Granddad being homeowner, mum paying bills, boiler grant... conundrum

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    Granddad being homeowner, mum paying bills, boiler grant... conundrum

    And I am the 18 year old son

    This is really quite an annoying and unnecessarily confusing situation, but such is life.

    Allow me to describe:

    - In our house (no mortgage, freehold), are my mum and my brothers.

    - The registered, legal homeowner is my granddad.

    - There is no rent payments, there is no tenancy agreement.

    - We have inhabited the house since ~2006.

    - My mum pays all the bills and does all the homeowner-y things, apart from actually legally being a homeowner.

    - She receives Child Benefits and Child Tax Credits.

    - I want to get a boiler grant, because she receives the benefits, but the obstacle is this silly homeowner-or-not situation. We explain our situation, and then the boiler grant companies say no you're not eligible.

    - No utility bills are in his name. He pays no bills. He doesn't live here.

    - We are not worried about our security here by the way, he won't evict us of course, but the reason he did not transfer the ownership was because my dad, then alive, was mentally ill. Now my dad is deceased but my granddad hasn't done anything, and in an Asian household where my mum is the daughter-in-law, not the daughter, it is very difficult for her to bring up this type of topic to my granddad.

    My questions are as follows:

    1) Firstly, do we meet the legal definition of tenant? I suspect not, but I'd like to hear your thoughts.

    2) Is there any way to receive this grant? Surely they don't need to be so insistent on the homeowner situation? We're a low income family and I would have thought they're keen on improving the energy efficiency of houses belonging to people who can't afford to take energy saving measures.

    Many thanks!

    #2
    Ah, you really don't want a boiler grant. They'll use the cheapest crappiest boiler they can find, bodge the installation, and charge outrageously for any contribution you have to make. The thing will pack up in a few years, but you will not be able to get it repaired.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by superpossible View Post

      My questions are as follows:

      1) Firstly, do we meet the legal definition of tenant? I suspect not, but I'd like to hear your thoughts.

      2) Is there any way to receive this grant? Surely they don't need to be so insistent on the homeowner situation? We're a low income family and I would have thought they're keen on improving the energy efficiency of houses belonging to people who can't afford to take energy saving measures.
      1) If you don't have a written or verbal tenancy agreement and you don't pay rent, then no.

      2) It depends which grant. They move the goalposts all the time. You have to play the game. I've done it. It is purposely bureaucratic. But once you've done a couple and know which boxes to tick and the time is right, it is possible.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by JK0 View Post
        Ah, you really don't want a boiler grant. They'll use the cheapest crappiest boiler they can find, bodge the installation, and charge outrageously for any contribution you have to make. The thing will pack up in a few years, but you will not be able to get it repaired.
        I thought you once said none of your properties had gas boilers?
        (Although I agree with the gist of your post.)

        Last one I had done was a decent quality Vaillant with a 5 year warranty. Parts readily available and it can be repaired.

        My regular plumber went round afterwards and installed it properly.

        At a very rough guess, everything considered, each 'free' boiler saved me about £400.

        Was it worth all the hassle? Yes, just.

        Would I bother doing it again? Probably not.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by superpossible View Post
          1) Firstly, do we meet the legal definition of tenant? I suspect not, but I'd like to hear your thoughts.
          No. You are almost certainly not tenants, you are most likely guests.
          2) Is there any way to receive this grant? Surely they don't need to be so insistent on the homeowner situation? We're a low income family and I would have thought they're keen on improving the energy efficiency of houses belonging to people who can't afford to take energy saving measures.
          If the company that makes money pursuading you to take the grant say no, I'd guess the answer is definitely no.


          When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
          Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by superpossible View Post
            Surely they don't need to be so insistent on the homeowner situation? We're a low income family and I would have thought they're keen on improving the energy efficiency of houses belonging to people who can't afford to take energy saving measures
            Do you really think "they" should use taxpayer's money to increase the value of your grandfather's property?

            When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
            Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
              Do you really think "they" should use taxpayer's money to increase the value of your grandfather's property?
              That's a bit harsh.

              The whole scheme is a pretend Lefty Green farce imposing a legal obligation on energy providers.
              N.B not taxpayers, directly.

              I don't agree with it but if that is what's been decreed, as a rich landlord I see nothing wrong in taking advantage of it. I certainly don't see anything wrong with an 18 year old seeking out legitimate ways to help his family.

              If the point of the scheme is to help low income families in fuel poverty, what moral difference does it make whether it increases the value of the grandfather's property or one of yours (or mine)?

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by boletus View Post
                That's a bit harsh.
                Quite possibly.
                Maybe I should have left that one with my "inside" voice.
                When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by superpossible View Post
                  And I am the 18 year old son

                  ..............

                  - My mum pays all the bills and does all the homeowner-y things, apart from actually legally being a homeowner.

                  ..................
                  Rent doesn't have to me ££|£. Can be "moneysworth". See Law of Property Act 1925 s205 (xxiii)
                  https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga...20/section/205
                  xxiii) “Rent” includes a rent service or a rentcharge, or other rent, toll, duty, royalty, or annual or periodical payment in money or money’s worth...................
                  And note a tenancy does not have to be written (in England, bonkers!)

                  "....Pays all bills......". The issue might what bills. Food bill, electric bill fine, but if she eg pays for redecoration/recarpeting costs, insurance, repairs, improvements to the house etc etc etc .. .. (Is there insurance on the house & contents and does insurer understand circumstances??)
                  .

                  A tricky one....

                  But I agree, avoid the boiler grant:...

                  Is there a grandad will & what happens to the property?? There might be CGT to pay.. (as it hasn;t been his home...)
                  I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by theartfullodger View Post

                    Is there a grandad will & what happens to the property?? There might be CGT to pay.. (as it hasn;t been his home...)
                    Then it would be inheritance tax not capital gains tax.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Apologies, boletus correct
                      I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

                      Comment

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