like that built into the router management UI.

    (I've renamed the wifi network SSID as "Ye Oldie Interweb Thingymabob", should give the neighbours a chuckle).

    Leave a comment:


  • Neelix
    replied
    This is a really handy tool to see what channels are being used around you ...

    https://www.acrylicwifi.com/en/wlan-...lic-wifi-free/

    Leave a comment:


  • jpkeates
    replied
    Originally posted by spicelord View Post
    Also theres the whole issue if the fire alarm goes off and no-ones home I would have to make a judgement about the emergency access clause in the tenancy (presumably if I can see smoke or fire then its allowed!).
    You can always enter in an emergency - no need to put that in the tenancy agreement.

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  • jpkeates
    replied
    Originally posted by nukecad View Post
    You can manually put them on different wifi chanels to prevent that.
    Almost no one knows which channels interfere with each other, though.
    And smart routers end up hopping all over the place as they adjust to each other.

    But, essentially, the router is going to be under the tenant's control, you can't make them use it as you want.
    You're one fairly routine reset from it all not working.


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  • spicelord
    replied
    Originally posted by nukecad View Post
    If you want your own router/wifi for the alarms, and the tenants to have their own separate router/wifi for their use then you will need two landlines unless one, or both, of the routers uses a mobile signal rather than a landline.

    Probably best for yours to be mobile leaving the landline free for the tenants if they want to use it with a phone as well as a router.
    Something like this tucked away in a cupboard or in the attic: https://shop.ee.co.uk/dongles/pay-mo...-2020/details#

    Nice idea on using a MIFI as it gets around the whole issue of needing access to their wifi in the first place to connect to the smart devices. But then some tenants may also want to get the alerts, which is fine as long as the MIFI device is locked down and can't be used to access the internet for anything else.
    An unlocked MIFI with a PAYG SIM would even be cheaper.

    Also theres the whole issue if the fire alarm goes off and no-ones home I would have to make a judgement about the emergency access clause in the tenancy (presumably if I can see smoke or fire then its allowed!).

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  • nukecad
    replied
    Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
    Two routers with their own wifi networks will just interfere with each other.
    You can manually put them on different wifi chanels to prevent that.

    Modern routers can work that out for themselves and set to a less used channel if needed, may take them a week or so to monitor who is using what channels and adjust.

    Leave a comment:


  • jpkeates
    replied
    Originally posted by spicelord View Post
    Is there any reasonable way of stating in the tenancy agreement they must have active wifi connection specifically for the fire/smoke/carbon alarms to operate?
    You don't just need wifi, for remote access you'd need them to have broadband.
    And, to clarify, to mandate that would be illegal (Tenant Fees Act).
    You can't require a tenant to enter into a contract with a 3rd party as a condition of letting to them.

    Leave a comment:


  • jpkeates
    replied
    Two routers with their own wifi networks will just interfere with each other.

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  • Neelix
    replied
    AND if you supply broadband does this mean the LL will also be liable for any fixed line calls?

    Leave a comment:


  • nukecad
    replied
    If you want your own router/wifi for the alarms, and the tenants to have their own seperate router/wifi for their use then you will need two landlines unless one, or both, of the routers uses a mobile signal rather than a landline.

    Probably best for yours to be mobile leaving the landline free for the tenants if they want to use it with a phone as well as a router.
    Something like this tucked away in a cupboard or in the attic: https://shop.ee.co.uk/dongles/pay-mo...-2020/details#


    Leave a comment:


  • spicelord
    replied
    I'm coming from a place of having to deal with a fire that almost took down the whole property and it was fully fitted with smoke/fire detectors that we had just tested. The neighbours ignored the alarm until they saw the fire coming out the windows. So yes I'm installing the latest smart alarms.

    Yeah I'm installing google nest alarms, the heating is already google nest. TBH if you install properly you wont have an issue with burnt toast. Its tricky as I think probably all I can do is talking to prospective tenants and get a handshake agreement beforehand and put a best endeavours clause in the contract that states what the wifi is needed for.
    I definitely will not be providing wifi, as that is a minefield for a lot of reasons. They need to arrange that themselves.
    As for motion detection, thats just necessary to avoid false alarms precisely so I dont get a call when theres someone in the kitchen, but also they will get the audible alarm, so all I have to do really is just contact them if the alarm isn't turned off after two minutes.

    As long as you're up front and honest with tenants, I would rather deal with tenants who are reasonable and weed out the ones who are likely to turn 'karen' on me.

    God help anyone installing a Ring door camera :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • jpkeates
    replied
    Nest smoke alarms are very good and are not prone to false alarms - they're quite intelligent.
    So your toast has to be pretty much on fire to set them off.
    The older ones used to be a bit prone to being set off by dust if they were covered in it, and you'd have to clean them to stop them going off, but the newer models seem to have sorted that.

    Nest products are also motion detectors, and tenants might find them intrusive.
    They also test themselves periodically.
    I'd also be wary of supplying anything that works remotely - if you get warned of a fire several miles away, on a Sunday night, what are you meant to do?

    Supplying broadband and wifi is a bit of a minefield, whoever controls the router can track what the users are looking at, unless the users are quite tech savvy, and you probably don't want to be responsible for what some people download.

    Leave a comment:


  • ram
    replied
    Originally posted by Neelix View Post
    All your experience proves is that the wrong type of alarm was installed in your kitchen


    Alarms fitted by landlord, and no smoke alarm in kitchen, nor in the house I currently rent.
    I did say "Depends on the smoke alarm though." but don't expect Google Nest Smoke alarms to be suppiled in different forms for kitchen only, or the one in the next room that wont measure fat and toast.



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  • ash72
    replied
    What happens in the event there is a power cut, or the network is down by the operator...... and you need to reset the system. I'm assuming your the one who will pay for the wifi - you then open another can of worms on downloading illegal material etc, Is this for a HMO or a single family home? Get the property smoke/heat detectors hard wired with and an auxiliary battery. Save your money for your own house if you want these types of gadgets.

    Leave a comment:

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